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Health & Fitness Denmark to permanently stop AstraZeneca vaccine, but will other countries follow suit?

10:05  15 april  2021
10:05  15 april  2021 Source:   express.co.uk

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DENMARK is the first European Union country to permanently ban the use of the Oxford/ AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine , but will other countries follow suit ? The country originally paused the use of the vaccine for three weeks to March 25, with less than 150,000 people in Denmark receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine . The Danish Health Authority has scheduled a briefing about the AstraZeneca for Thursday at 2pm, with sources indicating the country will permanently withdraw the AstraZeneca vaccine from the country ’s Covid vaccination programme.

Denmark has ceased giving the Oxford- AstraZeneca Covid vaccine amid concerns about rare cases of blood clots, the first European country to do so fully. The move is expected to delay the country 's vaccination programme by several weeks. Drug watchdog the European Medicines Agency last Most have now resumed vaccinations with AstraZeneca , but often with limits to older age groups. On Tuesday, the US, Canada and the European Union paused the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for similar reasons over clotting. South Africa has also paused its use, despite the Johnson & Johnson being its

Denmark is the first country in the EU to drop the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine from its COVID-19 inoculation program, amid concerns over its serious side effects. The decision was made following reports of rare blood clots in some recipients. The Danish health authority said the link is "rare but serious".

Denmark is a country of 5.8 million people and has reported 238,869 coronavirus cases so far.

Of those cases, 2,446 people died and so far, 883,375 people have been vaccinated against the virus.

Overall, 77 percent of those vaccinated received the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, 7.8 percent Moderna and 15.3 percent the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

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Shortly after Denmark 's announcement, Iceland and Norway followed suit and stopped administering the vaccine . Italy also moved on Thursday to ban a batch of the AstraZeneca vaccine following reports "of some serious adverse effects." The country 's medicine regulator stressed, however, that there was currently no established link between the alleged The probe is being carried out by corresponding agencies in other EU- countries as well as the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The EMA is in charge of the evaluation and supervision of medicinal products across the 27-member EU.

Denmark will become the first EU country to permanently discontinue use of AstraZeneca ’s coronavirus vaccine , according to reports. The decision, which follows a Tuesday statement by the Danish Medicines Agency that there was a link between the jab and blood clots, will delay Copenhagen received about 1.5m vaccines under the EU’s joint procurement programme and used about 1.3m doses. 202,920 of those jabs were AstraZeneca with almost 1.2m being Pfizer. If the decision to stop using AstraZeneca completely is confirmed later today, Denmark will go further than

Denmark first suspended the use of the AstraZeneca jab on March 11 and has now decided to "continue the rollout of its vaccination programme, without AstraZeneca".

The country originally paused the use of the vaccine for three weeks to March 25, with less than 150,000 people in Denmark receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine.

The Danish Health Authority has scheduled a briefing about the AstraZeneca for Thursday at 2pm, with sources indicating the country will permanently withdraw the AstraZeneca vaccine from the country's Covid vaccination programme.

Instead, the country is offering its citizens the Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines.

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graphical user interface, text: AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccines © GETTY AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccines a tray of food on a table: AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccines © GETTY AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccines

Last week, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced the unusual blood clots would be considered as a very rare side effect of the vaccine.

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Denmark has become the first country to permanently halt the use of AstraZeneca ’s COVID-19 vaccine following its possible link to very rare cases of blood clots. The Danish Health Authority said on Wednesday that following its own review the country ’s vaccine rollout would continue without the AstraZeneca jab, as it warned of a “real risk of severe side effects.” Last week, the European Union drug regulator said that “unusual blood clots” should be listed as a “very rare” side effect of the AstraZeneca vaccine , but insisted the benefits of the shot still outweighed the risks.

AstraZeneca ’s increasingly scrutinized Covid-19 vaccine has been permanently discontinued in Denmark following investigations that linked the jabs to rare blood clotting. “Our overall assessment is there is a real risk of severe side effects associated with using the COVID-19 vaccine from AstraZeneca ,” Danish Health Authority Director General Soeren Brostroem claimed, explaining the decision. He added that the country has other vaccines to distribute, while he considers that the epidemic is currently under control.

The agency said it had come to its conclusion on the COVID-19 vaccine after taking into consideration all available evidence.

The EMA reminded people the side effects are extremely rare and most cases have been reported in women under the age of 60.

The move came as UK Government advisers said Britons aged 19 to 29 will be offered an alternative to the AstraZeneca vaccine.

a man and a woman standing in front of a table: AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Health officials © GETTY AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Health officials

Asked whether the AstraZeneca vaccine was safe, Dr Martin Michaelis, from the University of Kent, told Express.co.uk: "This depends on what you mean by safe. If you mean that there cannot be any risk associated with a drug or a vaccine, this is an unrealistic expectation.

"All drugs and vaccines have some side effects. An overdose of paracetamol can be deadly.

"Thousands of individuals die from aspirin. The use of oral contraceptives (the 'Pill') is associated with an enhanced risk of blood clots (thrombosis).

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" Denmark 's vaccination campaign will go ahead without the AstraZeneca vaccine ," Danish Health Authority director Soren Brostrom told a press conference. The European Union's drug watchdog said last week it had found a possible link between the vaccine and very rare blood clot cases, though A spate of countries across the world, including France and Germany, have resumed administering the shot to some age groups, mostly those above 50 or 60. Denmark , a country of 5.8 million people, is in the process of reopening schools, restaurants, shopping malls and cultural activities, after the daily

The country has “chosen to continue the vaccination program for all target groups without this vaccine ,” Soren Brostroem, the director of the Danish Health Authority, announced Wednesday in a move that’s expected to delay immunization by about three weeks. While both European and British Those who have already received their first dose of the vaccine will receive their second from either Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna, according to the country ’s health authority. Key Background. Denmark was one of the first countries to suspend AstraZeneca , pausing its use on March 11 after reports of

"Hence, the question is whether the benefit of a treatment outweighs the risks or not."

He added: "Generally, the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine is very safe. It has been tested in tens of thousands of individuals in clinical trials and given to millions of patients.

"Recently, concerns have been raised about a connection between a certain form of blood clotting (thrombosis) in the brain, which is called cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

"This is a very rare condition, but it is not exactly clear how rare. Estimations are typically in the range of three to four cases per million individuals per year.

"However, other studies have suggested that this may be an underestimation and that about 15 cases per million individuals per year are more realistic."

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a man wearing a suit and tie: AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccine © GETTY AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccine

The virologist said Germany had seen the highest number of cases of any country so far.

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He told Express.co.uk: "Germany has reported 31 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in 2.7 million individuals, who had been vaccinated with the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, while 22 cases have been recorded among 18.1 million individuals in the UK.

"A difference between Germany and the UK is that the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine was originally used predominantly for younger individuals in Germany."

Professor Michaelis added: "Given the available evidence, it is impossible to decide whether the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine is responsible for the observed cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis or whether this is just a coincidence.

"In this context, it also needs to be appreciated that if you start to closely monitor a cohort of people you will see changes in the incidence of many events purely by chance.

"If you want to show a causative link, you will either need a very strong and consistent correlation and an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that you can then test.

"As far as I can see, it is still too early to say whether cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis are actually increased after vaccinations with the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine."

a man holding a wine glass: AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccination © GETTY AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: Vaccination

Which countries have restricted the use of AstraZeneca so far and may permanently ban its use?

France, Germany and the Netherlands all restricted the use of the vaccine to older people, over fears younger people are more at risk of blood clots in the wake of the EMA announcement.

France advised health officials that people aged under 55 would receive an alternative to AstraZeneca for their second shot earlier this month.

Vaccine advisers in the US have told CNN they do not foresee AstraZeneca's vaccine being used in the country.

Germany suspended the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine for those below the age of 60 at the end of last month.

Canada has also restricted the use of the vaccine to those aged over 55.

Italian health officials said the AstraZeneca vaccine should only be given to those aged 60 and above.

The Sicilian president Nello Musumeci said up to 80 percent of those offered the AstraZeneca vaccine had refused it.

Most of Holland's 11m doses of Astrazeneca Covid vaccine to go unused .
Jaap van Deldon admitted that millions of the ordered Covid-19 doses will not be needed after the government restricted its use on under-60s due to concerns about incredibly rare blood clots. It comes as the Netherlands battles soaring cases of coronavirus with new infections topping 8,000 in recent days. Intensive care doctors in the Noord-Brabant province have warned that wards at some hospitals are at breaking point. The Netherlands, alongside a number of EU countries, has crippled its own vaccine programme with a series of stops and starts in its roll-out.

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