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Health & Fitness Over 50s and clinically vulnerable will be offered Pfizer booster shot

14:04  01 august  2021
14:04  01 august  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Pfizer working on version of vaccine that could be stored in fridge

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Third dose of Pfizer vaccine boosts antibodies up to 11-fold against the Indian 'Delta' variant as study finds efficacy of standard two shots drops to 84% after six months.

Now all those aged 50 and over as well as the clinically vulnerable are set to recieve a Pfizer booster shot as part of the Government's new vaccination drive. This push to get the most at risk from Covid vaccinated comes as the majority of adults have now recieved at least one dose of the vaccine. The vaccine programme is set to start this September, all those eligible will be encouraged to take up the jab. Despite fears over the effectiveness of existing vaccines against new variants a new study has revealled a third dose of Pfizer offers strong protection against the delta variant.

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Tens of millions of Britons will be offered a Pfizer booster jab this autumn as the vaccine has proved to be the most effective against the Delta variant.

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Israel’s prime minister has announced that the country would offer a coronavirus booster shot to those people over 60 who have already been vaccinated. The announcement by Naftali Bennett makes Israel, which launched one of the world’s most successful vaccination drives earlier this year, the first country to offer a third dose of a western vaccine to its citizens on a wide scale. Anyone over 60 who was vaccinated more than five months ago will be eligible. Bennett said the country’s new president, Isaac Herzog, would be the first to get the booster on Friday. It will also be offered to the general public.

Pfizer and the German firm BioNTech announced Thursday they plan to seek regulatory clearance for a booster shot within weeks, predicting that people would require a vaccine boost six to 12 months after being fully immunized. Hours later, the Department of Health and Human Services issued an emphatic rebuke In the United Kingdom, the National Health Service has outlined plans for booster shots to begin in September, targeted first to groups that include people who are immunosuppressed, people older than 70 and front-line health-care workers. Eventually, its boosters will be offered to people

The booster scheme, which was announced earlier this year, is set to start in September and should see 23million over-50s, vulnerable Britons and NHS and care home staff offered a third dose.

Extra vaccines would be rolled out in two stages — prioritising those most at risk of Covid, before the programme is extended.

While patients were initially expected to be offered the jab they were originally inoculated with, it is understood all patients will be offered the Pfizer jab as it has proven to be the most effective against the Delta variant.

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Over 50 . On Wednesday, Pfizer published data showing a third dose of its coronavirus vaccine can "strongly" [+] boost protection against the delta variant. Israel's Health Ministry announced Thursday their plans to begin providing coronavirus boosters to adults over the age of 60 who had

Israel will begin offering a third shot of the Pfizer /Biontech COVID-19 vaccine to people aged over 60, a world first in efforts to slow the spread of the highly contagious Delta variant, Israeli TV and radio said on Thursday. Those eligible will be able to get the booster shot as long as they received their second dose more than five months ago, Channel 13 TV and Kan public radio reported. Israel was a world leader in the vaccination rollout, with many seniors getting their jabs in December, January and February as they were regarded as the most vulnerable sector of the population.

The Department of Health has yet to confirm the official details of the booster scheme, plans of which were first shared by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) in June.

The JCVI is expected to issue its final advice in regards to the booster scheme in the coming months.

chart, histogram: 185598815 © Provided by Daily Mail 185598815 chart, histogram © Provided by Daily Mail

A senior government source also told the Times that those who received the AstraZeneca vaccine would 'be getting an mRNA booster'.

MRNA is a type of vaccine and applies to the Pfizer and Oxford jabs while AstraZeneca is not an mRNA jab.

A UK Government-backed study published earlier this year found that mixing and matching Covid vaccines may result in higher protection against the virus.

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Residents who are over 50 , are obese or have chronic illnesses now are being urged to get another shot six months after their full Sinopharm vaccination—with the Pfizer -BioNTech shot . The government’s BeAware app allows users to book a Sinopharm booster shot , but says that Pfizer -BioNTech is recommended for more- vulnerable population groups. Sinopharm and other Chinese vaccines have become key tools of Beijing’s international diplomacy, especially in developing nations unable to secure sufficient doses of U. S . and European-made shots .

Israel will begin offering a third shot of the Pfizer -BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to people aged over 60 who have already been vaccinated, the country’s prime minister announced on Thursday, becoming the first country to offer a third booster dose to its citizens. Those eligible will be able to get the booster shot as long as they received their second dose more than five months ago, Channel 13 TV and Kan public radio reported. Israel was a world leader in the vaccination rollout, with many seniors getting their jabs in December, January and February as they were regarded as the most vulnerable section of

People who had been vaccinated with AstraZeneca's jab initially and then received a top-up with Pfizer's had nine times more antibodies than those who stuck to the UK vaccine.

Although antibodies are just one part of the immune response, the Oxford University researchers said the findings strongly suggested the approach could enhance immunity.

But it is understood the mix and match approach is not going to be used in the short term more broadly because there is a 'strong supply' of each vaccine type.

A senior HSE source told the Times: 'Currently there's no need for it. Currently we have plenty of vaccines. The amount of vaccine isn't an issue at all. There's no plan to do it. It's not under immediate consideration, but I wouldn't rule it out.'

The Government said analysis has shown that the Pfizer vaccine is 96 per cent effective against the Delta variant while the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine is 92 per cent effective against hospitalisation after 2 doses.

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Which jab combinations provided the best protection?

The early results from the Com-Cov trial, published today in the Lancet, looked at the efficacy of either two doses of Pfizer, two of AstraZeneca, or one of them followed by the other.

All second doses were given four weeks apart and the trial recruited 830 volunteers who were aged 50 and above.  All combinations worked well, priming the immune system.

It found:

— AstraZeneca's vaccine, followed by Pfizer's, induced higher levels of antibodies and T cells than vice versa.

— Both antibodies and T cells, a type of white blood cell, play a crucial role in defending against Covid.

— The mix-match approach produced more antibodies than two regular doses of AstraZeneca's, no matter which way round the jabs were given.

— The largest antibody levels were induced after two doses of Pfizer, and the highest T cell response was from AstraZeneca's followed by Pfizer.

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A study published this week also showed that a third dose of the Pfizer vaccine could offer strong protection against the Delta variant.

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Research showed that antibody levels increased five-fold among people ages 18 to 55 who were given the booster shot.

The third dose was especially effecting for the elderly, with antibody levels spiking 11-fold among people aged 65 to 85 who had already received the standard two doses.

In the slides published online, the researchers wrote there there is 'estimated potential for up to 100-fold increase in Delta neutralization post-dose three compared to pre-dose three.'

The booster roll-out will coincide with the annual influenza inoculation programme, which health officials said will be vital this winter amid warnings of a difficult flu season.

Immunity gained from Covid jabs last for at least six months in the 'majority' of cases, but there are fears this could fade later in the year which could trigger a spike in hospitalisations and deaths.

An Oxford University trial looking at booster doses suggested a third shot six months after the second could restore peak immunity against Covid.

It comes as the week-on-week rate of Covid cases fell yesterday for the tenth day in a row with 26,144 infections marking a 17.8 per cent fall while deaths also fell to 71.

Experts Push Back Against Rush for COVID Booster Shots

  Experts Push Back Against Rush for COVID Booster Shots FRIDAY, Sept. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Opposition is mounting among U.S. and international health experts against President Joe Biden's push to make COVID-19 booster shots available later this month. The scientific evidence simply isn't there to support booster shots, and those doses would be better used in the arms of the unvaccinated around the world to prevent future mutations of COVID, infectious disease experts said in an interview with HealthDay Now."The important thing to remember is this is being driven by the unvaccinated. That's what's in the hospital right now. It's not vaccinated people that are the issue in this pandemic," said Dr.

The latest data from Public Health England and Cambridge University suggests that about 60,000 deaths, 22 million infections and 52,600 hospitalisations have been prevented by vaccines.

The Government plans to lure young people in for their vaccinations with the promise of cut-price taxis and takeaways, as Boris Johnson tries to tackle the relatively low take-up among the under-30s.

Uber, Deliveroo and Pizza Pilgrims are among the companies in discussion with the Government about offering incentives as part of the 'Jab 18-30' drive.

So far, only two-thirds of people in that age bracket in England have received a first dose since they became eligible in June, compared with 88.4 per cent across all age groups, meaning more than three million 18-to-30-year-olds remain unjabbed.

Read more

Experts Push Back Against Rush for COVID Booster Shots .
FRIDAY, Sept. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Opposition is mounting among U.S. and international health experts against President Joe Biden's push to make COVID-19 booster shots available later this month. The scientific evidence simply isn't there to support booster shots, and those doses would be better used in the arms of the unvaccinated around the world to prevent future mutations of COVID, infectious disease experts said in an interview with HealthDay Now."The important thing to remember is this is being driven by the unvaccinated. That's what's in the hospital right now. It's not vaccinated people that are the issue in this pandemic," said Dr.

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