•   
  •   

Health & Fitness Glimmers of hope for immunity in survivors of mild COVID-19

21:18  17 august  2020
21:18  17 august  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

President Trump Says America's 1.5 Million Coronavirus Cases Are ‘Badge of Honor’ for Testing

  President Trump Says America's 1.5 Million Coronavirus Cases Are ‘Badge of Honor’ for Testing The U.S. has the highest number of reported infections globally“I view it as a badge of honor, really, it’s a badge of honor,” Trump told reporters during a cabinet meeting at the White House on Tuesday. “It’s a great tribute to the testing and all of the work that a lot of professionals have done.

We're still at least months away from a coronavirus vaccine - but studies suggest that that millions of people who have recovered from the infection will be  protected against getting it again for at least three months.

Much of the research and discussion of coronavirus immunity has focused on antibodies, with some suggesting these SARS-CoV-2-specific fighters provide little, weak, or only a brief shield from getting the virus again.

No10 disowns Cabinet minister Therese Coffey after she blames government coronavirus blunders over testing and care homes on 'wrong' science advice

  No10 disowns Cabinet minister Therese Coffey after she blames government coronavirus blunders over testing and care homes on 'wrong' science advice Downing Street heaped praise on its experts and insisted 'ministers decide' after the comments by the Work and Pensions Secretary caused a storm.  As a furious blame game erupted yesterday, Ms Coffey appeared to try to pass the buck.

But recent studies have found robust responses to infection from not only antibodies, but at least two other types of immune cells - B and T cells - as well.

They also suggest that mild infections can result in sufficient immune responses to block the virus from invading a person's body a second time - a relief after early research signalled that people who didn't get severely ill might have little protection.

a group of people in a room: Coronavirus antibodies seem to quickly wane in survivors of mild infections - but recent studies suggest they may still be protected by T and B cells that fight the virus and can restart antibody production to fight re-infection (pictured: Eddie Mena has his blood drawn for coronavirus antibody testing in Florida, file) © Provided by Daily Mail Coronavirus antibodies seem to quickly wane in survivors of mild infections - but recent studies suggest they may still be protected by T and B cells that fight the virus and can restart antibody production to fight re-infection (pictured: Eddie Mena has his blood drawn for coronavirus antibody testing in Florida, file)

An estimated 40 percent of people with coronavirus have no symptoms, and the majority of coronavirus cases are only mild, with symptoms like cough and fever.

China’s New Outbreak Shows Signs the Virus Could Be Changing

  China’s New Outbreak Shows Signs the Virus Could Be Changing Chinese doctors are seeing the coronavirus manifest differently among patients in its new cluster of cases in the northeast region compared to the original outbreak in Wuhan , suggesting that the pathogen may be changing in unknown ways and complicating efforts to stamp it out.Patients found in the northern provinces of Jilin and Heilongjiang appear to carry the virus for a longer period of time and take longer to test negative, Qiu Haibo, one of China’s top critical care doctors, told state television on Tuesday.

The human body responds to a new infection by learning what the pathogen is, and creating antibodies - bespoke immune cells made to specifically fight off that invader, should it be encountered again.

Antibodies are the most precise tools the body makes to fight infections, so earlier studies that found low levels of coronavirus antibodies that waned within weeks in people who survived mild bouts of illness were concerning.

However, antibodies are not the only defense the body develops after an infection.

The latest research shows promising signs that other forces are activated in people who suffered only mild infections, and that these responses may effectively combat coronavirus if someone is exposed again.

Among the latest is a study published on Friday in the journal Cell, in advance of its peer-review process.

Collaborating researchers from several countries including the UK and Sweden found that T cells - white blood cells that directly attack infections and alert other elements of the immune system to the threat - fight coronavirus in survivors of mild infections.

The Scientist Behind Some of the World's Best Coronavirus Images

  The Scientist Behind Some of the World's Best Coronavirus Images The Scientist Behind Some of the World's Best Coronavirus ImagesOver the past three decades, Fischer, 58, and her team at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories, part of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, have captured and created some of the more dramatic images of the world’s most dangerous pathogens.

a close up of a logo © Provided by Daily Mail a screenshot of a video game © Provided by Daily Mail

Their work confirmed an odd pattern seen in other studies: patients who had severe coronavirus infections didn't have particularly high levels of T cells.

But it added something new, in that people who recovered from mild infections did higher levels of T cells.

Once they'd extracted some of these immune cells from coronavirus patients, the scientists put them to the test by combining them with coronavirus particles in the lab.

They observed that the T cells recognized the virus and mounted a significant defense. They multiplied themselves and sent chemical signals out that would instruct the rest of the immune system to gear up for battle.

Importantly, the patients the cells were taken from had long enough recovered that they had weak levels of antibodies, meaning that even in the absence of those well-honed immune cells, the patients wouldn't be totally back to baseline if they were confronted with coronavirus again.

a close up of a sign © Provided by Daily Mail

One of the other components of the immune system that's prompted by T cells is a group of infection fighters called B cells.

FIFA and WHO launch campaign to help domestic violence victims amid coronavirus lockdown

  FIFA and WHO launch campaign to help domestic violence victims amid coronavirus lockdown Several past and present footballing stars are taking part in the initiative which is designed to raise awarenessWith many families all over the world quarantined during the pandemic, there have been spikes in recent reports of domestic violence as at-risk women and children are forced into dangerous situations at home.

B cells are the parent cells of antibodies. Once word comes from T cells to B cells, studies have found signs that B cells are capable of quickly scaling up antibody production,

Plus, other research suggests that although antibodies decline sharply after someone clears a coronavirus infection, they don't disappear altogether.

Arizona University and University of Washington studies have found coronavirus antibodies hibernating at low but stable levels in the bloodstream and bone marrow.

That's normal, and gives the body a stockpile of the immune cells, ready to multiply and more quickly attack coronavirus if it returns.

'This is exactly what you would hope for,' Dr Marion Peppers, a University of Washington immunologist who worked on one such study, told the New York Times.

'All the pieces are there to have a totally protective immune response.'

The signs are there, and promising, but we still have to see them play out in real time to know just how protective any of these agents are against re-infection.

On a population level, the longevity of the T cells and B cells involved in the immune system's response to coronavirus and production of antibodies are also hopeful signs that herd immunity will be effective and that so long as a coronavirus vaccine generates a similar response, it might just work to protect people from infection.

I Have Depression and Anxiety, and COVID-19 Has Taken an Emotional Toll

  I Have Depression and Anxiety, and COVID-19 Has Taken an Emotional Toll Taking care of your mental health should always be a priority, but for me and I suspect many others, it's been especially challenging during the coronavirus outbreak. As someone with anxiety and depression, I already struggle with day-to-day activities, but the loss of normalcy, increased social isolation, and seemingly endless amount of uncertainty has only made things worse.As a college student, I was forced to leave my apartment and return home for the remainder of the semester, as classes transitioned to online learning.

Read more

Video: CBD can improve brain blood flow finds new study (Cover Video)

Global coronavirus cases top 7 million as outbreak grows in Brazil, India - Reuters tally .
Global coronavirus cases top 7 million as outbreak grows in Brazil, India - Reuters tallyAbout 30% of those cases, or 2 million infections, are in the United States. Latin America has the second-largest outbreak with over 15% of cases.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!