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Health & Fitness Covid vaccine: the row over the UK’s single dose strategy explained

02:07  25 january  2021
02:07  25 january  2021 Source:   msn.com

Only a 'small chance' of a Covid-19 vaccine by Xmas: Oxford

  Only a 'small chance' of a Covid-19 vaccine by Xmas: Oxford Oxford University's Professor Andrew Pollard poured cold water on the idea a vaccine could be rolled out by the end of the year. As did Kate Bingham, the UK's vaccine tsar.Professor Andrew Pollard said he was optimistic data showing his team's vaccine works and is safe will be available by the end of the year.

The Doctors' Association UK also raised "real and grave concerns" over the new vaccination strategy , warning Friday that it "Pfizer and BioNTech' s Phase 3 study for the Covid -19 vaccine was designed to evaluate the vaccine ' s safety and efficacy following a 2- dose schedule, separated by 21

On Monday, the world heard how the UK ' s Covid vaccine - from AstraZeneca and Oxford University - was highly effective in advanced trials. On Thursday, multiple news outlets in the UK and US reported that there were questions over the data. They weren't about safety, but rather how effective

a hand holding a bottle: A nurse holds a bottle of Pfizer coronavirus vaccine (Photo: PA) © Provided by The i A nurse holds a bottle of Pfizer coronavirus vaccine (Photo: PA)

Concerns around the UK’s single-dose-first strategy stem from the fact that Pfizer/BioNTech tested their vaccine on two shots three weeks apart, which trials showed offered 90 per cent immunity.

Just before New Year the government’s independent vaccines advisory body, the JCVI, and the UK’s four chief medical officers approved a different schedule of 12 weeks between doses.

This was because the new variant first identified in Kent was causing cases to rapidly increase across the country, and amid concerns of supply shortages.

Robin Swann welcomes approval of Oxford/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

  Robin Swann welcomes approval of Oxford/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine Northern Ireland Health Minister Robin Swann welcomed the approval of the Oxford/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine.Yesterday NI Chair of the British Medical Association Dr Tom Black said that significant volumes of the new vaccine were already in Northern Ireland waiting for roll out.

Robert Jenrick has defended the Government' s strategy to leave a 12-week gap between the first and second doses of Pfizer' s Covid -19 vaccine amid fears a Dr Richard Vautrey, Chair of the BMA' s GP Committee, told Sky News this morning that they are 'in dialogue' with Prof Whitty over the 12-week

Matt Hancock said 75% of over -80 s in the UK have now had a first virus jab. Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines require two Last week, the person coordinating Israel' s Covid response reportedly suggested a single dose of the Pfizer vaccine might not be as effective as

At the time, the JCVI and CMOs insisted this new regime would still offer “substantial” protection 10 days following the first dose – 90 per cent for Pfizer and 70 per cent for the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, which did trial a 12-week gap.

‘As or more effective’

a person holding a phone: Jackie Barry, 55, a resident of The Open Hearth mens shelter, receives the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine (Photo: AFP) © Provided by The i Jackie Barry, 55, a resident of The Open Hearth mens shelter, receives the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine (Photo: AFP)

The JCVI said: “The second dose is still important to provide longer lasting protection and is expected to be as or more effective when delivered at an interval of 12 weeks from the first dose.”

However in the wake of this decision, Pfizer said it had not trialled the 12-week dosing regime, which raised concerns over its efficacy. This does not mean a 12-week gap would be ineffective or even dangerous, just that it has no evidence from clinical trials for its efficacy.

Analysis: No half measures and mind the gap - UK nod for AstraZeneca vaccine raises more questions

  Analysis: No half measures and mind the gap - UK nod for AstraZeneca vaccine raises more questions Analysis: No half measures and mind the gap - UK nod for AstraZeneca vaccine raises more questionsLONDON (Reuters) - British health officials greenlighted the AstraZeneca and Oxford COVID-19 shot on Wednesday but also rebuffed one of their central claims: that a half-dose followed by a standard dose offered more protection against infection.

This is what the UK ' s Covid -19 vaccination cards will look like. In a first wave of vaccinations , around 50 "hospital hubs" in England will begin offering the vaccine to people over 80, higher-risk The UK government has ordered 40 million doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine so far, enough to

The United Kingdom has become the first Western nation to begin vaccinating its citizens with a Pfizer/BioNTech Covid -19 shot outside of clinical trials, a landmark moment in the coronavirus pandemic.

The World Health Organisation advises three weeks between jabs.

a man sitting on a table: Man receives a covid vaccine (Photo: PA) © Provided by The i Man receives a covid vaccine (Photo: PA)

And last week a study in Israel involving 200,000 people who had had the Pfizer vaccine suggested the efficacy from the first dose could be as low as 33 per cent 14 days after the first dose.

When asked about this Israeli study last week, Sir Patrick Vallance, the government’s chief scientific adviser, said experts would look very carefully at the research, but that protection would not be expected so soon after the first dose.

‘Keep measuring and understanding’

He told the Downing St press conference that “when you get into real-world practice things are seldom quite as good as clinical trials” but that efficacy would not be as low as the Israeli research suggested.

The body’s immune system needs time to build up antibodies in response to exposure to the virus under vaccine conditions.

Sir Patrick said: “I don’t know exactly what Israel are looking at – they’re looking at the total period from day nought and that doesn’t give an exact comparison. But we need to look at this very carefully – we just need to keep measuring and understanding it.”

THOUSANDS of Americans have had bad reactions to coronavirus vaccines .
Of more than 13.7 million coronavirus vaccine doses administered between mid-December 2020 and mid-January 2021, there were 6,994 reports of adverse events submitted to the CDC's reporting system.Nearly 7,000 people had an 'adverse event' after being given either the Pfizer-BioNTech or the Moderna shot, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed on Friday.

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