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Entertainment Space calendar 2021: Rocket launches, sky events, missions & more!

03:15  24 march  2021
03:15  24 march  2021 Source:   space.com

Space calendar 2021: Rocket launches, sky events, missions & more!

  Space calendar 2021: Rocket launches, sky events, missions & more! Here's a guide to all the rocket launches and astronomical events in 2021, as well as milestones for space missions, anniversaries and conferences.Watch NASA webcasts and other live launch coverage on our "Watch Live" page, and see our night sky webcasts here. Find out what's up in the night sky this month with our visible planets guide and skywatching forecast.

Q1: A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its first mission from a new launch pad at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia. It will launch an experimental mission for the U.S. Air Force's Space Test Program called Monolith, which carries a space weather instrument. Q2: A Chinese Long March 7 rocket will launch the Tianzhou 2 cargo resupply ship on the first cargo delivery mission to the Chinese space station. It will lift off from the Wenchang Space Launch Center in China's Hainan province. Mid- 2021 : An Arianespace Vega C rocket will launch the LARES 2 satellite

Q1: A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its first mission from a new launch pad at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia. It will launch an experimental mission for the U.S. Air Force's Space Test Program called Monolith, which carries a space weather instrument. Mid- 2021 : A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Progress 78P cargo resupply spacecraft to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Please send any corrections, updates or suggested calendar additions to hweitering@ space .com.

LAST UPDATED March 23: These dates are subject to change, and will be updated throughout the year as firmer dates arise. Please DO NOT schedule travel based on a date you see here. Launch dates collected from NASA, ESA, Roscosmos, Spaceflight Now and others.

There's a lot going in space this year. Check out our up-to-date space launch schedule and calendar here! © Provided by Space There's a lot going in space this year. Check out our up-to-date space launch schedule and calendar here!

Watch NASA webcasts and other live launch coverage on our "Watch Live" page, and see our night sky webcasts here. Find out what's up in the night sky this month with our visible planets guide and skywatching forecast.

Wondering what happened today in space history? Check out our "On This Day in Space" video show here!

Here's how NASA just booked a last-minute trip to space on a Russian Soyuz

  Here's how NASA just booked a last-minute trip to space on a Russian Soyuz It's no easy feat to get to space with just two months' notice — even for NASA.But in February, the agency announced it wanted a seat on the next Russian Soyuz launch, currently scheduled to lift off on April 9. And unlike recent flights, when NASA has paid Russia to ferry astronauts to and from the International Space Station, the agency wants to instead exchange, likely, a flight on a U.S. spaceship.

Related: Space calendar 2021 : Rocket launches , sky events , missions & more . Mercury's position below the shallowly-dipping morning ecliptic (green line) will make this a poor apparition for mid-Northern latitude observers, but the best showing of 2021 for those located near the Equator, and farther south. Tuesday, March 9 — Old moon meets Saturn (pre-dawn).

Here's a guide to all the rocket launches and astronomical events in 2020, as well as milestones for space missions , anniversaries and conferences. 10: A Chinese Long March 11 rocket will launch the Gravitational Wave High-energy Electromagnetic Counterpart All- sky Monitor (GECAM) mission from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in southwest China.

March

March 24: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX's Starlink broadband network in a mission designated Starlink 22. It will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, at 4:28 a.m. EDT (0828 GMT). Watch it live

Brexit Britain must lead ‘space industrial revolution' to preserve humanity claims expert

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Backed by grants from the Space Studies Institute, later prototypes improved on the mass driver concept, showing that a mass driver only 520 feet (160 meters) long could launch material off the surface of the moon. Electromagnetic mass drivers using solar power could provide low-cost transportation of materials to space construction sites. Space calendar 2021 : Rocket launches , sky events , missions & more ! By Hanneke Weitering March 10, 2021 .

Q1: A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its first mission from a new launch pad at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia. It will launch an experimental mission for the U.S. Air Force's Space Test Program called Monolith, which carries a space weather instrument. Mid- 2021 : A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Progress 78P cargo resupply spacecraft to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Please send any corrections, updates or suggested calendar additions to hweitering@ space .com.

March 24: Arianespace will use a Soyuz rocket to launch 36 satellites into orbit for the OneWeb internet constellation. It will lift off from the Vostochny Cosmodrome in Siberia, at 10:47 p.m. EDT (0247 March 25 GMT). Watch it live

New on Disney Plus in April 2021: All the new movies and shows

  New on Disney Plus in April 2021: All the new movies and shows There's a lot to watch on Disney Plus in AprilPlus, there's a whole bunch of movies and shows being added to Disney Plus in the UK courtesy of Star, including Bob's Burgers Criminal Minds, and, excitingly, the Oscar-nominated Nomadland. That's just the start of it, too, so without further ado: here's everything new on Disney Plus in the US and the UK in April 2021, with the three of the biggest highlights at the top.

Q1: A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its first mission from a new launch pad at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia. It will launch an experimental mission for the U.S. Air Force's Space Test Program called Monolith, which carries a space weather instrument. Mid- 2021 : A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Progress 78P cargo resupply spacecraft to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Please send any corrections, updates or suggested calendar additions to hweitering@ space .com.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 60 of the company's Starlink broadband internet satellites into orbit and landed back Space calendar 2021 : Rocket launches , sky events , missions & more ! Get breaking space news and the latest updates on rocket launches , skywatching events and more !

March 28: The full moon of March, known as the Full Worm Moon, arrives at 2:48 p.m. EDT (1817 GMT).

March 28: India's Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (designated GSLV-F10) will launch India's first GEO Imaging Satellite, or GISAT 1. It will lift off from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, India.

Mortal Kombat movie and Venom 2 release dates pushed back

  Mortal Kombat movie and Venom 2 release dates pushed back Both movies will now release a week later than plannedMortal Kombat will now debut in theaters and on HBO Max on April 23 instead of April 16, while the Venom sequel is now set for theatrical release on September 24 instead of September 17.

March 28: Venus reaches its greatest brightness in its 2021 evening apparition, shining brightly at magnitude -3.9. Catch the planet just above the western horizon at sunset.

April

April 6: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waning crescent moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the dawn sky.

Robert Kirkman teases work may have already begun on Invincible season 2

  Robert Kirkman teases work may have already begun on Invincible season 2 Invincible creator Robert Kirkman teases he may already be working on season 2 of Invincible at AmazonThe eight-episode animated superhero series, which has begun streaming on Amazon, follows teenager Mark Grayson as he struggles to balance a seemingly everyday high school life with the recent discovery that, much like his superhero father Omni-Man, he too has otherworldly abilities.

April 7: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waning crescent moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the dawn sky.

UK braced for 'space war' as Russia fires fearsome weapon - satellites could be shot down

  UK braced for 'space war' as Russia fires fearsome weapon - satellites could be shot down THE UK is facing a terrifying "space war" with Russia, after Vladimir Putin fired new weapons capable of shooting down missiles.The developments come after RAF senior officer Sir Mike Wigstone urged Britain to catch up with Russian military expansion into space.

April 9: A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz MS-18 spacecraft to the International Space Station with NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei and two Russian cosmonauts, Oleg Novitsky and Pyotr Dubrov. It will lift off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, at 3:42 a.m. EDT (0742 GMT). The Soyuz MS-18 is scheduled to arrive at the space station at 6:47 a.m. EDT (1047 GMT). Watch it live

SpaceX's Starship rocket explodes once again on landing ... yet it is a success

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April 11: The new moon arrives at 10:31 p.m. EDT (0231 April 12 GMT).

April 15: Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryzhikov, commander of International Space Station Expedition 64, will hand over command of the station to NASA astronaut Shannon Walker, who arrived with the SpaceX Crew-1 mission in November 2020. This will mark the start of ISS Expedition 65.

April 16-17: NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov will return to Earth from the International Space Station in their Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft. The spacecraft will undock from the ISS at 9:34 p.m. EDT (0134 April 17 GMT) and land near Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on April 17 at 12:57 a.m. EDT (0457 GMT). Watch it live

April 17: Lunar occultation of Mars. The waxing crescent moon will briefly pass in front of the planet Mars for skywatchers in parts of Asia. Elsewhere in the world, the moon will make a close approach to Mars. Look for the pair above the western horizon after sunset.

April 19: An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV18, will launch the Pléiades Neo 1 Earth observation satellite for Airbus and multiple rideshare payloads. The mission will lift off from the Guiana Spaceport near Kourou, French Guiana, at 9:50 p.m. EDT (0150 April 20 GMT). Watch it live

April 22: A SpaceX Crew Dragon will launch the Crew-2 mission to the International Space Station for NASA. On board will be four crewmembers: NASA astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur, JAXA astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet. It will lift off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, at 6:11 a.m. EDT (1011 GMT). Watch it live

April 21-22: The Lyrid meteor shower, which is active April 16-30, peaks overnight.

April 26: The full moon of April, known as the Full Pink Moon, arrives at 11:32 p.m. EDT (0332 April 27 GMT). Because the moon will also be near perigee, or its closest point to Earth, this will also be a so-called "supermoon."

Also scheduled to launch in April (from Spaceflight Now):

  • A Chinese Long March 5B rocket will launch Tianhe 1, the core module for a Chinese space station low Earth orbit.
  • A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The mission, titled NROL-82, will lift off from Space Launch Complex 6 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.
  • India's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch on its first orbital test flight from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, India.
  • The SpaceX Crew-1 mission will return to Earth with NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi, in late April or early May. Watch it live

May

May 3: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The last-quarter moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the dawn sky.

May 4: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waning crescent moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the dawn sky.

May 4: Star Wars Day. (May the Fourth be with you.)

May 4-5: The Eta Aquarid meteor shower, which is active from mid-April to the end of May, peaks overnight.

May 11: The new moon arrives at 3 p.m. EDT (1900 GMT).

May 15: Mercury reaches its highest point in the evening sky, shining brightly at magnitude 0.3. See it just above the western horizon right after sunset.

May 16: Conjunction of the moon and Mars. The waxing crescent moon will swing about 2 degrees to the south of Mars in the evening sky.

May 17: Mercury at greatest elongation east. The innermost planet will reach its greatest eastern separation from the sun, shining brightly at magnitude 0.3. Catch the elusive planet above the western horizon shortly after sunset.

May 26: The full moon of May, known as the Full Flower Moon, arrives at 7:14 a.m. EDT (1114 GMT). It will also be the closest "supermoon" of the year. That night, a total lunar eclipse, also known as a "Blood Moon," will be visible from Australia, parts of the western United States, western South America and Southeast Asia.

May 30: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waning gibbous moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the dawn sky.

Also scheduled to launch in May (from Spaceflight Now):

  • Starliner OFT-2: A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its second uncrewed mission to the International Space Station, following a partial failure in December 2019. The Orbital Flight Test 2 (OFT-2) mission will lift off from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Watch it live
  • Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA254, to launch the Star One D2 and Eutelsat Quantum communications satellites from the Guiana Spaceport near Kourou, French Guiana. Watch it live
  • A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the U.S. Space Force's fifth Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous satellite (SBIRS GEO 5) from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
  • China's Tianwen-1 Mars rover will touch down on the Red Planet.

June

June 1: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. Just one day before reaching last-quarter phase, the waning gibbous moon will swing about 5 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the dawn sky.

June 1: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Transporter 2 rideshare mission with several small satellites for commercial and government customers. It will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Watch it live

June 10: The new moon arrives at 6:53 a.m. EDT (1053 GMT).

June 10: An annular solar eclipse, also known as a "ring of fire" eclipse, will be visible from parts of Russia, Greenland and and northern Canada. Skywatchers in Northern Asia, Europe and the United States will see a partial eclipse.

June 13: Conjunction of the moon and Mars. The waxing crescent moon will swing about 3 degrees to the south of Mars in the evening sky.

June 20: The solstice arrives at 11:16 p.m. EDT (0316 June 21 GMT), marking the first day of summer in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter in the Southern Hemisphere.

June 24: The full moon of June, known as the Full Strawberry Moon, arrives at 2:40 p.m. EDT (1940 GMT).

June 27: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waning gibbous moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the dawn sky.

June 28: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waning gibbous moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the dawn sky.

June 30: A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Progress 78P cargo resupply spacecraft to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Also scheduled to launch in June (from Spaceflight Now):

  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Dragon cargo resupply mission (CRS-22) to the International Space Station. It will lift off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Watch it live
  • A U.S. Air Force and Northrop Grumman Minotaur 1 rocket will launch a classified spy satellite for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office in a mission called NROL-111. It will lift off from Pad 0B at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia. Watch it live
  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Turksat 5B communications satellite from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Watch it live

July

July 5: Happy aphelion day! Earth is farthest from the sun today.

July 9: Mercury reaches its highest point in the morning sky, shining brightly at magnitude 0.3. See it just above the southeast horizon just before sunrise.

July 9: The new moon arrives at 9:16 p.m. EDT (0116 July 10 GMT)

July 12: Conjunction of the moon and Venus. The waxing crescent moon will pass about 3 degrees to the north of Venus

July 23: The full moon of July, known as the Full Buck Moon, arrives at 10:37 p.m. EDT (0237 July 24 GMT).

July 24: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The full moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the dawn sky.

July 25: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waning crescent moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the dawn sky.

Also scheduled to launch in July (from Spaceflight Now):

  • A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF-44 mission for the U.S. Air Force. The mission will lift off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and is expected to deploy two undisclosed payloads into geosynchronous orbit.
  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will the U.S. Space Force's fifth third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System (GPS 3 SV05). It will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.
  • India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) will launch the Indian RISAT 1A radar Earth observation satellite from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, India.
  • India's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch its first commercial mission with four Earth observation satellites for the Seattle-based company BlackSky Global. It will lift off from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, India.

August

Aug. 2: Saturn at opposition. The ringed planet will be directly opposite the sun in Earth's sky around the same time that it makes its closest approach to Earth all year. This means it will appear at its biggest and brightest of the year. Saturn will reach its highest point in the night sky around midnight.

Aug. 8: The new moon arrives at 9:50 a.m. EDT (1350 GMT)

Aug. 11: Conjunction of the moon and Venus. The waxing crescent moon will pass about 4 degrees to the north of Venus. Look for the pair above the western horizon after sunset.

Aug. 11-12: The annual Perseid meteor shower, which is active from mid-July to the end of August, peaks overnight.

Aug. 18: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Dragon cargo resupply mission (CRS-23) to the International Space Station. It will lift off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Watch it live

Aug. 19: Jupiter at opposition. The gas giant will be directly opposite the sun in Earth's sky around the same time that it makes its closest approach to Earth of the year. The planet will shine at its biggest and brightest tonight and will be visible all night long.

Aug. 20: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waxing gibbous moon will swing about 3 degrees to the south of Saturn in the evening sky.

Aug. 21: A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Progress 79 cargo resupply spacecraft to the International Space Station. It will lift off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Aug. 22: The full moon of August, known as the Full Sturgeon Moon, occurs at 8:02 a.m. EDT (1202 GMT). This will also be a so-called "Blue Moon" because it is the third full moon in a season that has four full moons.

Aug. 22: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The Blue Sturgeon moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the night sky.

Also scheduled to launch in August (from Spaceflight Now):

  • A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the USSF-8 mission for the Space Force's Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program (GSSAP). It will lift off from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Watch it live

September

Sept. 3: Mercury reaches its highest point in the evening sky. Shining at magnitude 0.1, the innermost planet will be barely visible above the western horizon at sunset.

Sept. 6: The new moon arrives at 8:52 p.m. EDT (0052 Sept. 7 GMT).

Sept. 9: Conjunction of the moon and Venus. The waxing crescent moon will pass about 4 degrees to the north of Venus. Look for the pair above the western horizon after sunset.

Sept. 13: Mercury at greatest elongation east. The innermost planet will reach its greatest eastern separation from the sun, shining brightly at magnitude 0.1. Catch the elusive planet above the western horizon shortly after sunset.

Sept. 13: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the Crew-3 mission, the third operational astronaut flight to the International Space Station. On board will be NASA astronauts Raja Chari and Thomas Marshburn, and European Space Agency astronaut Matthias Maurer. (The fourth crewmember has not yet been announced). It will lift off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Sept. 14: Neptune at opposition. The gas giant will appear at its biggest and brightest of the year, shining at magnitude 7.8. (You'll need a telescope to see it.)

Sept. 16: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waxing gibbous moon will swing about 3 degrees to the south of Saturn in the evening sky.

Sept. 18: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waxing gibbous moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the evening sky.

Sept. 20: The full moon of September, known as the Full Harvest Moon, occurs at 7:55 p.m. EDT (2355 GMT).

Sept. 22: The equinox arrives at 3:21 p.m. EDT (1921 GMT), marking the first day of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere.

Sept. 22: A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Soyuz MS-19 crew capsule to the International Space Station with Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov and two space tourists: Russian film director Klim Shipenko and a (not-yet-named) Russian actress, who plan to film a movie while spending one week in space. (The two filmmakers are scheduled to return to Earth on the Soyuz MS-18 crew capsule.) Watch it live

Sept. 24: The waning gibbous moon and Uranus will make a close approach, passing within 1.3 degrees of each other. Shining at magnitude 5.7, Uranus may be bright enough to spot with the naked eye under dark skies.

Also scheduled to launch in September (from Spaceflight Now):

  • An Arianespace Soyuz rocket will launch two satellites for Europe's Galileo navigation constellation. It will lift off from the Guiana Space Center near Kourou, French Guiana.
  • Boeing plans to launch the first crewed test flight of its Starliner spacecraft, which will send NASA astronauts Mike Fincke, Nicole Mann, and Barry "Butch" Wilmore to the International Space Station on an Atlas V rocket. The mission will lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Watch it live
  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the first two WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Watch it live

October

Oct. 6: The new moon arrives at 7:05 a.m. EDT (1105 GMT)

Oct. 8: The Draconid meteor shower, which is active Oct. 6-10, will peak overnight.

Oct. 9: Conjunction of the moon and Venus. The waxing crescent moon will pass about 3 degrees to the north of Venus. Look for the pair above the western horizon after sunset.

Oct. 14: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waxing gibbous moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the evening sky.

Oct. 15: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waxing gibbous moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the evening sky.

Oct. 16: NASA will launch its Lucy mission to study the Trojan asteroids. It will lift off from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Watch it live

Oct. 20: The full moon of October, known at the Full Hunter's Moon, occurs at 10:57 a.m. EDT (1457 GMT).

Oct. 21: The waning gibbous moon and Uranus will make a close approach, passing within 1.3 degrees of each other. Shining at magnitude 5.7, Uranus may be bright enough to spot with the naked eye under dark skies.

Oct. 21-22: The annual Orionid meteor shower, which is active all month long, peaks overnight.

Oct. 24: Mercury at greatest elongation west. The innermost planet will reach its greatest western separation from the sun, shining brightly at magnitude -0.6. Catch the elusive planet above the eastern horizon shortly before sunrise. The following day (Oct. 25) Mercury will reach its highest point in the morning sky.

Oct. 31: NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is scheduled to lift off from the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana, on an Ariane 5 ECA rocket. Watch it live

Also scheduled to launch in October (from Spaceflight Now):

  • A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 52 mission for the U.S. Space Force. It will lift off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
  • The Soyuz MS-18 crew capsule will return to Earth from the International Space Station with Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky, as well as two space tourists: Russian film director Klim Shipenko and a (not-yet-named) Russian actress, who will have arrived on the Soyuz MS-19 mission in September and plan to film a movie in space. Watch it live

November

Nov. 2-3: The annual South Taurid meteor shower peaks overnight. Active from mid-September to mid-November, the Southern Taurids rarely produce more than five visible meteors per hour, but the nearly-new moon should make them easier to spot against a dark sky.

Nov. 4: The new moon arrives at 5:15 p.m. EDT (2115 GMT).

Nov. 4: Uranus is at opposition, meaning it will appear at its biggest and brightest of the year. Shining at magnitude 5.7, the planet will be visible all night long in the constellation Aries. Uranus may be to the naked eye from dark locations but is best seen through a telescope or binoculars.

Nov. 7: Daylight Saving Time ends. Turn your clocks back one hour at 2 a.m. local time.

Nov. 8: Conjunction of the moon and Venus. The waxing crescent moon will pass about 1 degree to the north of Venus. Look for the pair above the western horizon after sunset. Skywatchers in parts of Eastern Asia will see the moon occult Venus, meaning it will briefly pass in front of the planet, blocking it from sight.

Nov. 10: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waxing crescent moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the evening sky.

Nov. 11: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The first-quarter moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the evening sky.

Nov. 11-12: The annual North Taurid meteor shower peaks overnight. The shower, which is active from late October to mid-December, is not expected to produce more than a handful of visible "shooting stars" per hour.

Nov. 16-17: One of the most anticipated meteor showers of the year, the Leonid meteor shower peaks overnight. The Leonids are expected to produce about 15 meteors per hour on the night of the peak, but the shower is active all month long.

Nov. 17: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the NASA's Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Nov. 19: The full moon of November, known as the Full Beaver Moon, occurs at 3:58 a.m. EST (0858 GMT).

Nov. 19: A partial lunar eclipse will be visible from North and South America, Australia, and parts of Europe and Asia. The moon will enter Earth's faint outer shadow, known as the penumbra, at 1:02 a.m. EDT (0602 GMT). The partial eclipse, when the moon will darken more noticeably, begins at 2:18 a.m. EDT (0718 GMT). Maximum eclipse occurs at 4:02 a.m. EDT (0902 GMT). The entire event will last about six hours.

Nov. 24: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

December

Dec. 4: The only total solar eclipse of the year (and the last total solar eclipse until 2023) will be visible from Antarctica. Skywatchers in South Africa, Namibia, the southern tip of South America and some islands in the South Atlantic will be able to see at least a partial solar eclipse, with the moon blocking a portion of the sun from view.

Dec. 4: The new moon arrives at 2:44 a.m. EST (0744 GMT).

Dec. 6: Conjunction of the moon and Venus. The waxing crescent moon will pass about 2 degrees to the north of Venus. Look for the pair above the western horizon after sunset.

Dec. 7: A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the GOES-T weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. It will lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, at 4:40 p.m. EST (2140 GMT).

Dec. 7: Conjunction of the moon and Saturn. The waxing crescent moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Saturn in the evening sky.

Dec. 9: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waxing crescent moon will swing about 4 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the evening sky.

Dec. 13-14: The annual Geminid meteor shower, one of the best meteor showers of the year, peaks overnight. The Geminids are active Dec. 4-17 often produce up to 50 visible meteors per hours, but this year the 78% full moon will outshine the fainter meteors.

Dec. 18: The full moon of December, known as the Full Cold Moon, occurs at 11:37 p.m. EST (0437 Dec. 19 GMT).

Dec. 21: The solstice arrives at 10:59 a.m. EST (1559 GMT), marking the first day of winter in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer in the Southern Hemisphere.

Dec. 21-22: The annual Ursid meteor shower peaks overnight. Typically active around Dec. 17-26, the Ursids produce about five to 10 visible meteors per hour on the morning of the peak.

More coming in 2021...

Q1: A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the STP-3 rideshare mission for the U.S. Space Force. It will lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

Q1: A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its first mission from a new launch pad at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia. It will launch an experimental mission for the U.S. Air Force's Space Test Program called Monolith, which carries a space weather instrument.

Q2: A Chinese Long March 7 rocket will launch the Tianzhou 2 cargo resupply ship on the first cargo delivery mission to the Chinese space station. It will lift off from the Wenchang Space Launch Center in China's Hainan province.

Mid-2021: An Arianespace Vega C rocket will launch the LARES 2 satellite for the Italian space agency. It will lift off from the Guiana Space Center near Kourou, French Guiana.

Mid-2021: A Chinese Long March 2F rocket will launch the Shenzhou 12 spacecraft with multiple Chinese astronauts on the first crewed mission to the Chinese space station.

Please send any corrections, updates or suggested calendar additions to hweitering@space.com. Follow Space.com for the latest in space science and exploration news on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

SpaceX's Starship rocket explodes once again on landing ... yet it is a success .
© Copyright 2021, The Obs A prototype of SpaceX's future giant Starship rocket exploded on landing , Wednesday March 3 in Texas. However, unlike the two previous tests, carried out in December and February last , where the rockets had simply crashed into huge balls of fire, the aircraft this time managed to land in one piece. … Before exploding to the ground a few minutes later.

usr: 1
This is interesting!