•   
  •   

Health & Fitness Headteachers ‘worried’ about rest of autumn term as more than one in 10 pupils off with Covid at some schools

11:25  25 september  2021
11:25  25 september  2021 Source:   msn.com

Top 3 autumn/winter trends for 2021, according to Etsy

  Top 3 autumn/winter trends for 2021, according to Etsy Find out what we'll be filling our homes with.Not sure what to get your hands on first? Whether you're redecorating or want to snap up some new accessories, take a look at the trends below...

Headteachers have said they are “worried” about the rest of the autumn term after some schools reported having more than one in 10 pupils not in class due to Covid.

Data from Public Health England already suggests that the case rate for 10 to 19-year-olds is running nearly three times the average for all ages.

With about 122,500 off school last week because of the coronavirus, the Association of School and College Leaders told i it was worried that “attendance may further unravel as the autumn term progresses”.

Geoff Barton, ASCL’s general secretary, said: “We are hearing of schools with high levels of pupil absence because of coronavirus infections with some reports of 10 per cent or more of pupils out of school.

New data reveals deprived pupils were 'failed' by Zoom lessons

  New data reveals deprived pupils were 'failed' by Zoom lessons Figures showed the difference between remote and in-class learning during the pandemic was 'particularly acute' at schools with a higher proportion pupils eligible for free school meals.The difference between remote and in-class learning during the pandemic was 'particularly acute' at schools with a higher proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM), the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said.

“The impact is exacerbated by staff members also catching Covid even though the vast majority will have been vaccinated. All of this is hugely disruptive and worrying.”

In Cumbria, it was announced that children will have to self-isolate at home if their sibling tests positive for coronavirus, as the local authority stepped up up measures to tackle soaring cases in the county.

Rates of Covid among 12-to 18-year-olds are 1,431 per 100,000 people – double the already rate of 756 for teenagers across England. Among 5 to 11-year-olds in Cumbria it is 1,106 per 100,000. Cases among all age groups are rising faster in the county than anywhere else in England.

Self-isolation rules for households were relaxed in August, with anyone living with someone who tests positive for covid not required to quarantine if they have been fully vaccinated or are under 18.

CDC claims schools with no mask mandates had 3.5 times MORE cases

  CDC claims schools with no mask mandates had 3.5 times MORE cases A new CDC report found that, of 191 COVID-19 outbreaks, 59.2% were among schools with no mandate compared to 8.4 percent% in schools that had one before the year began.Researchers from the federal health agency looked at case rates at nearly 1,000 K-12 schools in Arizona that did or did not require students to wear face coverings.

But Cumbria County Council’s director of public health, Colin Cox, said the authority had to increase restrictions to stem the rise in transmission.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Read More - Featured Image © Provided by The i Read More - Featured Image

Siblings of children who test positive will also have to take a PCR test three to five days after that first case, before returning to school if they are negative.

Mr Cox said: “We’re issuing this new guidance in a bid to halt the spread of Covid-19 amongst school-age children and allow time for the 12-15 vaccine rollout to take effect.”

Paul Whiteman, the general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, said that school leaders feared that the season was against them.

“In many ways, schools are finding it every bit as challenging this term as they were this time last year,” he said.

“There’s a worry about worse to come as the weather becomes colder and wetter. School leaders are definitely going to be worried about enough of their workforce staying healthy to maintain the quality of education.”

Gavin Williamson pleads with families to ensure pupils take tests

  Gavin Williamson pleads with families to ensure pupils take tests Parents must take responsibility for stopping their teenagers getting 'carried away' as Covid restrictions are lifted, Gavin Williamson has said. The Education Secretary said preventing a fourth wave of the disease was ‘not just a matter for schools’.He argued that families had the biggest influence over their children and urged parents to ensure youngsters were getting tested.It comes amid fears teenagers will spark another Covid crisis this autumn if they fail to test themselves while mixing at school and socially.

He added: “There’s definitely already some significant issues arising at a local level with pupil attendance.”

This week, NHS vaccine teams began delivering the jab to healthy 12-to 15-year-olds in schools.

The Government said the rollout of the vaccine to this age group was “a significant step in building the walls of protection from the virus across society” which would help “minimise” disruption to education.

Mr Barton said that while heads were “hopeful” about the programme, ministers should back it up with “a public information campaign to encourage twice-weekly home testing among pupils in the appropriate age groups, invest in ventilation systems in schools and colleges, and make sure the NHS Test and Trace system is operating as intended”.

He said that heads did “not yet have an indication of the take-up of vaccinations among 12 to 15-year-olds”, but said that survey data suggested around 86 per cent of families were likely to vaccinate their child.

“We sincerely hope the anti-vaccination campaign has not dented those figures,” he added.

‘School gate’ measures curbed Covid transmission in classrooms even as Delta surged, new study shows .
Rapid testing, bubbles and staff vaccinations helped stop schools becoming 'hubs of infection' in third wave, according to Public Health England“School gate” measures – including rapid and widespread asymptomatic testing, high uptake of vaccination among staff, and bubbles and the isolation system – meant classrooms were not “hubs of infection” even as the third wave took hold, Public Health England said.

usr: 0
This is interesting!