•   
  •   

Health & Fitness More work, less sleep: How Covid lockdowns changed our behaviour

19:59  23 june  2021
19:59  23 june  2021 Source:   cityam.com

8 ways to stop hay fever ruining your sleep

  8 ways to stop hay fever ruining your sleep Are seasonal allergies impacting your sleep? Why not give these tips a go"More than 20% of the UK population suffer from allergies that can be triggered by a range of things in our bedrooms, including dust mites, mould and bacteria," Steve Adams, CEO at Mattress Online, says. "As online searches are increasing between midnight and four am for 'hay fever sleep', it suggests that many Brits are kept awake by our allergies.

a person lying on a bed © Provided by City AM

People in the UK were spending more time working and less time sleeping a year into lockdown than before the pandemic, a new survey suggests.

How we spent our time “changed substantially” between the first lockdown in March 2020 and after a year of Covid restrictions in March 2021, according to new data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

Despite the mass adoption of remote working, the ONS found the biggest change in the UK’s behaviour after a year in lockdown was the time they spent working from home – which increased by an average of 18 minutes in the last year.

ONS surveyed the same group of adults in March 2020 and at the end of March 2021, and found they on average spent 23 minutes less time sleeping a year into the pandemic. They also spent eight minutes less on computer games or watching TV, and four minutes less on eating.

How to keep fit with Apple Watch: A complete guide to the Activity and Workout apps

  How to keep fit with Apple Watch: A complete guide to the Activity and Workout apps How to keep fit with Apple Watch: A complete guide to the Activity and Workout appsThis feature covers everything you need to know about the Apple Watch and its fitness features, from making sure you select the right workout and changing your Move goal, to competing with friends and using third-party fitness apps with it.


Video: Mongooses rear young in ‘a fair society’ solving inequality problems, research reveals (The Independent)

Less time was also spent playing with children and helping them with homework, which the ONS pointed out was “likely to reflect the reopening of schools”. In total, parents spent 30 minutes less on childcare a year into the pandemic.

As restrictions eased slightly after the first lockdown, people were “spending more time outside, whether travelling, socialising or shopping” in March 2021 than at the start of the pandemic – as activities like meeting for a coffee in a park with one person were permitted by this stage.

Notably, the ONS found that most people didn’t change their lifestyles much after receiving a dose of the Covid vaccine.

The 3 Major Ways to Tell If You’re Actually Sleep Deprived

  The 3 Major Ways to Tell If You’re Actually Sleep Deprived It can happen more quickly than you think'Ugh, I’m so sleep deprived,' says everyone. All day, every day.

The data from March 2021 showed there were no huge differences in the changes in behaviour between people who had and had not had a dose of the Covid vaccine.

The ONS also cited more recent data from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey in June that showed most people with a vaccine reported they did not see others from outside of their household any more frequently than they did before they received their vaccine.

The post More work, less sleep: How Covid lockdowns changed our behaviour appeared first on CityAM.

Chernobyl's liquidators didn’t pass on radiation damage to their children .
Exposure to Chernobyl radiation increased the risk of thyroid cancer by breaking DNA strands, but the effects didn't carry to the next generation.The new research is a step forward in understanding the mechanisms that drive human thyroid cancer, said Stephen Chanock, the director of the division of cancer epidemiology and genetics at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the senior author on both research papers. It's also reassuring for those exposed to radiation in events such as the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster and who plan to start families, Chanock told Live Science.

usr: 0
This is interesting!