•   
  •   

Weird News Giant squid's genome is sequenced for the first time revealing that the legendary mysterious creature may be hugely intelligent

16:40  17 january  2020
16:40  17 january  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Frozen 18,000-year-old pup found in eastern Russia stuns scientists

  Frozen 18,000-year-old pup found in eastern Russia stuns scientists Scientists are stunned by the discovery of the well-preserved body of an 18,000-year-old puppy in far-eastern Russian Siberia, but experts are unsure whether it was a dog or a wolf. Russian scientists found the canine buried in permafrost deposits near Yakutsk, in the far-east of Russian Siberia, an area known for its rich paleontological significance.It was later sent to the Oxford University's Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit for dating, which revealed that the corpse was at least 18,000 years old. The creature would have lived during the Earth's Pleistocene period — commonly referred to as the last Ice Age.

the first time revealing that the legendary mysterious creature may be massively intelligent . Scientists have published the full genome sequence of the mysterious giant squid , which seems to hint ‘A genome is a first step for answering a lot of questions about the biology of these very weird

"Having this giant squid genome is an important node in helping us understand what makes a cephalopod a cephalopod. And it also can help us This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the

Scientists have published the full genome sequence of the mysterious giant squid, which seems to hint at the creature’s high intelligence.

An international research team found that their genes look a lot like other animals – with a genome size not far behind that of humans.

The mysterious squid, Architeuthius dux, has eyes as big as dinner plates and tentacles that snatch prey from 10 yards away.

Its average length is around 33 feet – approximately the size of an average-sized school bus.

But these legendary creatures are notoriously elusive and sightings are rare, making them difficult to study.

Now an international team of researchers have fully mapped the genome of the species to answer key evolutionary questions. 

Squid Brains Are Nearly as Complex as Dog Brains, Researchers Claim

  Squid Brains Are Nearly as Complex as Dog Brains, Researchers Claim We all know that cephalopods are wicked smart, and their complex nerve systems go some way to explain their aptitudes . Now, a first-of-its-kind magnetic resonance imaging study of squid brains confirms just how rich the connections in their brains truly are.Using high-resolution MRI and a suite of staining techniques, researchers have discovered and described previously unknown major neural pathways in squid.

Legendary Giant Squid ' s Genome Revealed . Wolf Puppies Spontaneously Play Fetch. Science News. from research organizations. The mysterious , legendary giant squid ' s genome is "A genome is a first step for answering a lot of questions about the biology of these very weird animals

16 (UPI) -- For the first time , scientists have successfully sequenced and annotated the genome of the The giant squid , Architeuthis dux, was first identified by Danish naturalist Japetus Steenstrup in "These new results may unlock several pending evolutionary questions regarding this mantled

In this photo released by Tsunemi Kubodera at Japan's National Science Museum, a giant squid attacking a bait squid is being pulled up by his research team off the Ogasawara Islands, south of Tokyo, in December 2006 © Provided by Daily Mail In this photo released by Tsunemi Kubodera at Japan's National Science Museum, a giant squid attacking a bait squid is being pulled up by his research team off the Ogasawara Islands, south of Tokyo, in December 2006

These include how they acquired the largest brain of all the invertebrates, as well as sophisticated behaviours and agility, and the skill of instantaneous camouflage.

‘A genome is a first step for answering a lot of questions about the biology of these very weird animals,’ said Caroline Albertin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Massachusetts.

‘While cephalopods have many complex and elaborate features, they are thought to have evolved independently of the vertebrates.

Modern Humans With African Ancestry Have More Neanderthal Genes Than We Thought

  Modern Humans With African Ancestry Have More Neanderthal Genes Than We Thought Deep inside our DNA lurks a legacy of lust and romance between estranged human bloodlines reconnecting on an epic journey around the globe. It now seems we might have been misreading key details in this erotic tale. A new method for analysing our genomes for traces of Neanderthal genes has revealed modern African populations – long assumed to be Neanderthal-free – also have a mixed heritage after all.

Giant squid ' s genome is sequenced for the first time revealing that the legendary mysterious creature may be hugely intelligent . Jaguar Land Rover unveils shape-shifting 'seat of the future' that tackles the health risks of sitting down for too long by making your brain think that you are walking.

January 15, 2020 | Revealed : The Mysterious , Legendary Giant Squid ’ s Genome . “Having this giant squid genome is an important node in helping us understand what makes a cephalopod a “Area X” of Zebra Finch May Provide Insights to Human Speech Disorders. Be the first to comment

‘By comparing their genomes we can ask, "Are cephalopods and vertebrates built the same way or are they built differently?”.’

Previously, Albertin led a team that sequenced the first genome of a cephalopod – the group that includes squid, octopus, cuttlefish, and nautilus. 

The team extracted genomic DNA from a single giant squid using cetyl trimethylammonium bromide - an ammonium surfactant compound.

They discovered the giant squid genome has an estimated 2.7 billion DNA base pairs – the connected chemical compounds on opposite sides of DNA strands.

This is about 90 per cent the size of the human genome – we have around 3 billion.

While genome size doesn’t necessarily equate to intelligence, it can hint at features such as cell division rate, body size, developmental rate and even extinction risk.

Albertin also identified more than 100 genes from the protocadherin family of proteins – typically not found in abundance in invertebrates – in the giant squid genome.

Very good dogs discover 65 million-year-old fossil skeleton while out for a walk

  Very good dogs discover 65 million-year-old fossil skeleton while out for a walk When 54-year-old Jon Gopsill took his two dogs out for a stroll on a beach in Stolford, Somerset in the UK, he never could have anticipated what they'd stumble across. As The Telegraph reports, Gopsill’s two pups, Poppy and Sam, were with him for a trip to the beach. Gopsill was casually walking while his dogs played, and that’s when the trio discovered what is now believed to be a 65-million-year-old skeleton of a long-dead sea creature.

Everything about the mysterious giant squid Architeuthis dux is massive. It grows as big as a school bus, has eyes the size of dinner plates, and The legendary source of sea-lore has frightened humans for ages, but how did they get so enormous in the first place? New research may soon offer

“Having this giant squid genome is an important node in helping us understand what makes a Giant squids also have large brains, which we can only assume are as complex as those seen in other cephalopods. How Scientists Filmed a Giant Squid in North American Waters for the First Time .

Protocadherins are thought to be important in wiring up a complicated brain correctly. 

a small boat in a body of water: Artist's impression of the kraken sea monster, which was likely inspired by the giant squid © Provided by Daily Mail Artist's impression of the kraken sea monster, which was likely inspired by the giant squid

The team were surprised to find more than 100 protocadherins in the octopus genome.

‘That seemed like a smoking gun to how you make a complicated brain,’ she said. ‘And we have found a similar expansion of protocadherins in the giant squid, as well.’

But how did the creature get so big? It’s a question that requires further probing of its genome, according to the team. 

But they have ruled out one possible option: whole genome duplication – an evolution strategy adopted millions of years ago for species to increase their size. 

The giant squid genome revealed only single copies of important developmental genes used in genome duplication – called Hox and Wnt – that are present in almost all animals. 

The lack of these two developmental genes suggested to the team that the gigantic invertebrate didn’t use whole genome duplication to increase its size as it evolved, but something else. 

Fast genomic sequencing can help stop spread of a virus

  Fast genomic sequencing can help stop spread of a virus As a novel coronavirus began spreading from Wuhan, China, scientists from across the country collaborated to isolate, sequence and publish the complete genetic code of the virus — just a month after the first documented case.Highly infectious viruses can spread across the world quickly, but our ability to sequence their genome and get a clear diagnosis has historically lagged behind, sometimes taking years. But that’s no longer the case.

Giant squid are rarely sighted and have never been caught and kept alive, meaning their biology (even how they reproduce) is still largely a mystery . Led by Rute da Fonseca at University of Copenhagen, the team discovered that the giant squid genome is big: with an estimated 2.7 billion DNA base

The giant squid ' s scientific mysteries have puzzled humans for centuries. Beyond the lore of the monstrous “A genome is a first step for answering a lot of questions about the biology of these very weird For example, we now know that the giant squid has about 2.7 billion DNA base pairs in its

The giant squid has long been a subject of horror lore. In this original illustration from Jules Verne's '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea,' the squid grasps a helpless sailor © Provided by Daily Mail The giant squid has long been a subject of horror lore. In this original illustration from Jules Verne's '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea,' the squid grasps a helpless sailor

Albertin also analysed a gene family that has so far been unique to cephalopods, called reflectins, which encode a protein that’s involved in making iridescence – the stunning ability to change colour when viewed from different angles.

‘Colour is an important part of camouflage, so we are trying to understand what this gene family is doing and how it works,’ Albertin said.

Giant squid are rarely sighted and have never been caught and kept alive, meaning details of their biological make-up have remained a mystery.

‘Having this giant squid genome is an important node in helping us understand what makes a cephalopod a cephalopod,' Albertin said

‘And it also can help us understand how new and novel genes arise in evolution and development.’

The giant squid of the Architeuthis genus was first described by researchers in 1857.

Despite having distribution spanning the whole of the ocean’s globe, except in the high Arctic and Antarctic waters, the creature is notoriously elusive, although it was captured in US waters for the first time last year.

The new study, led by a team at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, has been published in the journal GigaScience.

WHAT IS THE GIANT SQUID? 

Giant squid are thought to live all throughout the world’s oceans, though not so much in the tropical and polar areas, according to Smithsonian.

They live deep beneath the surface in ‘inky black, icy cold waters’ 1,650 feet (500 meters) to 3,300 feet (1,000 meters) deep.

And, they’re extremely elusive.

Until 2006, a giant squid had never been filmed alive, and much about what’s known of them is based on carcasses that have washed ashore.

The largest ever recorded, including the tentacles sits at a staggering 43 feet (13 meters), and scientists suspect the creatures may grow as large as 66 feet (20 meters) long.

Their eyes are the size of dinner plates, each at about 1 foot (30 centimeters) wide.

 Read more

Scientists Find The First-Ever Animal That Doesn't Need Oxygen to Survive .
Some truths about the Universe and our experience in it seem immutable. Scientists have just discovered that a jellyfish-like parasite doesn't have a mitochondrial genome - the first multicellular organism known to have this absence. That means it doesn't breathe; in fact, it lives its life completely free of oxygen dependency.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!