Entertainment: Plenty of Fantasy in HBO’s ‘Chernobyl,’ but the Truth Is Real - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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EntertainmentPlenty of Fantasy in HBO’s ‘Chernobyl,’ but the Truth Is Real

12:05  03 june  2019
12:05  03 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

"She Was A Truth Ninja:" Emily Watson On Her Intrepid Chernobyl Character

After reactor 4 of the Chernboyl Nuclear Power Plant explodes in the HBO mini-series Chernobyl, it quickly becomes apparent that there are two types of people in power. There are the Soviet officials who sit in rooms and deem the meltdown "impossible," and in doing so allow the situation to worsen. Then, there are people like Ulana Khomyuk, the intrepid nuclear physicist from nearby Belarus played by Emily Watson, who recognise the enormity of the danger — and quickly mobilise. Unlike many of the the characters on the mini-series, Ulana doesn't exactly correspond to a real person from history. Rather, Ulana is based on a composite of many unnamed historical figures.

Did those miners really get naked? 'Midnight in Chernobyl ' author Adam Higginbotham helps There is plenty of film and photographic footage suggesting that the miners worked clothed, not More broadly, one of the chief reasons I wrote Midnight In Chernobyl was to make sure that those involved in what happened emerged as real people ' Chernobyl ' on HBO : The Truth About Biorobots, the J

The HBO series " Chernobyl " gets plenty of things right about the nuclear power plant disaster that most likely exposed hundreds of thousands of Retelling the 1986 Chernobyl disaster is an exercise in unburying the truth . In the wake of the world' s worst nuclear power plant accident, which forced the

Plenty of Fantasy in HBO’s ‘Chernobyl,’ but the Truth Is Real © HBO Chernobyl: 'Plenty of fantasy but the truth is real' Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Henry Fountain is a science writer on the Climate desk of The New York Times. He toured the Chernobyl plant and the exclusion zone around it in 2014.

The first thing to understand about the HBO mini-series “Chernobyl,” which concludes its five-part run on Monday, is that a lot of it is made up. But here’s the second, and more important, thing: It doesn’t really matter.

The explosion and fire at Chernobyl’s Unit 4 reactor on April 26, 1986, was an extraordinarily messy and grim event, a radioactive “dirty” bomb on a scale that no one — certainly not anyone in the Soviet Union — was prepared for. It remains the worst disaster in the history of nuclear power, killing more than 30 people initially (and more in the years that followed, though the numbers are much disputed) and spreading radioactive contamination across large swaths of Soviet and European territory.

Watch the first Final Fantasy VII Remake gameplay trailer in nearly four years

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Allison Keene reviews the HBO limited series Chernobyl , which chronicles the infamous nuclear For us, this is a story about truth . The last thing we wanted to do was fall into the same trap that liars fall Image via HBO . Chernobyl is stocked with an excellent cast (who do not attempt any real accents

HBO . How many people died as a direct cause of the Chernobyl explosion? Aside from the lasting dangers of the radioactive explosion, the initial The creative team behind the show strove to capture the atmosphere of fear on that day, especially in the portrayal of real -life firefighter Vasily Ignatenko.

Plenty of Fantasy in HBO’s ‘Chernobyl,’ but the Truth Is Real © Liam Daniel/HBO From left, Stellan Skarsgard as Boris Shcherbina, Jared Harris as Valery Legasov and Emily Watson as Ulana Khomyuk. In the immediate panicked aftermath, and in the months of crisis and confusion until the completion seven months later of the concrete-and-steel sarcophagus that entombed the reactor’s lethal remains, the heroes and villains numbered in the hundreds, and the supporting cast in the hundreds of thousands.

The producers of the mini-series don’t sanitise the disaster (sometimes the gore even goes a little too far: The radiation victims are often covered in blood for some reason). Instead, they simplify. They leave the grim alone, but the demands of Hollywood, and of production budgets, take a toll on the messy.

Opinion: Chernobyl is the best thing on TV

Opinion: Chernobyl is the best thing on TV Opinion: Chernobyl is the best thing on TV

Liam Daniel/ HBO . Not a laugh riot, Chernobyl is not a title that prepares you for good times and happy puppies. The series is a vivid and detailed retelling of the cataclysm. It begins as a near- real -time thriller, following the confused reactions of various people standing way too close to the nuclear reactor.

If HBO ' s ‘ Chernobyl ’ Was Made by Russians. Creating a compelling drama about the nuclear disaster would be one way for post-Soviet nations to show There are two reasons for this. One is authenticity — despite a valiant attempt at it, the series falls short. But the other, more important reason is that

That’s not to say there aren’t many touches of verisimilitude. The rooftop scene in which conscripts have just seconds to toss radioactive debris to the ground is as otherworldly as it must have seemed to those who were there three decades ago. And the Unit 4 control room is faithfully re-created, from the control-rod dials on the walls to the white coats and caps worn by the operators. (When I visited the adjacent Unit 3 control room five years ago, I had to wear the same odd outfit, which seemed more appropriate for a bakery than a nuclear power plant.)

Plenty of Fantasy in HBO’s ‘Chernobyl,’ but the Truth Is Real © Rudi Blaha/Associated Press Valery Legasov, head of the Soviet delegation at the Chernobyl Review Conference in Vienna, Aug. 29, 1986. But if you didn’t know much about Chernobyl you could be forgiven if, after watching, you thought the entire response and cleanup was run by two people, Valery Legasov and Boris Shcherbina, aided valiantly by a third, Ulana Khomyuk.

The Creator of Chernobyl on Viewers Taking Away the Wrong Lessons

The Creator of Chernobyl on Viewers Taking Away the Wrong Lessons The Creator of Chernobyl on Viewers Taking Away the Wrong Lessons

Plenty of other reviews cite personal experience, a parent or spouse who experienced Chernobyl and who’s story matches up with HBO ’ s show. Beyond the somewhat surprising news that a brand new HBO miniseries is dominating IMDb’s TV ' Chernobyl ' on HBO : The Truth About Biorobots, the J

As viewers reach the mid-way point in HBO ’ s Chernobyl , many are wondering just how accurate of a depiction the series really is. Episode 1 of Chernobyl lays out the initial incident. After a test situation goes wrong, one of the reactors catches on fire and a subsequent meltdown of the core

You could also be forgiven if you thought they were all real characters. Legasov and Shcherbina were real, though their roles were twisted and amplified to meet the script’s need to keep things moving. Khomyuk, on the other hand, was made out of whole cloth, and her actions strain credulity, from travelling to Chernobyl, uninvited, to investigate the accident to being in the presence of Mikhail Gorbachev at the Kremlin not much later.

The producers mention some folderol at the end, that Khomyuk was a composite character created to represent all of the scientists who helped investigate the disaster. Fine, I guess. But much of the rest of “Chernobyl” gets the simplistic Hollywood treatment, too.

Watch: Chernobyl trailer (Evening Standard)

There are the brave, doomed firefighters, ignorant of the radiation hazards they encountered (though nobody climbed up over the reactor debris, as portrayed in the series; they were working the roof to prevent fires from spreading to the undamaged Unit 3). The plucky, can-do miners, brought in to excavate under the reactor to stop the meltdown, stripping naked to get the job done (the series doesn’t say this, but their work ended up largely for naught). The no-nonsense helicopter pilots, risking radiation sickness to drop their loads of lead, boron and sand on the reactor (while one helicopter did crash, killing its crew, the accident happened months later, and radiation had nothing to do with it).

I could go on. Don’t get me started about that blue light from the exposed reactor shining high into the night sky in the first episode. Yes, nuclear reactors can produce a blue hue, from something called Cherenkov radiation, but no, there’s no way Unit 4 would have looked like the “Tribute in Light” in Lower Manhattan on the anniversary of Sept. 11.

HBO’s Chernobyl is a terrific miniseries. Its writer hopes you don’t think it’s the whole truth.

HBO’s Chernobyl is a terrific miniseries. Its writer hopes you don’t think it’s the whole truth. Craig Mazin on turning disaster into great TV and narrative poison. HBO’s terrific five-episode miniseries Chernobyl has two big surprises up its sleeve. The first is just how compelling and watchable it is, despite being what amounts to an incredibly grim horror story about the people who sacrificed their lives after a reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded in 1986, so that the situation wouldn’t grow even worse. It is matter-of-fact about the sheer scale of the pain and trauma these people experienced, and what had to be done to ultimately save the world.

Chernobyl is a five-part historical drama television miniseries created and written by Craig Mazin, and directed by Johan Renck. A co-production between HBO and Sky UK

HBO ' s Chernobyl Isn't Just a Historical Drama—It's a Warning. The real leads don’t come to the fore until the day after the explosion. Legasov is a renowned nuclear physicist; Boris Shcherbina (Stellan At its best, however, Chernobyl demonstrates what happens when societies stop listening to science.

In the end, though, none of this really matters. For the mini-series gets a basic truth right — that the Chernobyl disaster was more about lies, deceit and a rotting political system than it was about bad engineering or abysmal management and training (or, for that matter, about whether nuclear power is inherently good or bad).

Gallery: Ghosts of Chernobyl (Reuters)

“Chernobyl” is grim only partly because of all the destruction and death. The need to constantly lie (or cope with the lies of higher-ups) weighs on its characters as heavily as all the lead that was dropped on the reactor.

Yes, this basic truth is simplified, too, especially in the final episode, which portrays the trial of three power plant officials.

I don’t want to give away much about these scenes, though I will reveal that the geeky term “positive void coefficient” — one of the reactor’s design flaws — was uttered. (As a science writer, I was overjoyed.)

Plenty of Fantasy in HBO’s ‘Chernobyl,’ but the Truth Is Real © HBO In the show, a fire rages at the Unit 4 reactor. The scenes have a lot of tension, and are among the best in the whole mini-series. But they seem drawn more from American movie courtrooms than from Soviet jurisprudence. The idea of someone speaking truth to power in this court seems about as far-fetched as anything else in the whole of “Chernobyl.”

How the show gets to its truth, however, is less important than that it gets there. Viewers may come away from “Chernobyl” realising that, together, people and machines can do awful things — like create a nuclear catastrophe for the ages. If they also come away understanding that in this case, that outcome was more the fault of a government and its apparatchiks, so much the better.

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