•   
  •   

Tech & Science Editing Memories and Sensations in the Brain With Technology

02:39  03 may  2018
02:39  03 may  2018 Source:   newsweek.com

This Mutation Protects Mice From Alzheimer's Disease, Could it Work on Humans?

  This Mutation Protects Mice From Alzheimer's Disease, Could it Work on Humans? A similar mutation was found in a small popular of humans, and may have the same protective effect.In a new study, published May 4 in Nature Communications, researchers from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science in Japan used a gene editing tool called CRISPR technology to create mice that had a mutated version of an App gene, a gene associated with the buildup of amyloid-beta in the brain. Doctors have observed that amyloid-beta builds up in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients and can interfere with brain cell communication. The hope is that a mutated version of the gene would reduce this amyloid-beta plaque formation, a press release reported.

Memory Editing Technology Will Give Us Perfect Recall and - VICE - www.vice.com. When he stimulated one section, they saw shapes, colors, textures; another, and they felt sensations in various parts of the body. But the idea that stored memories exist as physical changes within the brain .

Memory Editing Technology Will Give Us Perfect Recall and - VICE - www.vice.com. When he stimulated one section, they saw shapes, colors, textures; another, and they felt sensations in various parts of the body. But the idea that stored memories exist as physical changes within the brain .

A view of an interactive display during a preview of © EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/GETTY IMAGES A view of an interactive display during a preview of "Brain: The inside story" exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Will we soon be able to edit memories in the brain? What if we had the ability to fool our brain into thinking that we’d experienced something that never happened?

While this may sound far-fetched, neuroscientists at the University of California- Berkeley are developing a technique that could do just that by manipulating electrical activity in the brain.

The technique is called holographic projection and it involves a piece of equipment known as a holographic brain modulator, which uses flashes of light to activate or suppress neurons — or nerve cells — in the brain in a way that mimics real patterns of brain activity. By doing this, you can trick the brain into thinking something it hasn’t felt or sensed before.

Scientists think we may be able to communicate telepathically soon

  Scientists think we may be able to communicate telepathically soon If you've ever watched the X-Men movies and wished you had the telepathic powers of Jean Grey or Professor X then you may be in luck. The brain surgeon Dr. Eric Leuthardt of Washington University is confident that in the future humans will be able to get brain implants which will allow them to share information with others.

A view of an interactive display during a preview of " Brain : The inside story" exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, November 16, 2010. What if we had the ability to fool our brain into thinking that we'd experienced something that never happened?

The technology is called a holographic brain modulator, and it uses holographic projections to activate or suppress individual neurons. The end goal is to control thousands of neurons at once in patterns that are based on real brain activity to replicate sensation .

Ultimately, the Berkeley team are aiming to be able to simulate patterns of actual brain responses by controlling thousands of neurons at once. This could have a number of useful applications.

For example, they hope that the technique could, one day, be used to control prosthetic limbs, enable paralyzed people to feel, touch or even allow the blind to see by converting the images from a camera lens into real brain activity.

“This has great potential for neural prostheses, since it has the precision needed for the brain to interpret the pattern of activation,” Alan Mardinly, an assistant professor of molecular and cell biology at Berkeley, said in a statement.

“If you can read and write the language of the brain, you can speak to it in its own language and it can interpret the message much better,” he said. “This is one of the first steps in a long road to develop a technology that could be a virtual brain implant with additional senses or enhanced senses.”

Facebook's Memories is a dedicated spot for nostalgia

  Facebook's Memories is a dedicated spot for nostalgia Facebook's On This Day and other nostalgia-driven posts are helpful for reminding you of moments from years past, but they eventually drift out of your News Feed. As you might expect, you can control which moments appear in Memories, so you don't have to relive the pain associated with an ex or the loss of a family member.

Your brain 's ability to collect, connect, and create mosaics from these milliseconds-long impressions is the basis of every memory . Every sensory experience triggers changes in the molecules of your neurons, reshaping the way they connect to one another.

The BrainWorks sensory diet I made has been quite effective with a new student who has autism. He has limited verbal expression so the pictures offer more It is nice to have that available when needed. I am using your information on data collection and sensory strategies to promote starting a Sensory

But it may also have more profound implications. Such an ability could pave the way for technologies that may enable us to replace painful emotions or insert memories into our minds of things that we never saw.

Mardinly and his colleagues are the authors of a new paper, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, describing the prototype holographic brain modulator and tests they conducted on mice.

The researchers used the modulator to shine pulses of light through areas of the rodents’ skulls where the beam could reach the brain. Each of these pulses — which were fired 300 times a second — activated up to 50 neurons at once in tiny sections of brain, each containing several thousand neurons.

Before exposing the mice to this light, the team administered the animals with a virus that altered the functioning of their neurons so that the nerve cells would activate when struck by a pulse of light.

The company that wants to freeze and upload your brain is now being shunned by MIT

  The company that wants to freeze and upload your brain is now being shunned by MIT MIT is breaking up with Nectome, the small biotech company seeking to one day freeze and preserve brains beyond death as a way of holding…MIT is breaking up with Nectome, the small biotech company seeking to one day freeze and preserve brains beyond death as a way of holding onto memories permanently.

The brain stores memories in two ways. In a brain scan, scientists see these different regions of the brain light up when someone is recalling an episode of memory , demonstrating how memories represent an index of these different recorded sensations and thoughts.

Loss of sensation in part of the body. Sensory or motor neglect – e.g. a person with right sided sensory Learning and memory . Associated cognitive disorders. The brain stem consists of a group of structures that lie Deep within the brain , including the Pons, medulla oblongata, and midbrain.

“The major advance is the ability to control neurons precisely in space and time,” said Nicolas Pégard, another author of the paper from Berkeley. “In other words, to shoot the very specific sets of neurons you want to activate and do it at the characteristic scale and the speed at which they normally work.”

The team tested the modulator on areas of the brain related to touch, vision and motor skills, as the mice walked on a treadmill with their heads immobilized. While they did not observe any behavioral changes in the mice, they did measure brain activity that was similar to that seen during normal sensory stimulation, indicating that the technique was having some effect.

The technology is still in its very early stages at the moment: It only works on a tiny section of the brain and the equipment required is large. However, the team hopes that they can scale-up the technique to affect larger areas of the brain — and therefore have a larger influence on behavior — as well as downsize the equipment to the point that it could fit in a backpack.

People are struggling to find the hidden lollipop in this colorful ice cream puzzle — can you spot it? .
Hungarian artist Gergely Dudás has challenged people to find a panda among snowmen, a card among gift bags, and a heart among elephants for Valentine's Day. In his works of art, he's challenged people to find a panda among snowmen, a card among gift bags, and a heart among elephants. He's also released a book of holiday brainteasers called "Bear's Merry Book of Hidden Things.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!