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Tech & ScienceApple says Qualcomm refused to sell it chips for the latest iPhones

11:06  15 january  2019
11:06  15 january  2019 Source:   msn.com

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Apple says it wanted to use Qualcomm modems in the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR — but that Qualcomm refused to sell them after Apple sued Qualcomm then countersued, saying that Apple was infringing on its patents and sharing information with Intel. As of October 2018, Qualcomm said

Qualcomm is still providing chips for the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus. But the chipmaker has allegedly refused to provide components for Apple ’s latest iPhones , since We were working toward doing that with Qualcomm , but in the end, they would not support us or sell us chips ,” Williams said .

Apple says Qualcomm refused to sell it chips for the latest iPhones © Photo by James Bareham / The Verge

Apple says it wanted to use Qualcomm modems in the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR — but that Qualcomm refused to sell them after Apple sued over its licensing practices. “In the end they would not support us or sell us chips,” Apple’s chief operating officer Jeff Williams revealed today during his testimony to the US Federal Trade Commission, as spotted by CNET. Apple had to use Intel’s LTE chips instead.

Qualcomm is currently on trial, accused of engaging in monopolistic practices including charging unusually high royalty rates, refusing to license patents to other chipmakers, and promising deals to customers like Apple if they exclusively used Qualcomm chips.

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Apple says it wanted to use Qualcomm modems in the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR — but that Qualcomm refused to sell them after Apple sued Qualcomm then countersued, saying that Apple was infringing on its patents and sharing information with Intel. As of October 2018, Qualcomm said

Qualcomm continues to provide Apple with chips for its older iPhones , including the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, Apple COO Jeff Williams testified Monday during He said he contacted Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf to get him to sell chips to Apple . When Qualcomm refused , Apple had to call Intel's

While it originally appeared that Apple had shifted to exclusively using Intel modems out of some combination of spite and competitive reasons, Apple said in the courtroom that wasn’t the case. According to Williams, Apple originally planned to split its latest modem order between Qualcomm and Intel. It only turned to Intel to supply all the modems after Qualcomm refused to sell.

The dependency on Intel could also hurt Apple’s chances of bringing a 5G iPhone quickly to market, as Intel’s 5G chips aren’t expected until 2020. Intel’s LTE modems are known to be slower than Qualcomm’s, too. Back when Apple was sourcing both Qualcomm and Intel modems for its phones at the same time, the company had to cap the speeds on Qualcomm modems so that one iPhone wouldn’t have faster speeds than another.

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Apple says that Qualcomm refused to sell the company modems for use in its new iPhone XS and iPhone XR citing the licensing dispute between the They highlighted the same 'no license, no chips ' policy which Apple sued the company over. Qualcomm refuses to sell its chips to customers unless

As Apple and Qualcomm ’s FTC trial continues today, we’ re learning more details about the quarrels between the two companies. As reported by CNET, one of the more interesting tidbits from Apple ’s COO Jeff Williams was that the company wanted to put Qualcomm ’s 4G chips in the iPhone XS

Apple also revealed the price it’s been paying for Qualcomm modems: $7.50 per device, says Williams. That’s apparently five times more than what Apple wanted to pay — just $1.50 per device. Still, Williams said, “We needed their chip supply. If we tried to pursue them legally, we wouldn’t have access to the chips. We didn’t have a lot of options.”

The conflict started in 2017 when Apple sued Qualcomm for unfair licensing terms. Qualcomm then countersued, saying that Apple was infringing on its patents and sharing information with Intel. As of October 2018, Qualcomm said that Apple owes it $7 billion in royalty payments. Since then, Qualcomm has taken the fight to international courts in Germany and China, successfully winning bans on older iPhones being sold in either country. Apple had to pull iPhone 7 and iPhone 8 models in Germany and issue a software update to iPhones in China to circumvent a ban on most iPhones except the latest ones.

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