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Health & Fitness Nearly a third of UK adults are unpaid carers for friends and family with illnesses or disabilities

19:50  07 june  2021
19:50  07 june  2021 Source:   msn.com

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Nearly a third of UK adults have unpaid caring responsibilities for a family member or friend due to illness, prompting campaigners to call on ministers to provide them with greater support.

a person wearing a military uniform: 30 per cent of Brits say they have unpaid caring roles looking after close friends or relatives who have illnesses or disabilities (Photo: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire) © Provided by The i 30 per cent of Brits say they have unpaid caring roles looking after close friends or relatives who have illnesses or disabilities (Photo: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)

A Savanta/Liberal Democrats poll shared with i shows that 30 per cent of Brits say they are taking on caring responsibilities for close friends or relatives who have illnesses or disabilities.

The figure leaps to nearly half – 46 per cent – among 18 to 24 year olds, who say they have unpaid caring roles, giving a glimpse of a hidden army of young carers in Britain.

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The poll of more than 2,000 adults has led Lib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey to call on the Government to give those caring for loved ones better support and allow them to take time off.

“Unpaid carers have taken on dramatically increased caring responsibilities during the pandemic. Many carers haven’t been able to take a single break since the pandemic started. Most are simply exhausted,” Sir Ed said, who cares along with his wife for their disabled son.

“The government must finally recognise the incredible contribution that unpaid carers make and give them the support they deserve. It must give local councils the emergency funding they need to give carers a break.”

It follows research published yesterday by Carers UK, which found that 72 per cent of people caring unpaid for family or friends have not had any breaks from their caring role at all over the course of the pandemic.

The six charities supporting Carers Week – Carers UK, Age UK, Carers Trust, Motor Neurone Disease Association, Oxfam GB and Rethink Mental Illness – are calling on the UK Government to provide £1.2 billion of funding for unpaid carers’ breaks, so that those providing upwards of 50 hours of care are able to take time off for their own health and wellbeing.

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usr: 1
This is interesting!