Style: When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation? - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Style When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation?

08:20  15 october  2019
08:20  15 october  2019 Source:   huffingtonpost.com

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Anyone can appropriate Black culture, including non - Black minorities , according to Keisha Brown, an associate professor of history at Tennessee “While our voices are essential to the conversation, it is not our responsibility alone to educate others about their injustice and appropriation .”

"And it was immediately a reflection on black people: Now why weren't black people making it , but Asians were?" His New York Times story, headlined, "Success Story, Japanese-American Style ," is regarded as one of the most influential pieces written about Asian-Americans.

Lilly Singh wearing a purple shirt: Lilly Singh seen at Twentieth Century Fox © Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: AP Lilly Singh seen at Twentieth Century Fox

We’ve seen a wealth of celebrities including Miley Cyrus and the Kardashians appropriating Black culture, plus countless fashion designers sending white models down their runways wearing locs, braids and baby hairs. But what happens when we start to talk about Black appropriation among other minority communities?

Lilly Singh, host of “A Little Late with Lilly Singh,” has been called out throughout her career for “modern-day blackface,” wearing baggy clothing, cornrows and dashiki on her YouTube channel. The Canadian-born comedian, who embraces her Indian heritage, has dismissed the criticism on Twitter.

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And by conflating what Black people do with appropriation , we easily slide into the common ways we make It is important to understand that Black peoples’ interactions with other cultures are not based on a We’re still fighting to have them not associated with criminality and this is a fight no other non

Dear non - Black Asian-Americans (and other non - Black folks), we have a real issue with appropriating AAVE, and it needs to stop. It is a truism acknowledged by many cultural historians that the sources of innovation by which a culture renews itself are often generated by its most

Then there’s actor Shay Mitchellwho’s of Filipino and Scottish-Irish descent. She received backlash on Instagram after wearing cornrows multiple times.

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America loves appropriating black culture -- even when black people themselves, at times, don't receive much love from America. The meaning of cultural appropriation has gained more attention this year, with people like Amandla Stenberg schooling the country on how harmful it can be.

When is a dress just a dress? Remember those photos of the little cocktail number that looked blue with black lace to some and white with gold lace to The whole cultural appropriation debate is in danger of being turned from a defence of minorities under the colonialist cosh into a lazy substitute

A post shared by Shay Mitchell (@shaymitchell) on Jul 21, 2019 at 5:55pm PDT

Most recently, YouTuber Nikita Dragun, who is Vietnamese and Mexican, made headlines for wearing gray box braids to show her “love and appreciation for all the gorgeous black women in my life and also to those that follow me,” she wrote on Instagram.

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When adoptive parents choose to internationally adopt , they are able to “choose” the race of their child. They can choose to adopt any child from The National Association of Black Social Workers, which consisted of twelve members, opposed interracial adoption , saying it was "cultural suicide"

When we wish to speak more plainly, we talk of ‘‘ appropriation ’’ — a word now associated with the white Western world’s co-opting of minority cultures. But many of the most dogged critics of cultural appropriation are turning out to be the very people who were supposed to be indifferent to it .

A post shared by Mother of Draguns (@nikita_dragun) on Sep 7, 2019 at 6:00pm PDT

So is this appropriation? Absolutely.

Anyone can appropriate Black culture, including non-Black minorities, according to Keisha Brown, an associate professor of history at Tennessee State University.

  When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation? © Getty “So many facets of Black culture, both historically and contemporaneously, have become synonymous with mainstream American culture,” Brown told HuffPost. “A related issue at hand is the separation of Black culture from the peoples and history that created it. People embrace the hip or popular elements of Black culture, but not Black Americans.”

Instead, “non-Black minorities should be natural allies,” said Lindsey Day, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of CRWN Magazine.

“The thing that’s interesting about an Indian or Japanese or Mexican person wearing American Blackness is that they’ve had the privilege of continuity in their own cultural traditions,” Day said. “They are playing dress-up in something that we’ve fought to regenerate after having centuries of cultural disruption and suppression.”

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The big issue with this popularized meme is that it appropriates black language, culture, and Cultural appropriation , defined as “the act of taking or using things from a culture that is not your Memes have the power to point out racist double standards towards celebrities adopting black

Minorities are constantly subjected to cultural appropriation primarily with clothing and the actions associated with the clothing. When wearing clothing of various ethnicities, it is seen more as cultural appreciation and awareness rather than appropriation .

And yet, time and time again, we’ve seen this narrative play out, such as when mainstream publications dubbed acrylic nails “manicure sculptures,” erasing the history of Black trendsetters like Olympic champion Flo-Jo, who wore acrylic nails for decades before they were deemed acceptable by white editorial standards. Or when a white woman was praised for “inventing” the silk head wrap, which Black women have worn to protect their hair for decades.

“We know that along the way to being accepted, things get lost in translation — or lost completely,” Teela Davis, a licensed marriage and family therapist who specializes in racial identity, told HuffPost in an email. “So, on the one hand, cultural appropriation might be an indication of being embraced by the culture at large. But it’s usually at the expense of losing control of the narrative.”

  When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation? © Getty Every time the cultural appropriation debate sparks on online platforms like Instagram and Twitter, many Black commenters simply say, “Credit is all we want.” So in a case like Dragun’s, in which she intentionally wrote a lengthy caption detailing the origin of box braids, is this appreciation or appropriation?

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When Keziah Daum wore a Chinese- style dress to her high school prom in Utah, it set off an uproar — but not because of its tight fit or thigh-high slit. — After reading multiple perspectives, do you think Ms. Daum’s prom dress was an example of cultural appropriation ? Or is it just another instance of

After a black San Francisco State University student confronted a white student over his dreadlock hairstyle, calling it cultural appropriation , people are talking about the topic of white people with dreads.

“While acknowledging the origin of the style or influence is a good start, that is just the first step in moving from appropriation to appreciation,” Brown said. “Beyond mere acknowledgment of the influence or inspiration [and one’s privilege and platform], an individual should also strive to understand the origin, impact and function of said cultural practices.” 

Black hair has long been politicized and policed in the workplace and beyond. In July, we saw the first piece of legislation banning discrimination against Black students and employees over their natural hairstyles. Legislation such as the CROWN Act is “imperative to add to the appropriation conversation because it continues to send a clear message that Black culture perpetuated by Blacks themselves is still not accepted in deemed places of ‘professionalism,’” Tiffany Packer, an assistant professor at Florida A&M University, told HuffPost in an email. “These types of legislations continue to foster the dilemma of ‘Double Consciousness’ that W.E.B. Dubois discussed in the early 20th century — the internal struggle of blacks to function as an accepted member of society while attempting to remain true to his or her Blackness.”

It's all too common for designers to walk white models down the runway in cornrows. This model walked the runway during Gonçalo Peixoto's show at Lisbon Fashion Week on March 10. © Carlos Rodrigues via Getty Images It's all too common for designers to walk white models down the runway in cornrows. This model walked the runway during Gonçalo Peixoto's show at Lisbon Fashion Week on March 10. When it becomes necessary to pass anti-discriminatory laws in supposedly inclusive and accepting places like California and New York, “then what does that suggest about being Black and being able to proudly wear your mane in other parts of the country?” Packer added.

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The implication here is that non -Asian people are able to appropriate and perpetuate Orientalism Cultural appropriation is an exercise of this unjust dynamic, and it is a method in which minorities The BET Awards are a powerful rebuke to those who try to dehumanize black culture and bodies.

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Ultimately, it’s not just about one specific incident or “canceling” the insensitive influencer behind it.

“Cultural appropriation is an issue because of the history of systematic destruction and exploitation of Black culture,” Day said. “America turned free people into ‘niggers,’ and to everyone’s surprise, we created new forms of beautiful expression out of that pain. Those cultural expressions have become America’s greatest cultural exports and engines to build white wealth.”

“Hip-hop and jazz, for example, are indisputably creations of Blackness. But the Black people behind the art forms have gotten the table scraps of the wealth they’ve created,” Day continued. “So when we talk about cultural appropriation, it’s not about policing who wears what hairstyle. We’re pointing to a complex history of the exploitation of Blackness. These are sore spots over old wounds — and a good neighbor would know to leave some things alone.”

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Images of black people, particularly black men, wearing durags have been part of black cultural consciousness for years. In spite of the obvious practical uses for durags, black men were, and still are, of course often labeled as thuggish and low-class when they wear them.

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With the data, legislation and the history of Black hair, many people who opt into this conversation chalk up Black hair to “just a hairstyle.” But by doing so, they are dismissing the experience of women and girls who add their personal experiences to the conversation surrounding hairstyles that date back to 3500 B.C. in African culture.

Nicole C. Jackson, a psychotherapist who specializes in cultural and systemic oppression among emerging adults, works with many young African-American women who struggle with embracing their beauty and identity “due to the onslaught of Eurocentric standards of beauty often entrenched in the world of social media and other digital platforms.”

  When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation? © Getty “It’s possible to be psychologically affected by the consistent denying, rejection and attempts to discredit our beauty and all that we are,” said Jackson, who is also a licensed clinical and social worker. Potential effects can include depression, anxiety, feelings of inferiority, isolation, low self-esteem and internalized oppression.

Jackson’s advice to white people and non-Black minorities is this: “Other ethnicities should begin with a personal awareness of the impact of culture and a willingness to put their personal beliefs aside to gain a deeper understanding.” For Black women, she said, “give yourself permission to take a timeout from the debate.” 

  When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation? © Getty “We often find ourselves in the role of educating everyone, from our children’s teachers, doctors and co-workers about what it means to be us,” Jackson said. “While our voices are essential to the conversation, it is not our responsibility alone to educate others about their injustice and appropriation.”

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Hair Steaming Is The Easy (And Free) Cure For Your Dry Winter Hair .
Hair Steaming Is The Easy (And Free) Cure For Your Dry Winter Hair Most of the time when there's a beauty trick to sort out your hair, it requires going to the salon or spending a lot of money. But once in a while a brilliant idea comes along which includes neither of those things, and hair steaming is just that.It's not exactly a new concept (women with tightly coiled hair have been applying oil and then heat for decades) but shockingly a lot of women don't realise just how much of a difference steaming their hair can make.

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