Tech & Science: United Arab Emirates spy satellite crashes into the ocean after failed rocket launch - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

Tech & ScienceUnited Arab Emirates spy satellite crashes into the ocean after failed rocket launch

20:22  12 july  2019
20:22  12 july  2019 Source:   bgr.com

Russia’s Soyuz rocket got nailed by lightning shortly after launch

Russia’s Soyuz rocket got nailed by lightning shortly after launch When planning for a rocket launch there are many things that have to be taken into account, and one of the biggest factors is always the weather. 

The launch of a new Airbus-built spy satellite by the United Arab Emirates would likely have flown well under the news radar as well, if not for the fact that the spacecraft never actually made it into orbit. A rocket failure doomed the satellite and sent it crashing down into the Atlantic Ocean .

The United Arab Emirates lost a spy satellite after a failed rocket launch from the South American country of French Guiana late Wednesday. It’s still unclear what caused the failure , which became evident about two minutes after liftoff. First reported by Spaceflight Now, the 98-foot-tall European

United Arab Emirates spy satellite crashes into the ocean after failed rocket launch © Provided by Penske Media Corporation vv15_liftoff1

Military bodies around the world rely on surveillance satellites to help them keep an eye on potential enemies and allies alike.

Everyone watches everyone, and you don’t usually hear about the launch of such satellites because they’re both common and not often bragged about by the governments launching them.

The launch of a new Airbus-built spy satellite by the United Arab Emirates would likely have flown well under the news radar as well, if not for the fact that the spacecraft never actually made it into orbit. A rocket failure doomed the satellite and sent it crashing down into the Atlantic Ocean.

SpaceX postpones Starlink satellite launch again, for 'about a week'

SpaceX postpones Starlink satellite launch again, for 'about a week' A SpaceX launch already scrubbed once due to inclement weather was postponed again nearly 24 hours later on Thursday, this time for "about a week," in order to update satellite software and "triple-check everything," Elon Musk's rocket company said. The delayed mission is designed to carry into low-Earth orbit an initial batch of 60 satellites for Musk's new Starlink global internet service, a venture intended to generate cash for the rest of the billionaire entrepreneur's space exploration ambitions.

The spy satellite crashed into the Atlantic Ocean , mere minutes after its liftoff. The satellite crash happened due to a failed rocket launch from French Guiana on Wednesday. The United Arab Emirates ’ #FalconEye1 satellite will be released into Sun-synchronous orbit during a flight lasting 57

European Space Agency launches investigation after rocket FAILS minutes into launch and sends UAE spy satellite crashing into the Atlantic Ocean . Earth-observation satellite is estimated to cost hundreds of millions of dollars. Flight controllers began reporting signs of problems two minutes after

As Spaceflight Now reports, the Wednesday launch of the satellite aboard a European Vega rocket ended abruptly roughly two minutes after lifting off from its launchpad in French Guiana.

The launch was being conducted by Arianespace, and the company had little in the way of answers in the hours that followed the failure.

“As you have seen, about two minutes after liftoff, around the Z23 (second stage) ignition, a major anomaly occurred, resulting in the loss of the mission,” Luce Fabreguettes, Arianespace EVP of missions, operations, and purchasing, said in a statement. “On behalf of Arianespace, I wish to express our deepest apologies to our customers for the loss of their payload.”

There’s no information on what may have prompted the “major anomaly,” but it apparently occurred just after the rocket’s second stage lit up. The company says it will open a commission to get to the bottom of the failure.

Arianespace has a number of launches in its upcoming schedule, including the launch of what would have been a second surveillance satellite identical to the one that landed in the ocean yesterday. It’s unclear if that launch will be affected by the failure.

NASA’s about to test a safer rocket fuel for the first time ever.
The fuel that powers most spacecraft today is incredibly toxic to living organisms. That’s normally not a big issue when you’re sending something into space, but it can still pose some risks if a mishap results in a spacecraft crashing back down to Earth. It’s also a major obstacle for engineers who work closely with space-bound hardware on a daily basis. NASA thinks it might have a fix for all of this in the form of a new, “green” fuel alternative that swaps highly toxic hydrazine with a new formulation that much safer and, as it turns out, even more powerful than modern rocket fuels.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!