•   
  •   

Health & Fitness Father makes birth of first child thanks to heart transplant

16:50  20 september  2021
16:50  20 september  2021 Source:   indy100.com

U.S. Kidney Transplant Outcomes Are Improving

  U.S. Kidney Transplant Outcomes Are Improving TUESDAY, Aug. 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some hopeful news for those who have kidney transplants: Long-term survival rates have improved over the past three decades, a review shows. "There has been a gratifying improvement in kidney transplant survival, both for patients and the kidney graft itself, from 1996 to the current era," said review author Dr. Sundaram Hariharan, a senior transplant nephrologist at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The five-year survival rate of recipients who received kidneys from deceased donors increased from about 66% in 1996–1999 to just over 78% in 2012–2015. Survival increased from 79.

A young father diagnosed with a serious heart condition was able to witness the birth of his first child thanks to a transplant.

a man holding a laptop: Ross Peters holding new baby © Provided by Indy 100 Ross Peters holding new baby

Ross Peters, from Dundee was 21 when he was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy – a disease of the heart muscle which affects its ability to pump blood around the body.

Five years later, during lockdown, his health deteriorated and he was readmitted to hospital where he was told he was too sick to leave.

His wife Shauni was pregnant with their first child and Mr Peters feared he would miss the birth.

a woman holding a baby posing for the camera: Ross Peters was able to witness the birth of his first child thanks to a heart transplant (Handout/PA) © Provided by Indy 100 Ross Peters was able to witness the birth of his first child thanks to a heart transplant (Handout/PA)

After eight weeks in hospital he was granted a transplant, and was by his wife’s side four months later when son Louis was born.

Cleveland Clinic will stop organ transplants for the unvaccinated

  Cleveland Clinic will stop organ transplants for the unvaccinated The Cleveland Clinic will no longer offer people who are not vaccinated to receive organ transplants or to do a live donation. This is to protect people post-surgery from the virus.The hospital says the reason for the policy change is the immunosuppressant drugs transplant recipients must take after receiving a new organ so their body does not reject it.

Speaking about his life-saving transplant, Mr Peters said: “It sounds funny but I felt this warm feeling go through my body, as if a weight was being lifted.

“All I could think about was being out for Louis’s birth, which I didn’t think would happen.

“After the transplant I took each day at a time, step by step, working up to being able to carry the baby out of the hospital – which I did.

“I take 15 tablets every day but I roll out of bed – I can do anything I set my mind to, nothing stops me.

“Now, I can raise my son and none of that would have been possible without a heart transplant.”

Ahead of Organ Donation Week, which runs from September 20-26, he added: “I’m so grateful to my donor, and thankful to everyone at the Golden Jubilee who supported my family and I during this time.”

'I spent five years waiting for a kidney transplant, but now I can finally enjoy my life'

  'I spent five years waiting for a kidney transplant, but now I can finally enjoy my life' Organ donor stories: 19-year-old Simran Sahajpal tells how she waited five years for a kidney transplant before going through the operation during the pandemic.As the latest statistic shows, thousands of people are still on the hunt, and 19-year-old psychology student Simran from Walsall in the West Midlands waited five years for a kidney transplant. One year since her operation, she bravely shared her story with HELLO!.

Dr Jane Cannon, NHS Golden Jubilee consultant transplant cardiologist, said: “Sometimes people are so unwell when they come here that they can end up on the urgent heart transplant waiting list.

“This means that they don’t leave hospital until they receive a new heart.

“In some cases, patients can get to a stage that they rely on machines to keep them alive until a suitable organ is found.

“Often the realisation of how unwell they were only registers when they are in better physical health – that realisation can be very dramatic and affects people in different ways.

“When patients go home post-transplant, everyday activities, such as getting up and opening the curtains or going for a walk, can really bring home the fact that they have been given the gift of life from people who have donated their organs.

“So it is important that you make your wishes known to your loved ones so that they can honour your wishes should the time come.”

Covid vaccine: Stem cell transplant patients who must be completely re-vaccinated struggling to book jabs

  Covid vaccine: Stem cell transplant patients who must be completely re-vaccinated struggling to book jabs Two of those affected by apparent ignorance of the Green Book guidelines have told i the challenges have made them fear they will have to shield againPeople who receive stem cell transplants effectively have their immune system replaced, meaning they need to get all their vaccinations again, including childhood immunisations and Covid-19 jabs.

a person sleeping on a bed: Ross Peters in NHS Golden Jubilee after receiving his heart transplant © Provided by Indy 100 Ross Peters in NHS Golden Jubilee after receiving his heart transplant

NHS Golden Jubilee provides regional and national heart and lung services for NHS Scotland.

The hospital’s team has performed 36 heart transplants since the onset of the pandemic for patients from across the country.

In March, the Human Tissue (Authorisation) (Scotland) Act 2019 – passed by the Scottish Parliament in July 2019 – came into effect.

The legislation provides for a “deemed authorisation” or opt-out system of organ and tissue donation for transplantation.

This means that if you have not opted out when you die, the law allows for the donation of certain organs and tissue for transplantation.

This does not apply if you are in an excluded group or it has been established that this would be against your views.

From news to politics, travel to sport, culture to climate – The Independent has a host of free newsletters to suit your interests. To find the stories you want to read, and more, in your inbox, click here.

Hairdresser, 32, trying to track down father she has never met .
Sarah Langdale (pictured left in hospital and inset as a child), lives with severe aplastic anaemia. Sarah's mother, Lorraine (right), met the man near the family home in Northampton in 1988.Sarah Langdale, 32, lives with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) - a condition where bone marrow and stem cells do not produce enough blood cells.

usr: 0
This is interesting!