•   
  •   

Weird News Archaeologists in Turkey Have Uncovered a Mysterious Ancient Kingdom Lost in History

11:06  29 june  2020
11:06  29 june  2020 Source:   sciencealert.com

Ancient Middle East clay tablets seized at Heathrow are 'fakes', British Museum says

  Ancient Middle East clay tablets seized at Heathrow are 'fakes', British Museum says Cache of 190 forgeries found in metal trunks will go on display as teaching aids at the British MuseumNearly 200 clay tablets, preserved in perfect condition, which apparently displayed the entire history of ancient Mesopotamian writing.

Last year, archaeologists were investigating an ancient mound site in central Turkey called Türkmen-Karahöyük. The greater region, the Konya Plain, abounds with lost metropolises, but even so, researchers couldn't have been prepared for what they were about to find. A local farmer told the

A farmer led archaeologists to an ancient stone, which told the tale of a As it turns out, the stele is a link to a lost ancient kingdom that may have defeated Midas, King of Phrygia, who was a The stone tells one of the most familiar tales in human history : a king successfully defeats a rival kingdom and

It was said that all he touched turned to gold. But destiny eventually caught up with the legendary King Midas, and a long-lost chronicle of his ancient downfall appears to have literally surfaced in Turkey.

Last year, archaeologists were investigating an ancient mound site in central Turkey called Türkmen-Karahöyük. The greater region, the Konya Plain, abounds with lost metropolises, but even so, researchers couldn't have been prepared for what they were about to find.

Hadrian's Wall in England is ideal for hiking

 Hadrian's Wall in England is ideal for hiking Roman emperor with seven letters? That should be easy for English schoolchildren: Hadrian is extremely popular, at least in Northern England. © Photo: Andreas Heimann / dpa-tmn Traces of history: There were watchtowers at Hadrian's Wall at regular intervals, the foundations of which can often still be seen. This is due to the wall he had built in the 2nd century AD, around 120 kilometers from Bowness-on-Solway in the west to Newcastle upon Tyne in the east.

Last year, archaeologists were investigating an ancient mound site in central Turkey called Türkmen-Karahöyük. The greater region, the Konya Plain, abounds with lost metropolises, but even so, researchers couldn’t have been prepared for what they were about to find. A local farmer told the

The as-yet-unnamed ancient kingdom was found after a farmer discovered a huge stone containing a message from an ancient king in an irrigation ditch. A mysterious stone with strange inscriptions has led to the discovery of a lost ancient kingdom in Turkey – which may have battled Phrygia, a

A local farmer told the group that a nearby canal, recently dredged, revealed the existence of a large strange stone, marked with some kind of unknown inscription.

"We could see it still sticking out of the water, so we jumped right down into the canal – up to our waists wading around," said archaeologist James Osborne from the University of Chicago earlier this year.

"Right away it was clear it was ancient, and we recognised the script it was written in: Luwian, the language used in the Bronze and Iron ages in the area."

With the aid of translators, the researchers found that the hieroglyphs on this ancient stone block – called a stele – boasted of a military victory. And not just any military victory, but the defeat of Phrygia, a kingdom of Anatolia that existed roughly 3,000 years ago.

Sinkhole opens near the Pantheon, revealing 2,000-year-old Roman paving stones

  Sinkhole opens near the Pantheon, revealing 2,000-year-old Roman paving stones A sinkhole that opened in front of the Pantheon in Rome has revealed 2,000-year-old stone pavers.The sinkhole, located in the Piazza della Rotonda, is almost 10 square feet (1 square meter) wide and just over 8 feet (2.5 m) deep. Inside the hole, archaeologists found seven ancient slabs made of travertine, a type of sedimentary rock.

The as-yet-unnamed ancient kingdom was found after a farmer discovered a huge stone containing a message from an ancient king in an irrigation ditch. A mysterious stone with strange inscriptions has led to the discovery of a lost ancient kingdom in Turkey – which may have battled Phrygia, a

Polish archaeologists have uncovered a long- lost city, in north-east Albania The Illyrian region was usually divided into several kingdoms who struggled for supremacy with each other. The Mayan civilization is one of the most mysterious and fascinating in history . There is much we still don’t

The royal house of Phrygia was ruled by a few different men called Midas, but dating of the stele, based on linguistic analysis, suggests the block's hieroglyphics could be referring to the King Midas – he of the famous 'golden touch' myth.

The stone markings also contained a special hieroglyphic symbolising that the victory message came from another king, a man called Hartapu. The hieroglyphs suggest Midas was captured by Hartapu's forces.

"The storm gods delivered the [opposing] kings to his majesty," the stone reads.

What's significant about this is that almost nothing is known about King Hartapu, nor about the kingdom he ruled. Nonetheless, the stele suggests the giant mound of Türkmen-Karahöyük may have been Hartapu's capital city, spanning some 300 acres in its heyday, the heart of the ancient conquest of Midas and Phrygia.

"We had no idea about this kingdom," Osborne said. "In a flash, we had profound new information on the Iron Age Middle East."

There's a lot more digging to be done in this ongoing archaeological project, and the findings so far should be considered preliminary for now. The international team is eager to revisit the site this year, to find out whatever more we can about this kingdom seemingly lost in history.

"Inside this mound are going to be palaces, monuments, houses," Osborne said. "This stele was a marvellous, incredibly lucky find - but it's just the beginning."

Floods hit northwest Turkey; 5 killed, 1 missing .
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Flash floods caused by torrential rains in northwest Turkey have left at least five people dead, officials said Monday. The floods hit the town of Kestel, in Bursa province, late Sunday, sweeping away five members of a family and trapping a woman with disabilities inside her home. By Monday morning, rescue workers found the body of the woman and recovered the bodies of four of the people washed away by the flood, the local governor's office said. A search was underway for one person who remains missing.The floods also washed away cars and farm vehicles and damaged farm lands around Kestel.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 6
This is interesting!