Weird News: Scientists have taught rats to drive tiny cars - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Weird News Scientists have taught rats to drive tiny cars

06:55  25 october  2019
06:55  25 october  2019 Source:   news.sky.com

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Scientists have taught rats how to drive . When the rat puts its tiny paws on the copper bar, it completes a circuit that drives the little electric car forward, left, or right. The chassis is made of simple aluminum while the body is actually the discarded plastic remains of a food container that has been

Scientists at the University of Richmond found that rats ' stress levels go down when they drive little cars , so that whole rat -race myth is officially dead. When the researchers later checked the rodents' stress hormone ratios, they found that the rats that had been taught to drive showed an elevated

Researchers have taught rats to drive tiny little cars in order to receive treats in a study which could help scientists understand how learning skills affect the human mind and stress levels.

They discovered not only that rats can learn to drive little cars but that rats which were housed in an "enriched environment" designed to stimulate them with ladders and toys were able to learn better than a control group in normal housing.

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Scientists at the University of Richmond taught rats how to drive tiny little cars , New Scientist reported. The successful driving test demonstrated the rats had a greater ability to learn complex tasks than scientists previously thought possible.

Image: Scientists taught rats to drive little cars . Pic: University of Richmond. It advances her theory regarding "the well-grounded brain, the brain The study used a tiny car constructed from a plastic jug on wheels. The floor was made of aluminium, and three copper bars allowed the rat to steer by

According to Professor Kelly Lambert at the University of Richmond, Virginia, the study bears a lot of relevance for the way that the human mind works too.

It advances her theory regarding "the well-grounded brain, the brain which is engaged in authentic interactions with the real world and the social world rather than looking at Facebook."

The study used a tiny car constructed from a plastic jug on wheels. The floor was made of aluminium, and three copper bars allowed the rat to steer by gripping any of the bars with their pars, completing an electrical circuit.

a close up of a car: Scientists taught rats to drive little cars. Pic: University of Richmond © Getty Scientists taught rats to drive little cars. Pic: University of Richmond

In order to encourage the rats to learn to drive, the researchers placed a sweet cereal product within a particularly constructed arena.

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A team of scientists at the University of Richmond, Virginia have taught rats how to drive tiny cars around a track, New Scientist reports — a bold step in the study of animal cognition. The researchers are hoping to glean insight into how learning new skills can alleviate stress and how neurological

Rats can learn to drive tiny cars around an arena in exchange for a food reward. Rats have mastered the art of driving a tiny car , suggesting their brains are more flexible than we thought. The finding could be used to understand how learning new skills relieves stress and how neurological and

The team then attempted to push the rats to drive in more complicated ways by placing the treats in increasingly distant points from them and at difficult angles.

"They learned to navigate the car in unique ways and engaged in steering patterns they had never used to eventually arrive at the reward," said Prof Lambert.

Her study also examined the rats' droppings and discovered that learning to drive appeared to relax them, judging by the levels of stress hormones they were excreting.

a group of people in a room: The rats were more relaxed after learning to drive © Other The rats were more relaxed after learning to drive

According to Prof Lambert, who was interviewed by New Scientist, her study suggests that researchers could "potentially replace traditional maze tests with more complex driving tasks when using rat models to study neuropsychiatric conditions".

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