Tech & Science: NASA fires up Orion’s engines for critical test - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Tech & ScienceNASA fires up Orion’s engines for critical test

06:50  09 august  2019
06:50  09 august  2019 Source:   bgr.com

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“Inserting Orion into lunar orbit and returning the crew on a trajectory back home to Earth requires extreme precision in both plotting the course and firing the 5 test was conducted using a qualification version of the propulsion system at NASA ’ s White Sands Test Facility near Las Cruces, New Mexico.

Engineers fired up the Orion service module' s main engine and eight auxiliary engines . The team also activated the module' s smaller thrusters throughout the test . The service module is responsible for maneuvering Orion in space and providing the life support system for the crew capsule where the

NASA fires up Orion’s engines for critical test © Provided by Penske Media Corporation pqm8-6-192

NASA is sending humans back to the Moon. Nobody knows for sure whether that will happen in 2024 or a somewhat later date, but it’s definitely happening in the near future. When those important missions finally launch, the Orion service module will play a big role, and NASA just conducted a very important test to ensure the spacecraft’s engines are up to the task.

The 12-minute-long test saw the module’s engines fire continuously to simulate a scenario in which a rocket launch fails to push Orion with enough force to make it to the Moon. Orion’s engines would be used to allow the spacecraft to enter a safe orbit around Earth while NASA can decide how to proceed.

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5, 2019, we put our Orion spacecraft' s propulsion system to the test ! Watch the auxiliary and main engines Watch the auxiliary and main engines fire up , simulating a challenging mission scenario: boosting Orion into a temporary orbit. NASA Live: Official Stream of NASA TV NASA 94 зрителя.

Watch: NASA Fires Up Orion ' s Propulsion System for Mission Safety Test . NASA 's Orion spacecraft completed a critical propulsion test , which simulated the abort-to-orbit scenario. During the 12 minute test NASA and @AirbusSpace team fired Orion ’ s main engine , 8 auxiliary thrusters

Sending humans into space means planning for the unexpected, which is exactly what NASA is doing in this case. The space agency explains in a new post:

This test simulated what is referred to as an abort-to-orbit scenario. In the event the interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) was unable to set the spacecraft on its path to the Moon, Orion would deliberately separate early from the ICPS and the ESA (European Space Agency)-provided service module’s engines would fire to boost the spacecraft into a safe, temporary orbit. That would allow time to evaluate the crew and spacecraft before a decision is made to either continue with an alternate mission profile, or return to Earth.

The test required Orion to fire its main engine alongside all eight of its auxiliary engines at the same time. Additional thrusters were fired intermittently during the test to simulate adjustments being made to the spacecraft’s trajectory as though it were actually in space.

“Inserting Orion into lunar orbit and returning the crew on a trajectory back home to Earth requires extreme precision in both plotting the course and firing the engines to execute that plan,” NASA’s Mark Kirasich said in a statement. “With each testing campaign we conduct like this one, we’re getting closer to accomplishing our missions to the Moon and beyond.”

NASA’s new launch pad can shoot out 1,000,000 gallons of water a minute.
Whenever there's a high-profile NASA mission on the horizon you can expect to hear about the various tests leading up to an eventual launch. Firing huge rocket engines is cool, and testing new instruments on a rover is pretty exciting, too, but spewing a bunch of water across a launch pad? Well, It’s a little less glamorous, but still needs to be done. The mobile launch pad for the upcoming Artemis I mission, called Pad 39B, will be the last piece of solid ground that astronauts will stand on before embarking on a mission to the lunar surface.

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