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Health & Fitness Number of children with dental decay is set to soar

05:25  09 may  2021
05:25  09 may  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Training. Salary, required qualities… Four questions on the profession of dental surgeon

 Training. Salary, required qualities… Four questions on the profession of dental surgeon © ARCHIVES MARC ROGER / OUEST-FRANCE A dentist must have good interpersonal skills to reassure patients. He or she treats all generations of patients, takes care of dental pathologies and also does prevention. One reaches the profession of dental surgeon through a very selective course of study. The profession is intended for rigorous people with great dexterity. How do I become a dentist? Practicing the profession of dentist requires obtaining the state diploma of doctor of dental surgery.

The number of children hospitalised because of their rotting teeth is set to soar because of lockdown restrictions. Dental decay is already the biggest reason for youngsters aged between five and nine being admitted for surgery – with levels running at more than double the rate for tonsillitis. Matthew Garrett, head of the Royal College of Surgeons’ dental faculty, said: ‘It is likely that lockdown will have had a damaging effect on children ’s oral health, with reduced access to routine dental treatment and disrupted routines which could undermine brushing habits.’

The number of children in England waiting longer than six months for a dental operation under general anaesthesia has risen by 52% over the past three years, data provided by NHS trusts suggests. Jon Ashworth, the shadow health minister, said: “It is completely unacceptable that vulnerable children are increasingly waiting for months in agony to have their teeth fixed. “We’ve also heard horrific stories of people forced to resort to DIY dentistry kits in utter desperation. In the fifth-richest nation in the world, this is a damning indictment of Tory neglect of our health service.”

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The number of children hospitalised because of their rotting teeth is set to soar because of lockdown restrictions.

Dental decay is already the biggest reason for youngsters aged between five and nine being admitted for surgery – with levels running at more than double the rate for tonsillitis.

Experts warn that the situation is now set to worsen.

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Some 23.4 per cent of five-year-olds across England show signs of tooth decay and this figure appears poised for a steep rise.

Matthew Garrett, head of the Royal College of Surgeons’ dental faculty, said: ‘It is likely that lockdown will have had a damaging effect on children’s oral health, with reduced access to routine dental treatment and disrupted routines which could undermine brushing habits.’

Trend Dry Brushing: Should we brush our teeth now without toothpaste?

 Trend Dry Brushing: Should we brush our teeth now without toothpaste? For about three years, the US has been getting a new beauty and hygiene trend through social networks - the speech is from the dry brushing. This term is already known in the skin care for a long time, with the brushing of dry skin with high-quality brushes, which are equipped with natural bristles, for example, from Ross or wild boar hair. Now this trend is also over-speeded in the area of ​​the oral and dental hygiene.

The number of children have to wait more than half a year for hospital dental treatment has risen 52 per cent, Labour has revealed. In 2017, under-18s waited on average an additional 15 days for dental operations compared with 2013. The worst performance was seen by Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust – where children waited 253 days for treatment on average. Tooth decay is the number one reason for child hospital admissions in England. The latest data shows there were just under 43,000 extractions of multiple teeth in under-18s in England in 2016/17, at a cost of £36.2

Most children , however, do not have dental sealants, especially children from low-income families. These children are twice as likely as higher-income children to have untreated tooth decay . • Providing sealants through school-based programs is an effective way to increase sealant use. The mean number of decayed and filled first molars (DFFM) was estimated for children with and without sealants. Averted tooth decay resulting from increasing sealant use prevalence was also estimated.

As check-ups continue with Covid-secure precautions in place, an NHS spokesman said: ‘Activity has increased steadily since services reopened last summer.’

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Dentists warn PPE rules will have 'serious consequences' .
British Dental Association today warned arduous rules were leading to ever-longer waiting lists because fewer patients could be seen than before the pandemic began.Current guidance says around 20 minutes 'fallow' time must be left between patient examinations to stop the virus being transmitted. Dentists must also wear PPE.

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