•   
  •   

Cars The history of the Porsche 911 Targa

14:52  20 may  2020
14:52  20 may  2020 Source:   msn.com

Porsche Taycan Turbo 2020 UK review

  Porsche Taycan Turbo 2020 UK review Will the UK’s narrower, bumpier roads put this 671bhp electric Porsche in its place?Of course, being battery powered, the pick-up is instantaneous and relentless in any situation, but unlike some EVs, there doesn’t seem to be any let-up at higher speeds. Be in no doubt that only a smattering of road-legal cars (and certainly very few with four usable seats) could keep up with the Taycan Turbo in the real world. Launch control (Sport Plus, left foot hard on brake, right foot on throttle) brings full power and ensuing seat-pinning hilarity.

Porsche introduced the 911 Targa at the International Motor Show in Frankfurt in September 1965. The Targa is neither a cabriolet nor a coupé, neither a From today on, the second episode looks back into the history of Porsche , and the elements of which that have inspired the world premiere of the

The Porsche 911 (pronounced Nine Eleven or in German: Neunelfer) is a two-door, 2+2 high performance rear-engined sports car.

a red car parked in a parking lot: The firm’s famous drop-top has been around for some time, but how has it changed? © Porsche The firm’s famous drop-top has been around for some time, but how has it changed?

Porsche has unveiled its latest incarnation of the 911 Targa this week. An ever-present feature in the line-up of 911 variations, the Targa is a classically styled sports car which puts an emphasis on experience rather than being an out-and-out track monster.

But where did it come from and how has it changed over the years? Let’s take a look.

The original Targa

a blue car parked in front of a building © Provided by PA Motoring

The original Targa was introduced back in 1967, following on from the inception of the regular 911 in 1963. It was named to celebrate Porsche’s victories in the Targa Florio races, and debuted an innovative hoop-based roof design.

Porsche 911 Turbo S 2020 review

  Porsche 911 Turbo S 2020 review Range-topping version of iconic sports car gets a host of key technical upgrades, including a new engine that makes it the quickest 911 yetThe new Turbo S is typically well mannered in Comfort mode around town. It’s not exactly quiet, but neither is it ever particularly raucous. There’s greater intent to the gravel-toned exhaust note than before, thanks to the availability of an optional sports exhaust – as fitted to our test car – for the first time. However, it’s still relatively subdued.

Porsche 911 Targa | A History - Продолжительность: 5:24 Total 911 Magazine 22 307 просмотров. Incredible Kevin Estre lap of the Nürburgring in the new Porsche 911 GT3 RS - Продолжительность: 10:06 Andrew Hurst 4 695 402 просмотра.

The Automotive Dedicated Channel #SuperCarChannelBG # Porsche 911 .

In fact, it was a reaction from Porsche to an argument happening in America, where full convertible cars were considered too dangerous, with rumours that regulations could require a motorsport-inspired rollover hoop in the future. It’s why Porsche took inspiration from its race cars and fitted the roll hoop design on the Targa.

Originally fitted with a flip-down rear screen, this was later changed to a fixed glass version after customers complained about the original soft screen.

It would continue to be offered through the 1970s and 1980s as the 911 evolved, gaining a satin black finish and mild design tweaks.

993-generation 911 Targa

a man driving a car © Provided by PA Motoring

The 993-generation 911 was built between 1994 and 1998, and saw the biggest evolution of the Targa concept since its inception.

Ford GT vs Radical RXC Turbo vs Porsche 911 GT3 RS: supercar battle

  Ford GT vs Radical RXC Turbo vs Porsche 911 GT3 RS: supercar battle Is life on the road tolerable in a converted competition thoroughbred or a track-ready sports car? We find outEarly-bird visitors to Brooklands Museum are getting a look at an impromptu exhibit: a trio of modern motorsport-derived production cars whose designs and origins make them at once fundamentally alike but also fascinatingly different from each other.

Like the 911 Carrera models, both 911 Targa variants profit from the increase in power provided by the turbocharged three-litre six-cylinder boxer engines. The exterior of the 911 Targa is characterised by the design elements of its 992 model generation. Compared to its predecessors, its body features

In 1966, Porsche presented the 160 hp 911 S, which was the first to feature forged alloy wheels from Fuchs. The 911 Targa , with its distinctive stainless steel Internally known as the 991, this sports car embodied the greatest engineering leap in the history of the 911 . For generations the benchmark in

Instead of the prominent rollover hoop, the roof looked similar to the coupe. However, a glass roof above the driver would retract to give that Targa top feel, sliding back beneath the rear glass pane. It was a major departure from the manually removable Targa tops that had come before.

Addressing the early fears about convertible car safety that spawned the Targa, the thick B pillar would act as the rollover hoop. Other advantages were that it removed the need to find somewhere to store the roof, and this design would continue through the 996 and 997 generations.

Back to its roots

a yellow and black car © Provided by PA Motoring

As with most design, if you leave enough time then nostalgia will make it cool again – and that appears to be the case with the Targa too.

In 2014 for the then-new 991-generation 911, Porsche revived the brushed aluminium rollover hoop on the Targa model with its fixed rear screen. However, unlike the original model, the roof could retract automatically, introducing the much-loved and incredibly complex closing mechanism we know and love today.

This week, Porsche revealed the 2020 911 Targa, complete with rollover hoop and complex closing mechanism that can be completed in just 19 seconds. Available in both 4 and 4S trims, the 3.0-litre engine makes 380bhp and 444bhp respectively – thoroughly modern performance in a classically styled sports car.

Porsche 911 Targa 2020 UK review .
Aside from its looks, the 911 Targa has always struggled to stand out against its rangemates. Now, there’s a new one. We put it to the test in the UK for the first timeIn these environments, the Targa rides with plenty of purpose, but isn’t so firm that that you’d think twice about using it as more of a long-legged GT - something plenty of Targa owners will no doubt have done over the years. Coupled with the 911’s fantastic driving position and excellent visibility front and rear, it is a sports car in which you could quite happily endure big-mile schleps.

usr: 0
This is interesting!