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Sport Q&A with Seinfeld's Soup Nazi: On the Mets, cell phones and the show

22:10  19 july  2016
22:10  19 july  2016 Source:   sportingnews.com

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Thomas’ Soup Nazi is a big draw for minor league baseball games, charity golf tournaments and all sorts of commercials across the country. He was in Charlotte, N.C., on Monday for a Seinfeld night at the Knights game (they’re the Triple-A affiliate of the White Sox) and I spent a little time chatting with him before the SPORTING NEWS: Baseball was obviously a big part of " Seinfeld ," through the whole run of the show . Do you have any favorite baseball moments? THOMAS: Like everybody else, I just loved that Keith Hernandez episode with the magic loogie, that tied it all in with JFK and everything.

Want to know what the Soup Nazi said exactly? Read the full scritpt of The Soup Nazi . Full Seinfeld scripts and episodes. WAYNE KNIGHT as Newman JERRY SEINFELD as Jerry. HEIDI SWEDBERG as Susan JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUSS as Elaine. ALEXANDRA WENTWORTH as Sheila JASON ALEXANDER as George.

Larry Thomas just might be the most memorable one-episode character in sitcom history.

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Thomas, of course, played The Soup Nazi in a Season 7 episode of Seinfeld. His “No soup for you!” line was brilliant — both in its creation and its delivery — and he became an instant fan favorite, to the point where he was brought back for the series finale a couple years later.

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Seinfeld is the only show I like with a laugh track. That said though, there are some moments that are a tad broad/mainstream. But soup nazi was gold, gold i tell ya. It' s a testament to the strength of the show that all the jokes land perfectly without the laugh track. Watched the whole video without feeling too weird (beyond the obviously strained mixing from trying to drop the laughter out). With some weaker sitcoms (insert Big Bang Theory, Two and a Half Men, etc.), it' s pretty obvious that the laughter bolsters weak writing.

Seinfeld ’ s “ Soup Nazi ” is serving up some real talk when it comes to fighting Covid. Boomer Naturals says the protective cloth face mask is designed for comfort and suitable for all-day wear. The mask is fully machine-washable, and the company says the mask can be washed up to 30 times without losing effectiveness. For every order placed online, Boomer Naturals says it will donate a mask to a charitable organization supporting veterans, the homeless, health workers, nursing homes and children affected by the coronavirus.

Even now, almost two decades after the show ended (seriously how has it been almost 19 years?) Thomas’ Soup Nazi is a big draw for minor-league baseball games, charity golf tournaments and all sorts of commercials across the country.

He was in Charlotte on Monday for a Seinfeld night at the Knights game (they’re the Triple-A affiliate of the White Sox) and I spent a little time chatting with him before the contest.

SN: Baseball was obviously a big part of Seinfeld, through the whole run of the show. Do you have any favorite baseball moments?

THOMAS: Like everybody else, I just loved that Keith Hernandez episode with the magic loogie, that tied it all in with JFK and everything. That was their brilliance. That was loads of fun. And I got to meet Keith at the finale, we were both in the finale.

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"The Soup " is the 93rd episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld . This was the seventh episode of the sixth season. It aired on November 10, 1994. The character Kenny Bania (played by Stephen Hytner) made his first appearance in the episode

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SN: Nice. Was he like he was on the show?

THOMAS: Yeah. He’s a really nice guy. I did have something to say to him. I was living in Queens when the Mets were created, so I told him, “I was there when you guys were made.”

  Q&A with Seinfeld's Soup Nazi: On the Mets, cell phones and the show © Provided by Sporting News

Larry Thomas poses with Joe Marx, the Charlotte Knights' execute chef, before the game (Ryan Fagan/SN)

SN: That’s cool. Are you a Mets fan?

THOMAS: I am a Mets fan just because of that. I was a little kid, and living in Queens, they created the Mets, Shea Stadium and the Beatles played Shea Stadium, and then on top of that, it was the World’s Fair. That ruined my life because I thought life should always be that cool.

SN: How old were you?

THOMAS: I was 8 years old. After that, we moved to Roslyn Heights, on Long Island. Life was never again that cool. We used to sing the Mets song in school. "Meet the Mets" was right up there in our repertoire with "Blowing in the Wind" and "Born Free." We always sang "Meet the Mets."

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With Jerry Seinfeld , Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Michael Richards, Jason Alexander. A soup stand owner obsesses about his customers' ordering procedure, but his soup is so good that people line up down the block for it anyway. George tries to do the same thing with Susan to show how annoying they are to everybody. Jerry and his girlfriend get rejected from the Soup Nazi ' s kitchen when they're caught kissing in line. Elaine buys an Armoire and asks Kramer to watch it. While watching it, Kramer is robbed by some gay, trash-talking street toughs who want nothing more than the Armoire.

The Soup Nazi was based on Al Yeganeh, the real-life owner of Soup Kitchen International in Manhattan, New York City. After the episode aired, Jerry Seinfeld and members of the cast and crew went to the restaurant for lunch. Yeganeh yelled at them and stated that the publicity had ruined his reputation. Even the slightest reference to this show would push his buttons (it can be seen in an interview he did with CNN). So when some cast members and writers from this show bravely visited the restaurant after the episode aired, Yeganeh claimed that the show had ruined his life.

SN: So what do you remember about the Miracle Mets, when they won the World Series in ’69?

THOMAS: By that time I was living in L.A. But I loved hearing that they won. The Mets against the Yankees was always like David and Goliath in a way.

SN: Did you hate the Yankees?

THOMAS: No, not really. My mom and my grandfather were Yankees fans, even though she was born in Brooklyn, for some reason they’d travel all the way to the Bronx to see the Yankees rather than favor the Dodgers, so I had to be nice.

SN: So I’m curious. My friends and I always talk about how different Seinfeld episodes would be if cell phones were around back then. Do you think about that?

THOMAS: Yes. That’s what I always say to the kids, the 13-year-olds who tell me they love the show, “Doesn’t it bug you, though, that if they just had their cell phones that none of their problems would be problems? Or if they could Google something?” And the kids go, “No, that’s the fun of it. It’s retro. That’s the way life used to be.” So they’re getting a lesson on the way life used to be. … When you really think about it, how many of their problems could have been solved by cell phones? Remember George waiting for the pay phone in the Chinese restaurant? That whole frustrating thing.

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SN: Or the time they were trying to go to a movie, and had to keep leaving messages with the ticket person.

THOMAS: Right, right. If they had had cell phones, most of their problems would have been solved. There still would have been ways to get them in trouble, though, because of the way they treated life. They did not go about anything honestly, y’know?

  Q&A with Seinfeld's Soup Nazi: On the Mets, cell phones and the show © Provided by Sporting News

Larry Thomas signs an autograph at the Knights game. (Laura Wolff/Charlotte Knights)

SN: OK, so a long time ago, when I first started at SN, I interviewed Alyssa Milano and my editor made me promise to ask her, “Who’s the boss in baseball?” I was embarrassed but did it, and she gave a good answer, so I feel like I should ask you this: What baseball player would you want to tell, “No soup for you.”

THOMAS: (laughs) Gosh, I can’t even come up with that answer. There isn’t anybody I don’t like. Everyone in baseball gets soup.

SN: Excellent. How often do you get asked to personalize the “No soup for you!” line?

THOMAS: I’ll probably hopefully do it tonight a few hundred times. I’ve written it more than I’ve said it. At any given autograph show I’ll write it a couple hundred times.

SN: I know you do a lot of minor-league games and other events. I would imagine the baseball games have to be a favorite stop for you, though.

THOMAS: It is. It’s kind of the most fun of the things I do. Except for throwing out the first pitch. That’s sooo up to the gods. I just get on the mound and say, “Remember, actors are actors because they couldn’t play baseball. If we could have played baseball, we would have done that.”

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SN: Seems to me there’s a common theme. Seinfeld is such a part of American culture, and baseball is such a part of the culture. Do you see how those two mix together so well?

THOMAS: Yeah. And Seinfeld spent time on baseball, in the show. It just seems that all the baseball fans are Seinfeld fans. So Seinfeld nights at all the ballparks I’ve done, which is probably 12 or more by now, the Seinfeld nights always really work. Everybody loves it. For some reason, those two things seem to fit. You know, certain people have a certain sense of humor.

If you ever go to a real extreme sci-fi convention, that’s weird. Those are people who are totally unaware of humor in the world. Sometimes I’ll go do those shows, because they’ll offer me a table and a guarantee, and I’ll sit there and you get these guys coming by in Star Trek uniforms and they’ll look at the picture I have with me as the Soup Nazi on the table, and they’ll look at it like I have 15 heads, which would actually work on a sci-fi show. Then they’ll finally look up at me and go, “What one was that from?” And I’ll go, it wasn’t from an episode of Star Trek, it was from Seinfeld. And then they’ll spend another couple minutes looking like they’re smelling broccoli over-cooking in the next room, and they’ll look up at me and go, “I never liked that show,” and then they’ll walk away. And that whole thing takes like five excruciating minutes. But those are the only people I meet who really were unaware of the humor of Seinfeld.

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