Weird News: Scientists unearth 'most bird-like' dinosaur ever found - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Weird NewsScientists unearth 'most bird-like' dinosaur ever found

17:01  15 may  2019
17:01  15 may  2019 Source:   msn.com

Ancient bird that died 110-million-years-ago is found perfectly preserved with an egg inside its body

Ancient bird that died 110-million-years-ago is found perfectly preserved with an egg inside its body The 'incredibly well preserved' discovery was made by a team of scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr Bailleul said: 'The new fossil is incredibly well preserved, including the remains of an egg inside its abdomen. 'Because the specimen is crushed flat, it was only after a small fragment was extracted and analysed under the microscope that the team realised that the unusual tissue was an egg.

The finding has astonished experts because carnivorous dinosaurs were thought to have become smaller as they grew more bird - like . The team of scientists who unearthed the fossilised bone fragments in the Sunitezuoqi region believe it may not have been fully grown.

Identifying the largest dinosaurs ever lived isn’t an easy task, because it’s very rare to unearth a complete fossil. Furthermore, only a tiny percentage of these amazing animals ever fossilized, and most of these “lucky” bodies will remain buried underground forever. So, we may never know exactly

Scientists unearth 'most bird-like' dinosaur ever found © OLIVER RAUHUT, OLIVER RAUHUT The notches in the wing bones of the new specimen point to muscles which would have allowed it to actively flap its wings

Researchers in Germany have unearthed a new species of flying dinosaur that flapped its wings like a raven and could hold vital clues as to how modern-day birds evolved from their reptilian ancestors.

For more than a century and a half since its discovery in 1861, Archaeopteryx -- a small feathered dinosaur around the size of a crow that lived in marshland around 150 million years ago -- was widely considered to be the oldest flying bird.

Palaeontologists from Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) in Munich and the University of Fribourg examined rock formations in the German region of Bavaria, home to nearly all known Archaeopteryx specimens.

Ancient bird that died 110-million-years-ago is found perfectly preserved with an egg inside its body

Ancient bird that died 110-million-years-ago is found perfectly preserved with an egg inside its body The 'incredibly well preserved' discovery was made by a team of scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr Bailleul said: 'The new fossil is incredibly well preserved, including the remains of an egg inside its abdomen. 'Because the specimen is crushed flat, it was only after a small fragment was extracted and analysed under the microscope that the team realised that the unusual tissue was an egg.

Many dinosaurs possessed feathers. Birds evolved from small feathered dinosaurs near the end of the Jurassic Period. Caihong had fuzzy feathers and pennaceous ones, those that look like writing quills. It is the earliest known creature with asymmetrical feathers, a trait used by birds to steer when

One described the beast as “the most bizarre dinosaur ever found .” An upright posture, powerful hind legs and foreshortened front limbs were all But an inverted, bird - like hip structure and flattened, leaf-shaped teeth – proof of an exclusively vegetal diet – suggested that it also shared traits with another

They came across a petrified wing, which the team initially assumed to be the same species. They soon found several differences, however.

"There are similarities, but after detailed comparisons with Archaeopteryx and other, geologically younger birds, its fossil remains suggested that we were dealing with a somewhat more derived bird," said lead study author Oliver Rauhut from LMU's Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

Related slideshow: The world's most valuable dinosaurs ever found (provided by Lovemoney)

They called the new bird-like dinosaur Alcmonavis poeschli -- from the old Celtic word for a nearby river and the scientist who discovered the fossil, excavation leader Roland Poeschl.

The study, published in the journal eLife Sciences, said Alcmonavis poeschli was "the most bird-like bird discovered from the Jurassic".

Ancient 4-legged whale walked on land and swam in the sea, scientists say

Ancient 4-legged whale walked on land and swam in the sea, scientists say It had a large tail and four legs with hoofed toes that were likely webbed, making the creature well-adapted to both land and sea . Whales and dolphins were already known have adapted over the years from four-legged land animals as they transitioned to living in water. However, how they traveled from South Asia to South America remains a mystery. Researchers suggest the creatures likely crossed the south Atlantic Ocean from the western coast of Africa, assisted by surface currents.

Dinosaur bone unearthed in garden Jump to media player A dinosaur bone believed to be up to 130 million years old has been found in a back garden in The bones and eggs of a new 70-million-year-old dinosaur that resembled a flightless bird have been found in Patagonia, scientists say.

Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous herbivore dating from the Late A film crew from the BBC Natural History Unit was there to capture the moment the scientists realised "Without knowing more about this current find it's difficult to be sure. One problem with assessing the

As well as being significantly larger than Archaeopteryx, the new specimen had more notches in its wing bones that pointed to muscles which would have allowed it to actively flap its wings.

Significantly, this "flapping" trait found in Alcmonavis poeschli is present in more recent birds, but not in Archaeopteryx.

"This suggests that the diversity of birds in the late Jurassic era was greater than previously thought," Rauhut said.

The discovery is likely to fuel debate among dinosaur experts over whether birds and dinosaurs developed the ability to flap their wings from earlier gliding species.

"Its adaptation shows that the evolution of flight must have progressed relatively quickly," said Christian Foth, from the University of Fribourg, and a co-author of the research.

The bird that came back from the dead.
The bird that came back from the dead

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