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Health & Fitness 60,000 mothers-to-be still smoke while pregnant

11:01  19 september  2020
11:01  19 september  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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still smoke while pregnant – as official Government target to reduce the number to 6% is likely to Almost 60 , 000 women in England are said to have been smokers when pregnant Progress in reducing number of pregnant smokers has stalled in recent years Risks of a miscarriage are increased by smoking during pregnancy and it can also cause

Mothers - to - be in Corby are 21 TIMES more likely to smoke than those living in Luton, NHS figures reveal (so how many expectant mothers still light up in Smoking while pregnant is a leading cause of stillbirth and miscarriage, Action on Smoking and Health says, but there are still thousands of

a woman standing in a room: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

The official target of reducing the number of women who smoke in pregnancy to 6 per cent is likely to be missed by a decade, research suggests.

Almost 60,000 women in England are said to have been smokers when they gave birth in the year up to March, 10 per cent of the total number of deliveries.

Risks of a miscarriage are increased by smoking during pregnancy and it can also cause sudden infant death, stillbirth and premature delivery.

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And smoking while you’re pregnant can cause serious problems, too. Your baby could be born too early If you smoked and had a healthy pregnancy in the past, there’s no guarantee that your next The best time to quit smoking is before you get pregnant , but quitting at any time during pregnancy

Not every single person that drinks while pregnant gives birth to a baby with disabilities. It is a possibility not a guarantee.

a woman standing in a room © Provided by Daily Mail

The Government’s target is to reduce the rate of pregnant smokers to 6 per cent by 2022, but this will only be met between 2030 and 2040, according to data analysed by The Times.

The Lullaby Trust, a charity that highlights sudden infant death syndrome, found that if the 6 per cent target were met by 2022 this could lead to 73 fewer stillborn babies per year, 25 fewer neonatal deaths, 11 fewer sudden infant deaths, 796 fewer premature babies and 2,407 fewer babies born at a low birth weight.

It comes after proposals were revealed this week where women who drink a single glass of wine before they know they are pregnant will have it documented on their child’s medical records.

Progress in reducing the number of pregnant smokers has stalled in recent years and between 2017 and 2018 the total rose.

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Smoking during pregnancy was also relatively common among white women, with more than 10 per cent reporting that they continued to smoke while pregnant . But only six per cent of black women and 1.8 percent of Hispanic carried on smoking during pregnancy . Commenting on the findings Patrick

Smoking while pregnant significantly increases the risk of serious birth defects including missing and deformed limbs The study, which looked at a total of 174, 000 cases of malformation, was published online At risk: Babies of mothers who smoke are 28 per cent more likely to have a cleft lip or palate.

The 6 per cent target was introduced in 2017. But for the year ending in March, only 37 NHS organisations out of 180 reached the 6 per cent target or lower.

The charity Action on Smoking and Health says one reason why progress to cut the number of pregnant smokers has halted is because women are not referred to specialist stop-smoking services.

Jenny Ward, chief executive of the Lullaby Trust, said: ‘The Government missing its target to reduce rates of smoking among pregnant women will have tragic consequences for families.’

Progress in reducing the number of pregnant smokers has stalled in recent years and between 2017 and 2018 the total rose [File photo] © Provided by Daily Mail Progress in reducing the number of pregnant smokers has stalled in recent years and between 2017 and 2018 the total rose [File photo] Read more

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No link between swine flu vaccine and autism in children .
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usr: 1
This is interesting!