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Health & Fitness Slow-starting Europe vaccination drive could catch up with Britain

08:05  18 april  2021
08:05  18 april  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

On the vaccination front line: ‘My father died and my husband was so ill he nearly went on a ventilator’

  On the vaccination front line: ‘My father died and my husband was so ill he nearly went on a ventilator’ Dr Louise Irvine is a GP in London and a member of Keep Our NHS PublicWe started with the over 80s. Many of our patients were very smartly dressed. One woman said that this was because it was a special occasion – not just the first time she had been out for ten months, but because she felt so happy to be getting the vaccine.

Ursula von der Leyen wearing a suit and tie: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

The European coronavirus vaccination drive could catch up with Britain 'in the coming weeks' despite a slow start plagued by delays.

Europe's vaccine roll-out was condemned as 'unacceptably slow' by the World Health Organisation earlier this month, with leaders blaming delays for 'prolonging the pandemic'.

The roll-out is now finally taking off as the EU faces soaring infection rates - with some even suggesting the mass vaccination drive could soon rival the UK.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen confirmed this week that the EU has administered 100 million doses, adding this is a 'milestone we can be proud of.'

On the vaccination frontline: ‘This is going to be like a 3000m race – neither a sprint nor a marathon’

  On the vaccination frontline: ‘This is going to be like a 3000m race – neither a sprint nor a marathon’ Dr Iain Kennedy, medical secretary of Highland local medical committee, BMA representative for the north of Scotland and a GP at Riverside Medical Practice, InvernessHowever, we’re at least four weeks behind England. The vaccine has been slow to get into the hands of GPs, and GP pratices are the experts in delivering vaccines. We’ve demonstrated this over the decades and we’ve just finished an extremely successful flu vaccine campaign at the end of last year.

Some 27 million Europeans are fully vaccinated, meaning the bloc has edged closer to its goal of having vaccinated 70 per cent of the adult population by the end of the summer.

More than 32 million Britons have received the first dose of a vaccine, and nine million have been administered both jabs.

Ursula von der Leyen wearing a suit and tie: European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen confirmed this week that the EU has administered 100 million vaccine doses, adding this is a 'milestone we can be proud of' © Provided by Daily Mail European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen confirmed this week that the EU has administered 100 million vaccine doses, adding this is a 'milestone we can be proud of' chart: Some 27 million Europeans are fully vaccinated, meaning the bloc has edged closer to its goal of having vaccinated 70 per cent of the adult population by the end of the summer © Provided by Daily Mail Some 27 million Europeans are fully vaccinated, meaning the bloc has edged closer to its goal of having vaccinated 70 per cent of the adult population by the end of the summer

But medics in Germany are currently administering around 200,000 more daily vaccines than the British, the Telegraph reported.

When will over-40s get the vaccine? Covid jab schedule explained as NHS appointments open for under-50s

  When will over-40s get the vaccine? Covid jab schedule explained as NHS appointments open for under-50s The Government said it has reached its target of offering all those aged over 50 a first jab by 15 AprilPeople in their mid to late forties are next in line to be offered vaccines – here’s who is set to get the jab next and how the process works.

The country set a new national record on Wednesday with 738,501 jabs given in a day. This compared to 547,465 jabs administered in the UK.

Around 18.5 per cent of Germans have now received the first dose of a vaccine - an increase of 12 per cent from April 1. Some 6.4 per cent are fully vaccinated.

In France, more than 450,000 jabs are now regularly given out per day following the launch of 40 mass vaccination sites.

However, the nation became the eighth to pass 100,000 Covid deaths this week, with an average of 300 people succumbing to the virus per day.

Elsewhere, in Italy, medics have continued to consistently give around 200,000 jabs per day since the end of March.

The vaccination drive got off to a slow start in Europe after the bloc failed to order enough doses and grant vaccinations swift approval.

Emmanuel Macron wearing a suit and tie: In France, more than 450,000 jabs are now regularly given out per day following the launch of 40 mass vaccination sites. Pictured: President Emmanuel Macron © Provided by Daily Mail In France, more than 450,000 jabs are now regularly given out per day following the launch of 40 mass vaccination sites. Pictured: President Emmanuel Macron chart, histogram: More than 32 million Britons have received the first dose of a vaccine, and nine million have been administered both jabs © Provided by Daily Mail More than 32 million Britons have received the first dose of a vaccine, and nine million have been administered both jabs

At the start of April, only 10 per cent of Europe's population had received a first dose, compared to nearly 60 per cent of Britons.

Coronavirus in Spain: Monthly deaths in April fall to lowest point since last summer

  Coronavirus in Spain: Monthly deaths in April fall to lowest point since last summer With less than 3,000 Covid-19 fatalities recorded for the first time in six months, health experts are cautiously optimistic about the impact of the vaccination driveAlthough the exact number of daily deaths will not be known until the Carlos III Health Institute consolidates the data – a process that usually takes three weeks – the downward trend is clear. A similar number of daily fatalities has not been recorded either by the Health Ministry or the regions since last summer.

However, despite a swift start, the roll-out of Covid vaccines to new patients in the UK has slowed to a crawl in comparison to how it performed in March.


Video: WHO warns Covid-19 infections rising exponentially, solution is ‘not vaccines only’ (France 24)

An average of 91,000 people are getting their first dose each day now after the roll-out peaked at just over 500,000 per day in the middle of last month.

The roll-out itself has managed to keep moving quickly, reaching an average 462,000 people per day over the last week, but most doses now are boosters.

A bottleneck in supplies and a need to give second jabs to millions of people who got their first in January have meant the roll-out has lost momentum.

Figures from the NHS show that 117,835 people got their first vaccine dose on Wednesday, which was up from just 59,905 on Monday but significantly lower than the one-day record of 614,930 on March 19.

The focus has switched now to second doses, with four times as many of those being administered each day – an average of 346,000.

The obstacles still ahead on the road to normality: ‘The virus will not disappear so fast, if indeed it ever does’

  The obstacles still ahead on the road to normality: ‘The virus will not disappear so fast, if indeed it ever does’ While the number of contagions is expected to fall as the Covid-19 vaccination drive progresses, epidemiologists warn restrictions and face masks will still be needed to combat the pandemic“The virus will not disappear so fast, if indeed it ever does,” warns Antoni Trill, the head of the Preventive Medicine service at the Clínic Hospital in Barcelona. “We will move toward normality, but there will still be infections,” he continues. “Instead of group immunity, we are talking in this case about a functional control of the pandemic. We are not going to be able to say goodbye to masks so quickly.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock and NHS bosses warned at the end of March that April would be a month dedicated to second doses and preserving supplies.

Although the introduction of a third vaccine, made by Moderna, has allowed some newcomers to get their first jab – the programme opened up to 45 to 49-year-olds this week – Pfizer and AstraZeneca supplies for newcomers are running low.

Medical chiefs said in a warning on March 17 that, for four weeks or more, 'volumes for first doses will be significantly constrained'.

Health chiefs have known for months that April would be the month second jab demand started to kick in.

chart, histogram © Provided by Daily Mail   Slow-starting Europe vaccination drive could catch up with Britain © Provided by Daily Mail

Everyone must get the second dose of their Covid vaccine about 12 weeks after the first, according to UK Government policy.

A total of 9.2million people were vaccinated with at least one dose by the end of January, meaning that the same amount must have had both jabs by the end of April.

So far, 8.5million people have had both doses.

Because of the need to get through these people, all supplies of Pfizer's vaccine and most of those from AstraZeneca have been preserved for follow-up jabs for these people.

This was planned for, as was a dip in supply after the initial massive deliveries from manufacturers that also have commitments to other countries.

Spanish health authorities opt to use the Janssen vaccine for the 40-49 age group

  Spanish health authorities opt to use the Janssen vaccine for the 40-49 age group The campaign will move onto this section of the population during the month of June, but Pfizer and Moderna will be used as an alternative should there be short supply of the one-shot Covid-19 medicationUntil now, citizens in Spain born from 1972 to 1981 (whatever the month) were going to be given the RNA messenger vaccines – i.e. Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech. In particular, Pfizer was due to be used given that it has been arriving in Spain in greater quantities than the others.

But the UK had hoped it would be able to steam ahead with its plans to vaccine younger people using a batch of five million extra doses of the Oxford jab due to arrive from India, as well as the first lots of Moderna jabs.

That India delivery was held up, however, putting the roll-out on the back foot.

When that was announced last month NHS clinics were sent a letter that said the number of people getting first vaccine doses would be much lower in April.

Matt Hancock said at the time that the roll-out to under-50s might have to be paused to make sure there were enough supplies to get through all the second doses that needed doing.

He said in a Downing Street press conference: 'We’re on track to offer a first dose to everyone in priority groups one to nine by April 15.

'While we deliver on that commitment, we also want to ensure that this offer reaches everyone in groups one to nine.

'At the same time as opening up offers of vaccinations to all those who are 50 or above, we are going to do whatever it takes to reach all those in the most vulnerable groups who haven’t come forward yet before we move onto the next cohort, which is people in their 40s.

'Before we forge ahead I want us to be confident that we’ve done everything we can to protect those most in need of protection and we will do all we can and do everything necessary to deliver the supplies that are contractually committed to protecting people in this country.'

The Government said it successfully hit the target of offering vaccines to everyone over the age of 50, with a long-term health condition, or who was a health or social care worker, by April 15.

This week it expanded the offer of first vaccine doses to people aged between 45 and 49.

Mr Hancock said the roll-out would expand to everyone in their forties 'in line with supplies'.

Read more

Routine childhood vaccinations plummeted during early days of pandemic .
Childhood vaccinations dropped during the spring 2020 lockdowns, the CDC finds. Vaccination rates for diphtheria, tetanus, measles, and other diseases fell up to 60%.Vaccination rates for children under two years old fell by about 20 percent while rates for older children fell by over 60 percent between March and May 2020 

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