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Cars 'Banning petrol and diesel is not enough, the Government must drive the switch to electric cars'

11:45  04 february  2020
11:45  04 february  2020 Source:   carbuyer.co.uk

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a close up of a car: MINI John Cooper Works GP - exhaust © Carbuyer MINI John Cooper Works GP - exhaust

You will be waking up to the news today that the sale of petrol and diesel cars will be banned by 2035, and not 2040 as originally announced in 2017. It’s news that will not only send a shockwave through the car industry but could well be leaving car buyers feeling a little confused.

Confused because not only has the target been brought forwards by five years, but now it’s not just conventional petrols and diesels either.

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The Government plans are expected to include the banning of hybrids (like the Toyota Prius) and plug-in hybrid petrols and diesels (cars the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV and Mercedes E 300 de) – cars which, up until today, we’ve all been encouraged to consider when buying our next car.

Government ‘to consult’ on pulling forward 2040 petrol and diesel car ban

  Government ‘to consult’ on pulling forward 2040 petrol and diesel car ban Consultation to bring forward the ambitious 2040 target banning new petrol and diesel car sales may soon begin, suggests a government Minister The post Government ‘to consult’ on pulling forward 2040 petrol and diesel car ban appeared first on Motoring Research.

The government ’s move to bring forward a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars to 2035 has been attacked by manufacturers as a “date without a plan”. The government must support city-regions and local authorities in the expansion of electric vehicle charging networks, provide financial

Diesel and petrol ban explained: What are electric cars like to drive , how will the government replace Electric answers: Here's what you need to know about the governments new plans to ban petrol Will there be cash incentives to switch to electric cars before 2040? The Air Quality Plan

To put this simply, from 2035 you will only be able to buy a pure electric or hydrogen car – cars that run simply on those power sources and not on petrol or diesel in any way.

So what? You might be thinking. That’s 15 years away and, if you take the average new car buyer’s habit for keeping a car for three years (paying for it on PCP finance), that’s three new car buying cycles before anyone is forced to make the switch to a car that, for some people, is powered in a completely different way to what they’re used to.

That’s true, but will there be enough electric cars on sale across the board for all budgets? Will there be a good enough supply of electric cars that cost around £15,000, for instance? That’s before we even consider hydrogen and whether there will be enough of those types of cars available - or the infrastructure to support them.

Shock as hybrids included in new 2035 petrol and diesel car ban for first time

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Electric car drivers might have green number plates in the future which grants them special access These cars cannot be plugged into electric charging points, but gets its' energy from petrol or They also reduce air pollution which means that if more people drove EVs then the air around us would be

Electric cars offer the biggest savings over diesel in Norway (27%) as the Wappelhorst said financial incentives for electric cars would not be needed when purchase prices fall to that of fossil-fuel powered cars Tate said the UK government could do more to drive the growth of electric cars .

The reason for the concern is real, though. For car makers, meeting that 2040 target was already ambitious, but by bringing the ban forwards by five years there will be some genuine concerns. Most cars are developed with around a seven-year lifespan, so a car launched in 2020 would have gone through a six-year development programme with the manufacturer before arriving in showrooms, and it would be expected to be replaced by around 2026. To meet that target of selling no petrol or diesel cars by 2035, car manufacturers need to advance their electric car – and hydrogen car – programmes now, without delay.

That’s rather hard for manufacturers who are struggling to invest in electric car technology, let alone hydrogen cars. 2020 is the year of the electrified car, and over the next 12 months you will see a raft of not only new electric cars, but also new petrol and diesel cars powered by full hybrid, mild hybrid and plug-in hybrid technology. Car makers are now learning that the hybrids they’ve spent millions on developing could well be shunned by buyers who are worried about the 2035 ban.

What does the government’s ban on petrol and diesel cars mean?

  What does the government’s ban on petrol and diesel cars mean? The government has announced plans to bring forward its ban on sales of petrol and diesel vehicles – but what does that mean? The government has announced plans to bring forward its ban on selling new petrol and diesel vehicles to 2035. Its original plan was to do this by 2040, and continue to allow hybrid models to be sold. However, the new plan is much stricter, banning all but fully electric models from being sold on the new market.

But it warned that big changes must be made to electric vehicle pricing and practicality to make them a viable option for the nation's driver and failing to give the sector enough time to adjust to the switch over could undermine the sector. 'The UK government 's ambition for all new cars and vans to be

A ban on sales of new petrol and diesel vehicles will be brought forward to 2035, under plans outlined as the Prime Minister launches key UN climate As part of the UK's moves to meet its legal goal to reach net zero by 2050, the Government will consult on bringing forward a planned ban on the sale

The looming 2035 ban could have other effects on consumer behaviour, too. It’s only new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars that are in line to be banned so models already on the road will be able to carry on as normal. It’s a fact that the technology in new petrol and diesel models is growing more sophisticated all the time, with the latest products emitting far lower levels of harmful emissions that those sold only a few years ago. The hard 2035 cut-off for fossil fuels in cars risks incentivising motorists to drive older, more polluting internal combustion engined cars for longer and potentially delay the purchase of a new, cleaner car until the uncertainty around what kind of car they should by next is lifted.

Of course, a smooth transition up to and past the ban is doable, and if car makers want to sell cars (which, funnily enough, they do) they will meet the targets. They have to. But it’s not all down to the car makers as governments need to get behind electric car subsidies, infrastructure and information like they never have before. Words are one thing but actions are quite another.

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For whom the purchase of a diesel is still worthwhile .
The diesel is in the pillory. Last but not least, the auto companies themselves are responsible: in theory, they made their cars appear cleaner than they actually were in everyday life. © Photo: Christin Klose / dpa-tmn When is the economy trip worthwhile? Diesel engines use less fuel than comparable petrol engines. But now the industry has reacted. Diesel cars complying with the Euro 6d standard emit fewer pollutants than any diesel before.

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