Tech & Science: Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

Tech & ScienceAstronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy

19:45  12 june  2019
19:45  12 june  2019 Source:   ibtimes.com

Astronomers discover universe's very first molecule in dying star

Astronomers discover universe's very first molecule in dying star Using NASA's SOFIA, scientists finally pin down the elusive ancient molecule in space for the first time.

Currently, astronomers believe that supermassive black holes sit at the center of every galaxy as massive as or larger than the Milky Way. Light echo measured from the central black hole in a dwarf galaxy NGC 4395. The time delay between the continuum from the black hole ’s accretion disk

Astronomers then measured the time taken by radiation to hit the broad-line region and cause these flashes. Doing this, they were able to quantify the To calculate the black hole mass, they also had to measure the intrinsic speed of the broad-line region, which is the speed at which the region cloud is

Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy © NASA/JPL-Caltech Bulgeless Galaxy Hides Black Hole A newly discovered black hole in a nearby dwarf galaxy could provide scientists a deeper understanding of how its larger counterparts were formed. According to researchers, the black hole’s small size makes it easier to measure and study than the larger ones.

The black hole was discovered at the center of the galaxy NGC 4395 by a team of researchers including astronomer Elena Gallo of the University of Michigan. The results of their study were published in the scientific journal Nature Astronomy.

Related slideshow: 30 photos to prove how beautiful our galaxy Milky Way is (Provided by Photo Services)

A New Tide of Gravitational Waves

A New Tide of Gravitational Waves When new cosmic ripples are detected, astronomers leap into action to try to locate their source.

Instead, astronomers measure the black holes ' "sphere of influence" - the gravitational effects they have on surrounding gas and stars. But for the 100 or so far more distant black holes whose masses have been estimated, astronomers have made average measurements of associated stars' speeds

Astronomers have spotted an enormous black hole - the second-heaviest ever seen - but it resides in a tiny galaxy . The galaxy NGC 1277, just a quarter the size of our Instead, astronomers measure the black holes ' "sphere of influence" - the gravitational effects they have on surrounding gas and stars.

Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Astronomers Measure Tiny Black Hole In Nearby Galaxy
Although scientist are already aware that black holes appear in the center of large galaxies such as the Milky Way, further studies are yet to be conducted on how they form in dwarf galaxies. Through the new study, researchers are hoping to get an idea of how massive black holes are formed by studying a smaller one.

In order achieve this, Gallo and her team first measured the size of the small black hole they discovered. Through reverberation mapping, they used the radiation emitted by an accretion disk around the black hole. The accretion disk is a mass of matter that was accumulated due to the gravitational pull of black holes.

As the radiation moves away from the accretion disk, it goes through a mass of material known as the broad-line region and causes flashes to appear. By measuring the time it took for the radiation to reach the broad-line region, the researchers were able to get an idea of the tiny black hole’s mass.

“The distance is thought to depend on the black hole mass,” Gallo said in a press release. “The larger the black hole, the larger the distance and the longer you expect for light to be emitted from the accretion disk to hit the broad-line region.”

Through their observations, the researchers concluded that the black hole has a mass 10,000 times that of the Sun.

Aside from applying the same technique to measure the mass of larger black holes, Gallo noted that the new study could be used in analyzing how black holes reach massive sizes.

“Black holes somehow shape the galaxy they live in on very large scales, and because we don’t know much about smaller galaxies with their smaller black holes, we don’t know whether that’s true all the way down,” Gallo said. “With this measurement, we can add more information to this relationship.”

Astronomers discover massive ring of gas circling our black hole.
The center of the Milky Way galaxy is somewhere you wouldn't want to be. We have it pretty easy here on Earth, orbiting our star and staying out of everyone's way, but deep within the heart of our galaxy, a monster lurks. It’s a supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (that’s pronounced “A star”, for the record) and while we can’t exactly see it, we know it’s there thanks to decades of scientific observations of our own galaxy as well as many others. The intense gravitational pull of the black hole draws in just about everything, but nearby debris it hasn’t yet swallowed up orbits in a pattern called an accretion disk.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 2
This is interesting!