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Health & Fitness Heart attack victim in Victoria forced to wait SIX HOURS in ambulance: Frankston Hospital Covid

17:44  20 july  2022
17:44  20 july  2022 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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  Women battling chest pains driven 300 miles to London hospital Dr Alison Durkin, 61, was driven 300 miles to Charing Cross Hospital to be seen for chest pains because of 30-ambulance queues outside her local A&E at Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro by paramedics.She was forced to wait outside A&E in an ambulance for six hours because there was no room for medics to hand her over.After sitting in a queue of 30 ambulances, Dr Durkin was eventually admitted before being discharged by a junior doctor who suggested she had Covid. She tested negative the next day but her symptoms kept getting worse.

A grandfather having a heart attack was forced to wait six hours in an ambulance before he could get a hospital bed, with an influx of Covid patients being blamed for the delay.

Russell Chambers, 71, from Melbourne's southeast woke at 4am on Monday morning struggling to breathe so his wife Glenys called triple-0.

Paramedics rushed to the scene and ran tests before telling Mr Chambers he was going into cardiac arrest.

He was put in an ambulance and raced to Frankston Hospital only to find there were eight other ambulances queued up before them.

Glenys and Russell Chambers were forced to wait in the back of ambulance for six hours while Russell was having a heart attack © Provided by Daily Mail Glenys and Russell Chambers were forced to wait in the back of ambulance for six hours while Russell was having a heart attack Frankston Hospital had at least nine ambulances banked up waiting to admit patients in the early hours of Monday morning © Provided by Daily Mail Frankston Hospital had at least nine ambulances banked up waiting to admit patients in the early hours of Monday morning

This meant they had to wait until 11am to be admitted with the ambulance and paramedics unable to attend any other emergencies during that time.

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Ms Chambers, 71, voiced her fury at the life-threatening situation saying it should never happen in Australia.

'My anger is the hold-up of the ambulances,' she told Seven News.

'It shouldn't be happening in this country.

'The staff are so under the pump and they are the ones that cop it.

'I believe it has to go to the top and be fixed.'

Victorian Premier Dan Andrews has promised to fix the problems bedeviling the state's health system   © Provided by Daily Mail Victorian Premier Dan Andrews has promised to fix the problems bedeviling the state's health system Victorian hospitals are facing a new surge of Covid cases with over 900 currently in hospital  © Provided by Daily Mail Victorian hospitals are facing a new surge of Covid cases with over 900 currently in hospital

She also said Mr Chambers was expected to make a full recovery.


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A government spokesperson offered an apology over the incident but pinned most of the blame on Covid.

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'Every health system around the country has been under unprecedented pressure and we're investing billions to get it back on track as quickly as possible, manage the ongoing impacts of the global pandemic, staff furloughs and the flu while also supporting our healthcare workers,' he said.

'While every effort is made to prioritise those patients with the most critical need, we know it can be challenging when there are delays to treatment or longer than expected wait times – and we apologise to Glenys and her husband for any distress during this difficult time.'

Glenys Chambers expressed her fury at the situation that saw her husband waiting six hours for admission to hospital when he was having a suspected heart attack © Provided by Daily Mail Glenys Chambers expressed her fury at the situation that saw her husband waiting six hours for admission to hospital when he was having a suspected heart attack

LATEST 24-HOUR COVID-19 DATA

NSW: 15,352 cases, 20 deaths, 2236 in hospital with 63 in ICU

Victoria: 12,984 cases, 28 deaths, 906 in hospital with 45 in ICU

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Tasmania:1586 cases, three deaths (one occurred in April and has only just been confirmed) with 49 in hospital and two in ICU

Queensland: 9650 cases, 15 deaths, 1034 in hospital and 21 in ICU

SA: 4774 cases, 22 deaths (from May 3 to July 18), 323 in hospital with 11 in ICU

WA: 7901 cases, two deaths, 457 in hospital with 22 in ICU

NT: 642 cases, 68 in hospital with one in ICU

ACT: 961 cases, no deaths, 160 in hospital with four in ICU

Victoria had 906 Covid cases in hospital on Wednesday with 36 needing intensive care as state registered nearly 14,000 positive tests.

Melbourne hospitals have already moved to cancel category two and three elective surgery to focus on critical emergency operations as Covid and other winter ailments take hold.

Patrick Lo of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons said staff shortages because of illness and the severe flu season were hitting hard.

'There's just no resources left to carry out these procedures,' he told Virginia Trioli on ABC Radio Melbourne.

'The hospitals are completely bursting at the seams.'

Victoria's state government has been under fire over a series of code red warnings for ambulances.

This means critical staff or vehicle shortages left no ambulances available to be deployed to assist the sick and injured.

Victorian Premier Dan Andrews on Monday launched what he called the third stage of his government's winter response plan.

This will include the broadening of a virtual emergency department program, which allows people suffering non-urgent conditions to consult health professionals by teleconference.

The government also promised to provide ambulance offload teams at 14 public hospitals to tackle ramping issues and make more private beds available for public patients.

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