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Cars Porsche 911 Targa 4S first drive in the UK

02:23  11 august  2020
02:23  11 august  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Back to the roots: These places have been recaptured by nature.

 Back to the roots: These places have been recaptured by nature. At the end of the 1960s, VW had a problem: the Beetle did not run as well, and no successor was in sight. A Porsche development was supposed to remedy this: the EA 266. © Porsche AG In the end, the tanks came: Two Leopard tanks ended the short life of the prototypes of the EA 266 in 1971. What came under the chains would have the successor of the VW Beetle type 1 should be. It had made Volkswagen big and successful, but also paralyzed in the end.

All-wheel drive Porsche Traction Management (PTM) optimally distributes drive force between the permanently driven rear axle and the front axle. The 1963 Porsche Crest is proudly presented on the bonnet, the Sports steering wheel, the key and the wheel centres of the 911 Targa 4 S Heritage

But with the 911 , Porsche feared the NHTSA would ban the sales of convertibles. Thus they created a drop top with a permanent steel roll bar: the targa . " Targa " - shield in Italian - came from the Targa Florio sports car road race in Sicily, in which Porsche had scored seven victories. From 1967 to 1982

Should you be in any doubt about the eye-catching appeal of Porsche’s powerful new Targa 4S, how about this.

With the electrically-operated Targa roof open in the glorious sunshine, I was sitting quietly at the wheel of the £130,000 sports car in front of the German firm's UK headquarters on the outskirts of Reading, adjusting the seat and driving settings, before heading off for a first fun-filled test-drive on UK roads.

Then, out of the corner of my eye I saw a sporty estate car whizz past in the distance before pulling up sharply. The vaguely familiar, casually-dressed driver looked over, waved, got out, and trotted across the tarmac to where I was parked up.

The history of the Porsche 911 Targa

  The history of the Porsche 911 Targa Porsche has unveiled its latest incarnation of the 911 Targa this week. An ever-present feature in the line-up of 911 variations, the Targa is a classically styled sports car which puts an emphasis on experience rather than being an out-and-out track monster. But where did it come from and how has it changed over the years? Let’s take a look. The original Targa © Provided by PA Motoring The original Targa was introduced back in 1967, following on from the inception of the regular 911 in 1963. It was named to celebrate Porsche’s victories in the Targa Florio races, and debuted an innovative hoop-based roof design.

All-wheel drive Porsche Traction Management (PTM) optimally distributes drive force between the permanently driven rear axle and the front axle. The 1963 Porsche Crest is proudly presented on the bonnet, the Sports steering wheel, the key and the wheel centres of the 911 Targa 4 S Heritage

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4 S Heritage Design Edition - Drive , Interior and Exterior. Color: Cherry Metallic. Please Consider Subscribing. 0:00 Interior and

Was it a car photographer I’d worked with?

As he drew closer in his blue t-shirt and jeans the penny finally dropped: it was singer-songwriter and car aficionado Jay Kay from Jamiroquai who’d spotted the new Porsche - on German plates and ahead of first UK deliveries this August –  and admitted he just couldn’t resist coming over for a closer look.

a car parked on pavement near a forest: Open-top review: Ray Massey has been testing the all-new Porsche 911 Targa 4S before it hits UK show rooms in the coming weeks © Provided by This Is Money Open-top review: Ray Massey has been testing the all-new Porsche 911 Targa 4S before it hits UK show rooms in the coming weeks

In another era, before the coronavirus pandemic, I’d have invited him in for a drive.

With his vast experience of performance cars, I might even have got him to write this review for me.

Sadly, with strict social distancing measures in place and the fact that Porsche had gone to great lengths to ‘sanitise’ my car down to its switches and sealed plipper key, it wasn’t to be.

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All-wheel drive Porsche Traction Management (PTM) optimally distributes drive force between the permanently driven rear axle and the front axle. And honouring iconic Porsche classics with numerous design highlights. Starting with the 50s and early 60s – the 911 Targa 4 S Heritage Design

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But we had a good – two-meter socially distanced – chat.

He’d been dropping off one of his own cars for a service and, even though he admitted he was slimming down his own vast car collection to remove some of the ‘shrapnel’, he was so taken with the Targa he took a few pictures on his phone, with me behind the wheel. Talk about role reversal.

So what a fantastic scene-setter for my own test drive around the highways and byways of Berkshire including skirting the beautiful Ridgeway and its tremendous views.

Racer’s £8m car collection being sold with no reserve

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911 Targa 4 S Heritage Design Edition. from AED 720,500 incl. VAT. The shape and position of the main headlights are also reminiscent of the first 911 generations. Porsche Connect helps you do this. It puts you in the ideal starting position for every drive in your 911 .

Every 911 has the same fundamental aim: driving . As sportily as possible. That’s why the twin-turbo horizontally opposed engine, the The 1963 Porsche Crest is proudly presented on the bonnet, the Sports steering wheel, the key and the wheel centres of the 911 Targa 4 S Heritage Design Edition.

Porsche’s long-term attitude with the 911 is ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t’ fix it’ – just keep refining it to within an inch or centimetre of its life.

And this is this case with the new 911 Targa 4s, the eighth generation of the Targa niche since its inception 1965. It joins its 911 Coupé and Cabriolet siblings to form a tantalising Porsche trio.

Immediate impression for a first drive on Britain’s potholed roads is that the suspension felt quite hard at low speed but that’s easily tweaked by adjusting the damper settings to suit – or simply putting your foot down a bit. Sorted. It springs into life.

Once in the swing, around the twisting county lanes of Berkshire it proved a delight, gripping the road like a limpet and proving exceptionally engaging.

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With the Targa top open it’s great to get the delightful wind-in the hair sensation.

True, it’s a half-way house between a full-metal coupe and a fully top-down cabriolet. But you get the best – not the worst - of both worlds.

In the glorious sunshine I drove mainly top-down, though with the top up it is wonderfully cocooning with a surprising amount of headroom.

Playing around with the settings, I toggled between normal, ‘Sport’ and, when feeling particularly adventurous, ‘Sport-plus’ and felt the sinews tighten considerably.

In the latter two modes the exhaust sound increase to a throaty rumble, and the blips and blisters when gears drop down are deeply satisfying.

It burbled quietly through small villages and towns, but was let off the leash on long-legged country roads with beautiful vistas. On a long straight stretch the acceleration is exhilarating – until you just run out of road.

All that oomph from the Targa 4S comes courtesy of a powerfully lean rear-mounted 3.0-litre flat-six engine uprated to 450 horsepower  - an increase of 30PS on its predecessor.

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  Porsche 911 Targa 2020 UK review Aside from its looks, the 911 Targa has always struggled to stand out against its rangemates. Now, there’s a new one. We put it to the test in the UK for the first timeIn these environments, the Targa rides with plenty of purpose, but isn’t so firm that that you’d think twice about using it as more of a long-legged GT - something plenty of Targa owners will no doubt have done over the years. Coupled with the 911’s fantastic driving position and excellent visibility front and rear, it is a sports car in which you could quite happily endure big-mile schleps.

That allows the car to accelerate from rest to 62mph in just 3.6 seconds with the Sport Chrono package (as fitted to my car) or in 3.8 seconds without.

Will it fit in my garage? Porsche 911 Targa 4S

On sale: now

First deliveries: from this month, August 2020

Price: from £109,725

Price of my car as driven: £129, 172(Targa range from £98,170)

Seats: 2 plus 2

Doors: 2

Time to open/close Targa top: 19 seconds

Length: 4,519mm

Width (with mirrors): 2,024mm

Width (mirrors folded): 1,852mm

Height: 1,299mm

Wheelbase: 2,450mm

Weight:

Unladen: 1675kg

Max weight: 2,085kg

Engine: 3.0-litre flat-six

Power: 450 horsepower (PS) – up 30PS on predecessor

Gears: 8-speed dual clutch automatic with manual override

Acceleration:

0-62mph (standard): 3.8 seconds

0-62mph (with Sport Chrono package): 3.6 seconds

Top speed: 189mph

Fuel economy: 26.2mpg

CO2 emissions: 245g/km

That’s our tenths faster than the car it replaces - up to a top speed of 189mph, which you’ll only get near – and keep your licence - on a test track or de-restricted German Autobahn.

The willing engine is linked to a slick eight-speed dual-clutch transmission- a ‘Doppelkupplung’ for those interested in the original German – which is very perceptive with its changes, though you can switch to paddles on the wheel for greater hands-on engagement.

An intelligent all-wheel drive traction management is standard and helps boost grip, and keep drivers out of trouble.

The 911 Targa 4S can also be ordered with the new seven-speed manual gearbox - with which the Sport Chrono package is combined – as a no-cost option.

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All that hard driving is thirsty work – for the car – so the official average fuel economy 26.2mpg may not reflect more spirited driving styles. CO2 emissions are 245g/km. Both are based on the new ‘real world’ WLTP measure.

Styling-wise, it is evolutionary and certainly not revolutionary.

The nose features more pronounced front wheel arches with rounded LED headlights while the bonnet has a recess to evoke the design of the earliest 911 generations. Apart from the front and rear sections, the entire outer skin is aluminium.

But it’s a comfortably sporty and supportive cockpit in which to sit while munching up the miles.

The interior echoes the 911 Carrera models with a clear, straight-lined dashboard and recessed instruments, said by Porsche to be inspired by models from the 1970s.

Thankfully it was not inspired by other less successful design icons of that era – such as flared trousers, tank-tops, kipper-ties and wedge-heeled shoes.

In line with that evolutionary philosophy, the new 911 Targa borrows styling cues that hark back to the original 1965 Targa with its removable roof section above the front seats when it was billed as a ‘safety cabriolet’.

At its heart is the innovative roof system that helps combine a sleek coupe-like appearance and wraparound rear window with the delightful wind-in the hair indulgence of open-topped motoring.

But whereas the original Targa top required some manual dexterity to remove and store the central roof section, the new car does it all automatically and electrically at the touch of a button and in just 19 seconds.

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  Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet 2020 UK review Folding-roof 911 is as monstrously fast as the coupe, only with added dramaThe question mark comes when you start talking about the car’s sheer performance potential. Convertibles are mainly cruisers. Fabric tops are sometimes speed limited because they can’t always stand the stresses of extreme speed. They’re usually quite a lot noisier than tin-tops, too.

It’s a delight to watch the ballet-like choreography as the fully-automatic system stows the roof top behind the rear seats.

But you have to leave a bit of extra space behind the car to avoid dinging other vehicles, fences or walls in the process.

The thick protective Targa sides create a bit of a visual blind spot when looking out to the side at trick junctions, though the blind-spot warning does help compensate for that.

My 4S model was fitted as standard with 20-inch front wheels and 21-inch rears, while its 350mm brake discs had red-painted brake calipers (six pistons at the front and four at the rear). Ceramic brakes are an option.

It also came with a wide variety of electric stability controls with more acronym initials than you can wave a stick at –even when translated from the German to the English.

As a trump card, Targa models are also equipped as standard with ‘Porsche Wet mode’ which because of the baking hot dry weather I had no chance to sample.

The car-maker explains: ‘Sensors fitted in the front wheel housings are capable of detecting water on the road surface and, if significant volumes of water are picked up, a signal in the cockpit provides a recommendation for the driver to manually switch to Wet mode.

'The vehicle drive systems are then adapted to the conditions to guarantee maximum driving stability.’

For the first time the new car is also fitted with Porsche ‘InnoDrive’ which includes adaptive cruise control.

An enhanced Smartlift function enables ground clearance to be programmed so the front ride height can be raised.

In the UK Porsche is offering customers a chance to test their new car’s potential and develop their own driving skills around a track at the Porsche Experience Centre at Silverstone. I should take it because there’s a limit to what you can do on the road - and keep your licence – in this car.

Starting price for the car I drove is £109,725 but mine was packed with nearly £20,000 of ‘extras’ which bumped the final price up by the cost of a decent new family hatchback to £129,172.

These additional add-ons included the Sport Chrono Package (£1,683), rear-axle steering (£1,592), adaptive sports-seats plus with 18-way memory (£2,315), carbon matt interior (£1,263), tinted lED main headlights with matric (£2,487), a sports exhaust system with black tail-pipes (£1,844), a heated leather GT sports steering wheel (£383) black high-gloss wheels (£842) and Carrera White Metallic paint (£876).

A drop in the ocean for super-rich cool-cats like Jay Kay, but certainly not Virtual Insanity. Take one for a spin and let me know what you think. I’ve already primed Porsche.

A brief history lesson on Porsche's open-top 911

The original 911 Targa 2.0 which was unveiled in 1965 at the Frankfurt Motor Show and put into full production the following year, became ‘a trailblazer for a whole new type of car’.

It was originally marketed as a ‘safety cabriolet with anti-roll bar’ in response to increased safety legislation in America.

But the Targa with its detachable roof soon established itself in its own right.

The name ‘Targa’ comes from the Targa Florio race. Since the mid-sixties has been synonymous with Porsche’s concept of open driving.

In 1996 model the Targa’s entire roof was made of glass with an electric sliding glass cover above the driver and front seat passenger that could be lowered and retracted beneath the hinged rear glass window.

In 2014 Porsche introduced an integrated folding powered roof mechanism which the new eight generation Targa has refined.

*The road test was carried out in compliance with corona-virus safety and self-distancing measures instituted by Porsche GB

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