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Health & Fitness Smokers 'three times more likely to die prematurely from heart disease'

16:00  29 october  2020
16:00  29 october  2020 Source:   covermg.com

COVID-19 linked to heart damage in healthy people, small study suggests

  COVID-19 linked to heart damage in healthy people, small study suggests Most of the study participants had mild or moderate COVID-19 symptoms and were not hospitalized.The study, published Monday (July 27) in the journal JAMA Cardiology, involved 100 adults ages 45 to 53 in Germany who had recently recovered from COVID-19. About one-third of participants required hospitalization while the other two thirds were able to recover at home. On MRI scans taken more than two months after their diagnosis, about three-quarters of these patients showed signs of heart abnormalities, including inflammation of the heart muscle, or myocarditis.

Smokers are almost three times more likely to die prematurely from heart disease or stroke.

  Smokers 'three times more likely to die prematurely from heart disease' © Peter Steffen/DPA/Cover Images

New research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association has highlighted the huge risks of smoking, with the habit estimated to cause 100,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease in the U.S. each year. Previous studies have found a link between childhood smoking and premature death, while these new findings have focused on premature fatal cardiovascular disease.

Current smokers were found to be almost three times more likely to die prematurely from heart disease or stroke, with those who start during childhood at greatest risk.

COVID-19 linked to heart damage in healthy people, small study suggests

  COVID-19 linked to heart damage in healthy people, small study suggests Most of the study participants had mild or moderate COVID-19 symptoms and were not hospitalized.The study, published Monday (July 27) in the journal JAMA Cardiology, involved 100 adults ages 45 to 53 in Germany who had recently recovered from COVID-19. About one-third of participants required hospitalization while the other two thirds were able to recover at home. On MRI scans taken more than two months after their diagnosis, about three-quarters of these patients showed signs of heart abnormalities, including inflammation of the heart muscle, or myocarditis.

"It was surprising to see how consistent these findings were with our earlier research and with other studies from around the world, including from the U.K., Australia and Japan... both in terms of the substantial risks associated with smoking and with the health benefits of quitting smoking," said lead study author Blake Thomson, an epidemiologist at the University of Oxford. "The age at which a person begins smoking is an important and often overlooked factor, and those who start smoking at a young age are at especially high risk of dying prematurely from cardiovascular disease... Getting people to quit smoking remains one of the greatest health priorities globally."


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The study analysed 390,929 adults aged 25 to 74, examining medical history, lifestyle habits and demographics of both smokers and non-smokers. The data was collected between 1997 and 2014 and smokers were grouped by the age when they had started smoking.

Fifty-eight per cent of people in the study had never smoked, while 23 per cent used to smoke and 19 per cent were still smoking. From the group of current smokers, 19 per cent had started between the ages of 10 and 14.

Scientists discovered that people who quit smoking by the age of 40 reduced the risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease by 90 per cent. The data also showed that the earlier a person quits, the bigger the health benefits.

"Preventing the next generation from smoking can save lives, but we must also emphasize that quitting smoking can save lives now, and in the years to come," Thomson added. "Simply put, health policies should aim to prevent young people from smoking and should clearly communicate the benefits of quitting to those who do smoke, ideally as young as possible, and before the onset of serious illness."

Mysterious inflammatory syndrome tied to COVID-19 strikes adults as well as kids .
Like the syndrome in children, MIS-A is a severe illness that targets multiple organs and causes increased inflammation. Bacteria and viruses that are deadly to one type of creature can evolve quickly to infect another. While the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (which causes COVID-19) is the latest example, a host of infectious and deadly diseases have hopped from animals to humans and even from humans to animals.

usr: 3
This is interesting!