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Tech & Science Google uses GPS and smart locks to secure wayward campus bikes

09:22  08 january  2018
09:22  08 january  2018 Source:   engadget.com

'Hey Goo Goo': This Italian grandmother's first interaction with Google Home is hilariously adorable

  'Hey Goo Goo': This Italian grandmother's first interaction with Google Home is hilariously adorable While voice-activated devices and smart assistants may have become commonplace for many, the technology can still be baffling and even frightening to some. Just after Christmas Day, YouTuber Ben Actis posted a video of his 85-year-old Italian grandmother's first interaction with the new Google Home Mini in Florida and the internet has already fallen in love with her."Hey, Goo Goo," the grandmother screams at the device perched on the table in a thick accent, trying to get its attention. Her family suggests that she try saying "Ok, Google" and ask it about the weather.

Google has been adding GPS trackers to its bikes as of late 2017, and has been testing smart locks that employees can open with their phones. Free-to-ride campus bikes might have sounded great in Google 's utopian early days, but that's at odds with a reality where people will routinely borrow or

Google has been adding GPS trackers to its bikes as of late 2017, and has been testing smart locks that employees can open with their phones. Free-to-ride campus bikes might have sounded great in Google 's utopian early days, but that's at odds with a reality where people will routinely borrow or.

a bicycle parked on a sidewalk © Provided by Engadget Google is well-known for offering free bikes on campus to help its employees get around, but those bikes frequently don't stay on campus. Up to 250 go missing per week -- and that's rather ironic for a company that built its reputation on finding information. At last, though, the search giant is putting technology to work to solve the problem. Google has been adding GPS trackers to its bikes as of late 2017, and has been testing smart locks that employees can open with their phones.

The company tells the Wall Street Journal that about a third of its bikes have GPS trackers so far, and they're offering insight into just how far the two-wheelers will go. While many tend to stay around Mountain View (some locals treat them like community rides), others have been taken as far as Alaska and Mexico.

'Hey Goo Goo': This Italian grandmother's first interaction with Google Home is hilariously adorable

  'Hey Goo Goo': This Italian grandmother's first interaction with Google Home is hilariously adorable While voice-activated devices and smart assistants may have become commonplace for many, the technology can still be baffling and even frightening to some. Just after Christmas Day, YouTuber Ben Actis posted a video of his 85-year-old Italian grandmother's first interaction with the new Google Home Mini in Florida and the internet has already fallen in love with her."Hey, Goo Goo," the grandmother screams at the device perched on the table in a thick accent, trying to get its attention. Her family suggests that she try saying "Ok, Google" and ask it about the weather.

Google is well-known for offering free bikes on campus to help its employees get around, but those bikes frequently don’t stay on campus . Up to 250 go missing per week — and that’s rather ironic for a company that built its reputation on finding inf… Source: Engadget – Google uses GPS and smart

Google Smart Lock lets you to get right down to work (or play) without needing to remember passwords and security codes. Works with your Android devices, Chromebooks, Chrome browser and select apps.

In many ways, the trackers and locks represent Google's ongoing loss of innocence. Free-to-ride campus bikes might have sounded great in Google's utopian early days, but that's at odds with a reality where people will routinely borrow or steal anything that isn't nailed down. Even though the company can easily afford to lose bikes, it doesn't look good to waste money and resources for the sake of maintaining a company tradition.

Wall Street Journal

CES showed us smart displays will be the new normal .
Before the start of CES 2018, the only real smart speakers with a display were the Amazon Echo Show and the Echo Spot. But now that Google has partnered with several manufacturers to make a whole line of Echo Show rivals, a bona fide new device category has been born: the smart display. The simple reason for this argument is that the display makes such devices much more useful. Sure, you could have Alexa or Google Assistant tell you there's a Starbucks 1.5 miles away from you. But wouldn't it be nice to actually see where it is on a map? Or if you wanted to know the time, you could just, you know, look at the screen.

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