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Cars Government moves forward with law to make petrol and diesel cars illegal by 2035

14:05  21 february  2020
14:05  21 february  2020 Source:   inews.co.uk

As Birmingham plans to stop vehicles driving through the city, we reveal the areas set to ban cars or have a low emission zone within three years

  As Birmingham plans to stop vehicles driving through the city, we reveal the areas set to ban cars or have a low emission zone within three years Some 20 UK towns and cities either have plans in place for low emission zones or vehicle bans, or have already implemented restrictions on vehicle use in their area. Here's what they have proposed.Birmingham City Council is the latest to publish its draft transport plan, which is highlighted by a proposal to ban car users from making 'through trips' to get from one side of city to the other and a 20mph limit on all residential roads.

The Government is pressing ahead with its plan to ban all new non-electric cars from sale by 2035 at the latest. The policy was first announced by Prime Minister Boris Johnson earlier this month, bringing forward the original cut-off date by five years. Ministers published a consultation document yesterday

The government ’s move to bring forward a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars to 2035 has been attacked by manufacturers as a “date without a The government needs to make clear how much carbon it believes this 2035 ban will save. It should also guarantee any target it sets in law .”

a car parked on the side of a building © Provided by The i

The Government is pressing ahead with its plan to ban all new non-electric cars from sale by 2035 at the latest.

The policy was first announced by Prime Minister Boris Johnson earlier this month, bringing forward the original cut-off date by five years.

Ministers published a consultation document yesterday revealing they are now seeking views on whether 2035 is the right date, what the barriers to the phase-out could be and how a 2035 ban would have on the auto industry.

The auto industry has already accused the government of “moving the goalposts” by bringing forward the ban. In particular, it has railed against the government's decision to include hybrid vehicles in the ban, which automakers say removes a crucial stepping stone for consumers to transition to fully electric cars. But environmental campaigners who have long argued for a faster transition to electric vehicles have welcomed the speedier timeline.

What does the government’s ban on petrol and diesel cars mean?

  What does the government’s ban on petrol and diesel cars mean? The government has announced plans to bring forward its ban on selling new petrol and diesel vehicles to 2035. Its original plan was to do this by 2040, and continue to allow hybrid models to be sold. However, the new plan is much stricter, banning all but fully electric models from being sold on the new market. Your browser does not support this video require(["binding"], function (binding) { binding("wcVideoPlayer", "#video_player_573965d4-7bdd-44ed-85aa-bc377cc60c18").

The petrol and diesel has been moved forward to 2035 . READ MORE: Driving law 2020: What are the main changes this year? “The government is right to accelerate the phase-out of petrol and diesel cars to curb air pollution and address the climate emergency, but the ban should start in 2030

As part of the UK’s moves to meet its legal goal to reach net zero by 2050, the Government will consult on bringing forward a planned ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles from 2040 to 2035 – and earlier if feasible. The ban, which Government advisers the Committee on Climate

  Government moves forward with law to make petrol and diesel cars illegal by 2035 © Provided by The i

"Range anxiety" is when drivers worry they will run out of power before finding a plug point (Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Ministers have even suggested the ban could come sooner than 2035. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has mooted 2032 as a potential phase out date for non-electric vehicles.

Meanwhile the government’s independent climate advisers say sales of new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars should end by 2030 if the UK is to hit net zero emissions by 2050 at least cost.

Read more:

A buyers’ guide to hybrids and electric cars

Rising sales

Battery electric cars only account for about three per cent of new car sales, but are growing rapidly. In January 2020 sales grew by more than 200 per cent compared to the same period a year earlier.

2035 petrol and diesel ban brings ‘challenges and opportunities’

  2035 petrol and diesel ban brings ‘challenges and opportunities’ The Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership has spoken out about the petrol and diesel car sales ban, welcoming the move to bring it forward from 2040 to 2035. The post 2035 petrol and diesel ban brings ‘challenges and opportunities’ appeared first on Motoring Research.

Originally, legislation stipulated that the sale of petrol and diesel would be banned by 2040. Now that date has been pulled forward to 2035 , with Prime Minister Boris Johnson saying the ban would come into effect even earlier The UK is bringing forward its ban on the sale of fossil fuel cars by five years.

Total ban on new petrol and diesel cars could be brought forward FIVE YEARS to 2035 under plans being explored by Transport Secretary Grant Shapps. While such moves would be controversial - not least for the motor industry - it would bring Britain closer in-line with other European nations such as

But many consumers are still wary of buying an electric vehicle. Part of the reluctance is driven by cost, with electric cars still considerably more expensive than petrol and diesel alternatives, although prices are falling.

There is also concern that the recharging infrastructure across the country is inadequate, with "range anxiety" - drivers' fear they won't have enough power to get them to the next charging station - cited as a major barrier to purchase.

Most major manufacturers are attempting to counteract these fears by bringing out cars with longer ranges. US electric vehicle giant Tesla currently boasts cars with the longest range on the market, but rivals are moving in. The new Vauxhall Corsa-e, for example, will hit the UK later this month with a £22,000 price tag and 211-mile range. Meanwhile the Volkswagen ID3, set for launch in the summer, will have a starting price of £27,000 with a range of 205 and 341 miles between charges - more than most people drive in a week.

James Ruppert: Practical diesel cars that won't fall foul of the ULEZ .
Vauxhall Astras, Insignias and - if you're hankering for a bit more style - the Mazda 6 all fit the briefFirst off, there are some colossal-mileage estates around for a few thousand pounds, and it just depends on whether you want something that has been properly maintained or with low mileage. Otherwise it could be poised to deliver an awful lot of diesel particulate filter and simple old-age issues. I think Ian needs an estate with a bit of life left in it, so I’ll stick with motors below 70,000 miles.

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