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Tech & ScienceQualcomm, Apple make closing arguments in patent trial

07:51  14 march  2019
07:51  14 march  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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In closing arguments , Qualcomm zeroed in on the boot-up patent . Apple has argued that its former engineer, Arjuna Siva, co-invented the technology when he was working for the iPhone maker. But Qualcomm counsel David Nelson pointed out on Wednesday that Siva testified he wasn't "claiming to

Apple and Qualcomm presented closing arguments today as part of their patent infringement As a quick refresher, the trial centers on three patents , which Qualcomm alleges Apple infringed upon In closing remarks, Qualcomm counsel David Nelson made sure to note that Siva said he doesn’t

Qualcomm, Apple make closing arguments in patent trial © Richard Nieva/CNET

Qualcomm, based in San Diego, Calif., is one of the world's biggest mobile chipmakers.

Qualcomm and Apple on Wednesday wrapped up arguments in a contentious patent infringement trial in San Diego.

The trial, just the latest skirmish in a long-standing legal feud between the two companies, centers on three Qualcomm technology patents that Qualcomm alleges Apple used without permission on some versions of the iPhone.

One patent allows a smartphone to quickly connect to the internet once the device is booted up. Another deals with graphics processing and battery life. The third lets apps on your phone download data more easily by directing traffic between the apps processor and the modem.

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San Diego and Cupertino, California — Qualcomm and Apple today announced an agreement to dismiss all litigation between the two companies worldwide. Qualcomm invents breakthrough technologies that transform how the world connects, computes and communicates.

Qualcomm and the FTC have made closing arguments in their antitrust trial , and we're awaiting a ruling from U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh. The same German court that granted an injunction which stopped Apple from selling the iPhone 7 and 8 in that country has dismissed four other patent claims

In closing arguments, Qualcomm zeroed in on the boot-up patent. Apple has argued that its former engineer, Arjuna Siva, co-invented the technology when he was working for the iPhone maker. But Qualcomm counsel David Nelson pointed out on Wednesday that Siva testified he wasn't "claiming to be an inventor." Siva also said he hadn't read the language of the patent.

"What were they trying to hide?" Nelson said in his closing remarks, referring to Apple's defense. "Why not show him those things?"

In Apple's closing remarks, its counsel, Juanita Brooks, opened with a broader argument: that the lawsuit isn't about patents at all. She said the "real motivation" for the complaint is that Qualcomm was upset Apple started to also use Intel chips in iPhones in 2016, after Apple and Qualcomm had previously had an exclusive relationship since 2011.

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Qualcomm Incorporated (NASDAQ: QCOM) today provided the following statement around the FTC trial ’s closing argument All real-world evidence presented at trial showed how Qualcomm ’s years of R&D and innovation fostered competition, and growth for the entire mobile economy to the benefit

Apple and Qualcomm agreed to dismiss all litigation world-wide over patent royalties, on the day the two sides began a courtroom trial to settle their legal dispute. The settlement, which came hours after opening arguments in a trial between the companies started, includes an undisclosed payment from

This case started when we started using Intel as a second source ... Qualcomm went into a drawer, dusted off some old patents, and threw them against the wall to see if they'd stick.

"This case started when we started using Intel as a second source," she said. "Qualcomm went into a drawer, dusted off some old patents, and threw them against the wall to see if they'd stick."

She said Qualcomm was supplying chips to the rest of the mobile industry during that time. "We ... should also be able to date somebody else," Brooks said.

In his rebuttal, Nelson denied the claim. "It doesn't have anything to do with that," he said, adding, "We're entitled to get return on our intellectual property."

The patent dispute is just the latest in a wide-ranging legal saga. Two years ago, the Federal Trade Commission, aided by tech companies Apple and Intel, accused Qualcomm of operating a monopoly in modem chips. The FTC argued that Qualcomm's high royalty rates stopped competitors from entering the market, harming consumers. That trial took place in January, and the parties are currently waiting for a decision. The two companies will also meet in court next month, to argue over royalties.

Qualcomm is seeking $31 million in damages, or $1.40 per allegedly infringing iPhone. The damages are for iPhones sold from July 2017, when the lawsuit was filed, that contain chips from Intel. In 2016, Apple started using Intel modems in some models of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. Now Intel has replaced Qualcomm in iPhones altogether.

On Wednesday, Nelson argued in closing remarks that Apple didn't object to the damages request because the company didn't make any dispute in testimony. Apple said that's not true. "Let me be clear, we owe Qualcomm not one penny."

A jury of eight people will now decide on a verdict.

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