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Weird News Jellyfish hurl venom 'grenades' to snare prey

15:50  14 february  2020
15:50  14 february  2020 Source:   msn.com

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A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water", researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles. The Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish , found in shallow waters around Florida

The species of jellyfish known as the Cassiopea xamachana hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water." The jellyfish , found in the shallow waters around Florida, the Caribbean and Micronesia, is a frequent nuisance to snorkelers and surfers who appear to get stung

a close up of an animal: The Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish, found in shallow waters around Florida, the Caribbean and Micronesia, is a frequent nuisance to snorkelers and surfers who appear to get stung without touching the creatures © CHERYL AMES The Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish, found in shallow waters around Florida, the Caribbean and Micronesia, is a frequent nuisance to snorkelers and surfers who appear to get stung without touching the creatures

A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water", researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles.

The Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish, found in shallow waters around Florida, the Caribbean and Micronesia, is a frequent nuisance to snorkelers and surfers who appear to get stung without touching the creatures.

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A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water", researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing The Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish , found in shallow waters around Florida, the Caribbean and Micronesia, is a frequent nuisance to snorkelers

A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create 'stinging water,' researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles.

While the venom is not strong enough to pose a serious risk to humans, it does destroy skin cells and is deadly to smaller organisms © ALLEN COLLINS While the venom is not strong enough to pose a serious risk to humans, it does destroy skin cells and is deadly to smaller organisms

It was thought that the stings came from detached tentacles or younger specimens. 

But a team from the US Naval Research Laboratory realised that Cassiopea had in fact evolved a novel way of hunting without tentacles. 

The creatures lay on their backs and lob globules of venom-enriched mucus into the water overhead. 

These structures, called cassiosomes, can kill prey and are the likely cause of 'stinging water,' a phenomenon experienced by snorkelers and fishermen in tropical waters.

The team analysed the cassiosomes and found their outer layer to be coated with thousands of stinging cells.

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A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water", researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing These structures, called cassiosomes, can kill prey and are the likely cause of ‘stinging water,’ a phenomenon experienced by snorkelers and

A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water", researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles. The upside down jellyfish (Cassiopea xamachana), found in shallow waters around Florida

While the venom is not strong enough to pose a serious risk to humans, it does destroy skin cells and is deadly to smaller organisms. 

According to Cheryl Ames, from Japan's Tohoku University Graduate School of Agricultural Science, the stinging water "causes a sensation that is itchy-to-burning and, depending on the person, can cause enough discomfort to make them to want to get out of the water."

She said the findings of the study, published in Nature Communications Biology, could help tourists, divers and even aquarium staff to avoid discomfort in future. 

Ames told AFP that the world of science has much else to learn from jellyfish. 

"They have complex and coordinated behaviour with image-forming lens eyes, and some can even kill humans in minutes," she told AFP. 

"Much is to be learned about them and the applications to biotechnology."

These jellyfish can sting without touching you, thanks to 'mucus grenades' .
Cassiopea jellyfish make up for their lack of tentacles by releasing gooey clouds full of autopiloted stingers.Swim through the mangrove forest waters of the world, from the coasts of Florida to Micronesia, and you may encounter a jellyfish that stings despite having no tentacles. In fact, you needn’t even touch these jellies to get zapped.

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