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Sport Why it’s so hard to stomach football clubs furloughing staff wages

14:21  01 april  2020
14:21  01 april  2020 Source:   fourfourtwo.com

Redknapp: PL has to help smaller clubs financially

  Redknapp: PL has to help smaller clubs financially Jamie Redknapp has called on the Premier League to help those lower down the football pyramid deal with the financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic. The plea comes as concerns grow for the futures of lower-league clubs who have had the revenue streams cut off by the unprecedented Covid-19 outbreak.Barnet to lay-off entire non-playing staff / Euro leagues keen on June 30 finish © Getty The British government has pledged £330billion to help small British businesses deal with the crisis, support clubs in the lower divisions of English football are eligible for.

It is safe to say that when the Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced the government’s job retention scheme during this coronavirus pandemic But how is that helped if clubs are furloughing staff who then cannot work? Comment: It ' s not just Premier League footballers whose wages look intolerable.

It means that the government will pay 80% of staff wages while the club will pay the remainder. A Norwich statement read: 'Owing to the impact of the current COVID-19 pandemic, Norwich City Football Club will begin the process of furloughing members of its staff who are unable to work at

a large stadium © Provided by FourFourTwo

We’re living in uncertain times. When aren’t we? But right now – these times especially – are particularly uncertain. 

Because throughout history, football has rarely stopped completely. Our great-great-grandfathers devised the game’s calendar that we still set our watch to, and it’s never stopped during peacetime. Not through recession or depression. Not through political upheaval. High profile tragedies and bad weather have only ever postponed games to foreseeable dates.

Whether money’s been tight or the future looked bleak, football has always been there as a comfort to all of us. Now, along with lives and livelihoods, coronavirus has even robbed the distraction of the football from us - “the most important of the least important things in life”, as Arrigo Sacchi once described the beautiful game.

Barcelona's quarantined stars 'at war with the club's board' after REFUSING their plea to take a 70 per cent wage cut, as coronavirus decimates the season in a country where over 4,000 have now died

  Barcelona's quarantined stars 'at war with the club's board' after REFUSING their plea to take a 70 per cent wage cut, as coronavirus decimates the season in a country where over 4,000 have now died A number of clubs across Europe have been forced to dramatically cut the wages of their players owing to financial difficulties caused by the spread of the deadly disease.  According to AS, Barcelona president Josep Maria Bartomeu is looking to strike a deal with his star players over a reduced salary. Spanish football clubs have been asked to enter a Temporary Employment Regulation File (ERTE) to guarantee their economic futures.Read more: All you need to know about the coronavirus outbreakThe standard wage cut rate is 70%, although Barcelona's players have reportedly baulked at that proposal.

Football clubs rarely pass away into total, terminal, permanent death. Many face the reading of their last rites. Many leave their fans worrying about the wisdom of branding themselves with a permanent “till I die” tattoo.

Why Is It So Hard To Succeed? Success is tough no matter how you slice it . With so many people vying and competing in what many label as a zero-sum However, below, I’ve outlined 5 of the most common things that seem to set us back in life. When we fail to address these things, we find it hard

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With the world starting to adapt to pandemic life, Tottenham Hotspur, Newcastle United and now Norwich City have announced that they will furlough staff wages, not including players or coaches. Essentially, furloughing means the government paying up to 80% of an employee's normal wages if a company is struggling during these testing times. 

Coronavirus: It sticks in the throat - MPs point finger at footballers over salaries

  Coronavirus: It sticks in the throat - MPs point finger at footballers over salaries MP Julian Knight says it "sticks in the throat" that footballers are earning huge salaries while non-playing staff are hit in the pocket.Tottenham, Newcastle United and Norwich City are among the clubs to have used the UK Government's furlough scheme for non-playing staff.

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It ' s unbelievable that somebody lives in conditions like that.' The man's landlord said his tenant used to be active and she hadn't noticed his appalling condition because he'd been hiding himself under a blanket whenever she stopped by. Fire-crews carried the man out of the house and he was rushed to

    “We have seen some of the biggest clubs in the world such as Barcelona, Bayern Munich and Juventus take steps to reduce their costs,” Spurs chairman Daniel Levy said in a statement.

    “Yesterday, having already taken steps to reduce costs, we ourselves made the difficult decision – in order to protect jobs – to reduce the remuneration of all 550 non-playing directors and employees for April and May by 20% utilising, where appropriate, the government’s furlough scheme. We shall continue to review this position.”

    This is not uncommon. From airlines to offices, employers are having to do what they can to survive. That’s business, unfortunately. It feels so much more uneasy, however, when a Premier League football club is relying on government handouts. 

    Footballers’ wages are under a constant microscope, even more so in times of dire poverty elsewhere in our country. The comparison with soldiers is a popular one; these days, NHS staff make for a starker contrast. Playing staff aside, Daniel Levy himself earns a reported £4m a year. Newcastle owner Mike Ashley is worth an estimated £2.5bn.

    OLIVER HOLT: Bullying, patronising and begging... Don't blame the players, blame greedy Premier League owners and chief executives for the state football finds itself in amid the coronavirus pandemic

      OLIVER HOLT: Bullying, patronising and begging... Don't blame the players, blame greedy Premier League owners and chief executives for the state football finds itself in amid the coronavirus pandemic OLIVER HOLT: And so, after all the years of taking, when the nation was plunged into a crisis and football's rainy day came, Premier League's billionaire owners had a simple message for us.And as they delivered it, they asked everyone else to recompense them for what they had squandered.

    No it ' s not hard to get jobs, it ' s hard to get good jobs. . I've been employed ever since I was 12. If your willing to sacrifice your ego, freedom, and sense of self value it ’ s fairly simple. Talk respectfully, have good manners, and dress properly, then go to every establishment nearby and start asking for jobs.

    It ' s through her stomach ! Feed your partner well and 'she'll be more interested in romance'. It found that they were much more interested in romance on a full stomach than when they hadn’t eaten. Brain scans carried out while the women viewed a variety of images showed that the women were

    So what? Whether footballers, their bosses or their bosses’ bosses deserve their weekly wage is a discussion for another time. In today’s society, it’s understandable for football clubs to conduct themselves as businesses. They turn over huge sums of money, after all - and no, these extortionate amounts of money in football are not a wholly good or bad thing.

    Watch: Stendel waives wages during lockdown (Sky Sports)

    The issue with furloughing staff, however, comes from a very different place. 

    Football clubs were built by communities. The game isn’t owned by FIFA, it’s owned by everyone. It doesn’t mean anything unless it’s shared - by your family, your siblings, your friends, your neighbours or just the strangers sat next to you at 3pm on a Saturday. 

    For five generations, football has been a comfort and a distraction to everyday life. Football is not a mirror to society: it's meant to be better than that.

    Liverpool reverses plan to furlough staff after backlash

      Liverpool reverses plan to furlough staff after backlash Liverpool reverses plan to furlough staff after backlashUnder the scheme implemented to help businesses survive the national lockdown, staff can be put on furlough and receive 80% of their salaries from the government, up to a maximum of 2,500 pounds ($3,000) a month.

    But it ’ s hard to get people to willingly spend a beautiful day watching bad football and it ’ s even harder to get them to show up on a cold, wintry This large staff is made possible by Alabama’s institutional support for football mentioned earlier. Many other College Football programs have great coaches too

    Her male counterparts reacted angrily, forcing mother and son to leave, a display so common that Japanese even have a name for it : matahara, or maternity harassment. “I wanted to represent all of the parents who are struggling to raise children in Japan,” Ogata wrote later in a column for The Guardian

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    a football player on a field: Best ways sports stars and teams have entertained fans during isolation

    And most importantly, football is, and always has been, the glue that held communities together. That’s been recognised by some clubs this past few weeks. Carlo Ancelotti phoned an Everton fan and discussed with him the best shows to watch on Netflix. After Aston Villa had their match against Chelsea postponed, the club donated the supplies and meals that were gathered and prepared for the fixture to charities. Both Manchester City and United have combined to donate money together.

    Community stretches further than city walls these days, too. Countless clubs have put on their own “watch parties” of classic games for fans to get involved with, wherever they are, to feel - at least - like they’re a part of something even with no football going on.

    When troubling things happen to us, we turn to our football clubs. And our football clubs encourage us to do so. They ask us to be part of a hashtag, to wear their colours, to reach out to them through hard times. They built bigger, better stadiums to accommodate more of us. They ask for our support. So where’s theirs?

    We’ve all come to accept that football is a big-money business. It can be difficult to accept that these businesses are not relying on the wealth of their very public owners, but on the state to foot the wage bill. 

    No business would be anything with its staff or its consumers - that’s rule number one. But given how much football clubs pander to us, it’s a little harder to stomach furloughing from them.

    While you're here, why not take advantage of our brilliant new subscribers' offer? Get 5 copies of the world's greatest football magazine for just £5 – the game's greatest stories and finest journalism direct to your door for less than the cost of a London pint. Cheers!

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    For Dugarry, the players are the stuffing turkeys .
    © Provided by Sports.fr Christian Dugarry. While the LFP and the UNFP agreed on the basis of an overall drop in player salaries, Christophe Dugarry stepped up to denounce the constant stigmatization of footballers. The Professional Football League (LFP) and the national union of professional footballers, UNFP, have found an agreement validated by the Ministry of Economy and Finance to cut the wages of players who are otherwise unemployed partial.

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