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Sport What was behind Ferrari-powered cars' smoking during F1 testing?

13:20  14 march  2018
13:20  14 march  2018 Source:   autosport.com

Lewis sets PB, Alonso breaks down

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► What was behind Ferrari - powered cars ' smoking during F 1 testing ? | by Automobiles ► The huge plumes of smoke being emitted by the Ferrari - powered cars was

The huge plumes of smoke being emitted by the Ferrari - powered cars was one of the more unusual elements of 2018 pre-season Formula 1 testing at Barcelona. What's behind Ricciardo's Renault switch? Ferrari still has 'a lot to unleash' - Vettel.

What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke? © LAT Images What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke?

The huge plumes of smoke being emitted by the Ferrari-powered cars was one of the more unusual elements of 2018 pre-season Formula 1 testing at Barcelona.

Rather than being a one-off occurrence, the sight of a cloud of smoke engulfing the Ferrari part of the pitlane just prior to its car emerging become commonplace - and was seen with customer teams Haas and Sauber too.

It left some in the paddock speculating that Ferrari might be deploying some form of engine trick.

But it appears the smoke was in fact a consequence of new F1 regulations brought in this year to clamp down on 'oil burn', something that Ferrari was believed to be particularly active in last year.

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I could have chosen one of the others cars but during my 2-days stay in Barcelona I found some curious and strange things being tested /used by Ferrari. It's characteristic of all Ferrari powered cars (Ferrari, Haas and Sauber) and it's that soft and subtle cloud of smoke /vapor you can see

Ferrari got a smoking issue on ther car in testing day 7 in barcelona under afternoon and mclaren Formula 1 vs All Others - F/A 18 Hornet, Ferrari , V8 Supercar, Super Bike, Rugby, Power Boat F 1 2018 Barcelona Testing Day 8 - Mclaren Dropped Car During Pit stop + Crash - Afternoon Highlights

As well as new requirements to help the FIA monitor the amount of oil that teams are burning, other tweaks to the rules have been introduced regarding the piping of oil vapour from catch tanks.

Previously it had been possible - through the use of active control valves - to feed this vapour back into the car's airbox, where it could then be sent into the engine and burned for a power boost.

Two new 2018 rules now prohibit such behaviour and force teams to feed out any excess oil vapour from the back of the car.

Article 5.1.12 of F1's technical regulations states: "All power unit breather fluids may only vent to atmosphere and must pass through an orifice which is positioned rearward of the rear axle centre line and less than 400mm above the reference plane and less than 100mm from the car centre plane. No breather fluids may re-enter the power unit."

Vettel buoyed by Ferrari's 'rock solid' reliability

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The huge plumes of smoke being emitted by the Ferrari - powered cars was one of the more unusual elements of 2018 pre-season Formula 1 testing at Barcelona. NextAnalysis: What was behind the smoking Ferraris in Barcelona.

There was an unusual phenomenon during winter testing - the smoking Ferrari SF71-H. This suggests teams were doing that previously which could have given them a power boost - but anyway, what is unusual, is that these Ferrari -engined cars are spewing out more oil than Renault or

Article 7.8 adds: "The use of active control valves between any part of the PU and the engine intake air is forbidden."

What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke? © LAT Images What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke?

These rules have prompted teams to fit piping to feed oil vapour out of the backs of their cars, which was causing the smoke in testing.

What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke? © LAT Images What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke?

Ferrari has elected to pipe its vapour through a channel built into the lower part of its crash structure casing.

This, paired with what appears to be much more oil vapour being dispensed by the engine than other teams, resulted in the distinctive vapour trail.

The very cold conditions increased the visibility of the warm oil vapour too, and on track it would have been exaggerated by air flowing around the crash structure and through the diffuser.

What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke? © LAT Images What was behind Ferrari's testing smoke?

Other teams opted to place their pipework either alongside their exhaust, most likely following recommendations from their engine suppliers, or to have it venting to the atmosphere from other locations.

Hamilton welcomes Ferrari surge

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One of the more curious aspects of pre-season Formula 1 testing revolved around the Ferrari - powered teams, and the huge plumes of smoke being pumped out of their cars .

What was behind Ferrari - powered cars ' smoking during F 1 testing ? | by Automobiles ▻ The huge plumes of smoke being emitted by the Ferrari - powered cars

It is not yet clear whether the smoking characteristic has caused any concern for Ferrari or if the design will be tweaked ahead of the Australian Grand Prix.

Although the smoke looked dramatic, the FIA does not feel it need to interfere because it is not appearing on the circuit.

F1 race director Charlie Whiting suggested the characteristic was similar to what happened with Toro Rosso on occasion last year on the grid.

"We see it quite often, we saw it a lot with the Toro Rosso last year whenever they fired up," Whiting told Autosport.

"We think that's just oil getting into the turbo through the seals. It's not doing it on the track."

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F1 2018 Preview: Can Sauber drop its perennial backmarker status? .
It can sometimes feel that the stand-out feature of Sauber is quite how forgettable it can be. Without the resourcefulness of Force India, the world champion production line of Toro Rosso or the flashes of brilliance of Williams, Sauber all too often fades into the background. In recent years it’s been its financial problems that have made the headlines rather than its on-track success. In the team’s 24-year history its achieved only 10 podiums, the latest of which was way back in 2012. But maybe that’s all about to change. An increased relationship with Ferrari fuels hopes for improvement. For 2018 Sauber has secured the most anticipated up-and-coming talent since Max Verstappen burst onto the scene. Ferrari junior Charles Leclerc conquered GP3 in 2016 in his debut season and went on to do the same in Formula 2 last year. There’s an air of expectation surrounding the 20-year-old and real excitement about what he could do. On the other side of the garage, Marcus Ericsson has been retained by the team for a fourth season, providing experience and continuity, if not tremendous pace, for the team. There is also hope that Leclerc might have machinery somewhat worthy of his talent. The 2018 challenger is quite different aerodynamically from its predecessor and the team is optimistic that they can improve compared to its 2017 performance. Also for the new season Sauber will be using the same engines as Ferrari, rather than the year-old ones they ran in 2017.

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