Weird News: This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End. - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Weird NewsThis Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.

06:25  19 june  2019
06:25  19 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

Stone stackers defy gravity at European championships

Stone stackers defy gravity at European championships Expertly balancing one rock on top of another at the European Stone Stacking Championships, competitors combine skill and artistic creativity to come up with gravity-defying constructions. Now in its third year, the event takes place in the Scottish coastal town of Dunbar, east of the capital Edinburgh. Saturday's competition down on the Eye Cave Beach was all about quantity: the most stones balanced vertically in 30 minutes. Sunday's battle put the emphasis on artistic merit: creating anything from stones or found objects within three hours.

This creature 's gaze can petrify even the hardiest Earth dragons into stone . This creature 's scales present a particularly rich shade of red after it has freshly molted: Carmine Serthis. Frostbite Hummingbird. The scales of this cobra will stand on end when agitated, creating an impressive mane.

He notes to the others , though, that the creature won't go near the ashes of the previous night's bonfire, indicating that it hates fire. The group warns him, then are shocked to see him get out of his car and walk across the sand unmolested. Mitch realizes that the man's boots are protecting him.

This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End. © Marvin A. Altamia and Reuben Shipway A microscopy image of a nearly four-inch-long Lithoredo abatanica shipworm.

Lithoredo abatanica is an organism with an unusual appetite: This creature eats stone. And when it excretes, what comes out is sand, the leftovers of a still-mysterious digestion process.

The mollusk, unearthed from the bottom of a river in the Philippines, was introduced this week by an international group of scientists in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. It is a shipworm, a group of burrowing animals related to clams, but so different from known examples that it is both a new species and genus.

Dog's dinner: Labradoodle eats £160 of owners' cash

Dog's dinner: Labradoodle eats £160 of owners' cash Ozzie was already in the dog house after eating £160 of his owners' cash. But to add further insult to injury, the couple who own the naughty labradoodle had to fork out £130 in order to retrieve the eight £20 notes he wolfed down. © Other Ozzie ate the £20 notes. Pic: Murphy & Co Veterinary Practice Ozzie, a nine-year-old labradoodle, pounced when an envelope containing the cash was pushed through the letterbox of Neil and Judith Wright's homed in Llandudno, North Wales. © Other The notes are to be taken to the Bank of England.

Kangaroo rats live in sand dunes and sandy areas both near water and in desert-like places. They are active at night, when the temperatures are lower than the day, and spend much of the day inside their nests in the sand . Their broad hind feet are covered with hair, which helps them move quickly on top

The creatures , which attack anything that makes noise, have hypersensitive hearing and indestructible, armored skin. The Abbott family – wife Evelyn, husband Lee, congenitally deaf daughter Regan, and sons Marcus and Beau – silently scavenge for supplies in a deserted town.

Shipworms are usually known for their habit of eating wood. It’s right there in the name: They use their shells, attached to one end of their bodies, as chewing devices to burrow into and consume ship bottoms, docks and any other submerged wood. The behavior has made them the plague of mariners past and present, and in recent times, they have even sampled the delights of at least one New York City pier.

Wood-eating shipworms fascinate scientists because they digest pulverized wood with the help of symbiotic bacteria that live in their gills. The bacteria manufacture an array of enzymes and other substances, and studying them and finding new shipworms may prove helpful in the search for new antibiotics, a subject of interest to the scientists behind the new paper.

UAE plane crash victim named as former RAF man

UAE plane crash victim named as former RAF man One of three Britons who died in a light aircraft crash in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has been named as former RAF man Christopher Stone. Mr Stone was killed along with three other people on 16 May when their light aircraft crashed near Dubai International Airport. The Foreign Office is supporting Mr Stone's family, as well as the family of two other Britons who died in the crash. A South African person also died. © Other A plane similar to the one involved. Pic: Dubai Media Office In a statement, Mr Stone's family said: "Chris was a lovely person, always laughing and smiling.

However, the sea creatures that have been discovered recently have shown to be just downright creepy and terrifying. You probably recall the Angler Fish, especially if you’re seen the Disney movie, “Finding Nemo”. If you didn’t realize that this fish is the real deal, get ready for new additions to your

And why do Labradors eat everything? We find out in this guide to dogs that eat trash! Watch out for drooling, whining, loss of appetite, lethargy, restlessness or any other abnormal behavior Walking my dog today and she came accross a woodpigeon that was resting/hiding/ under some twigs nr a river

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This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.

They first heard reports of a mysterious shipworm in the Abatan River on Bohol Island some years ago, from an expedition organized by the French National Museum of Natural History. Reuben Shipway and Daniel Distel of Northeastern University, members of the Philippine Mollusk Symbiont International Collaborative Biodiversity Group, went in search of the creatures with snorkeling masks and chisels in tow.

A local resident suggested they check the bottom of the river; underwater, they spotted huge chunks of sandstone peppered with holes. Protruding from some of the rocks were the twin flags of shipworm siphons, organs that the creatures use to excrete.

“That was when we knew we’d struck shipworm gold,” said Dr. Shipway.

The researchers extracted the translucent white creatures from their burrows and performed various tests and dissections. That was when they learned more details about L. abatanica’s intriguing lifestyle.

The cecum, a large organ used in digesting wood that is common across shipworms, was missing in the new species. The shipworms’ guts, however, were full of fragments of stone, which chemical analysis showed to be the same stone that the animals were living in. What came out was stone, too.

This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End. © Marvin A. Altamia and Reuben Shipway Studying shipworms, including Lithoredo abatanica, could lead to discoveries of new antibiotics because of their symbiotic bacteria.

“We had a few animals in a makeshift aquarium,” said Dr. Shipway, “and you could put the animals in the aquarium and basically watch them excreting fine particles of sand out of their siphon.”

Exactly what the shipworms are getting from the stone is not yet clear. One possibility, the researchers speculate, is that the granules could be helping them grind up plankton and other creatures floating in the water, much the way gizzard stones help birds break down food they’ve swallowed whole.

But it may be that the worms are able to extract nutrients from the stone in a way not yet understood. The gills of the stone-eating shipworms are much larger than other shipworms’, suggesting that the organ’s tiny inhabitants may be particularly important to the creature’s survival. The team is now working on sequencing the genomes of L. abatanica’s symbionts to identify them and get a glimpse of how their metabolism works.

“It’s already looking very, very interesting,” said Dr. Distel. “What we can say is that the bacteria we find in the gills are not related to the bacteria we’ve found in any other shipworm to date.”

Ashes 2019: Injured Stone ruled out of Lord's Test.
Ashes 2019: Injured Stone ruled out of Lord's Test

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