Tech & Science: Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

Tech & ScienceBaby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago

06:50  15 august  2019
06:50  15 august  2019 Source:   bgr.com

Earth May Have Supported Life Much Earlier Than We Thought, Study Suggests

Earth May Have Supported Life Much Earlier Than We Thought, Study Suggests Early Earth grew up in a chaotic time. 

A colossal, head-on collision between Jupiter and a still-forming planet in the early solar system, about 4 . 5 billion years ago , could explain surprising In all cases, Liu and colleagues found there was at least a 40% chance that Jupiter would swallow a planetary embryo within its first few million years .

Through a computer-simulated study, astronomers at Lund University in Sweden show that it is highly likely that the so-called Planet 9 is an exoplanet.

Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago © Provided by Penske Media Corporation jupiter

Jupiter has long been hailed as the mighty “king of planets” thanks to its massive size compared to most of the other planets in our solar system. It’s huge, and it’s mostly made of gas, making it difficult for scientists to know what lies deep beneath its thick cloud cover.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft has been studying the planet in detail for over eight years now, and it’s returned some surprising observations about the planet’s core. Now, a new study from an international team of researchers may offer an explanation.

Scans from NASA’s Juno spacecraft have hinted that Jupiter’s core isn’t exactly what scientists once thought it was. The core isn’t as dense as researchers suspected, but determining why that is has proven to be a challenge.

Scientists just discovered a planet shaped like a football

Scientists just discovered a planet shaped like a football If you were to make a list of exoplanets that would be worth visiting in person, WASP-121b wouldn't be anywhere near the top of your list. 

As the genesis moment for the blue planet and its signature single moon, the Big Splash can be dated quite accurately to about 4 . 5 billion years ago . This week, one of the discoveries, by a team led by Daniel Herwartz of the University of Cologne in Germany, was that the moon is mostly made of Theia.

Through a computer-simulated study, astronomers at Lund University in Sweden show that it is highly likely that the so-called Planet 9 is an exoplanet. This would make it the first exoplanet to be discovered inside our own solar system. The theory is that our sun, in its youth some 4 . 5 billion years ago , stole

“This is puzzling,” Andrea Isella, co-author of a new study published in Nature, said in a statement. “It suggests that something happened that stirred up the core, and that’s where the giant impact comes into play.”

Related Slideshow: Amazing facts to know about Jupiter (Provided by Photo Services)

Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
Baby Jupiter was smacked by a planet 4.5 billion years ago
To get to the bottom of the mystery, the team ran computer simulations of early Jupiter to see what kind of interactions may have led to the planet’s present state. What they found was that a massive impact, while the planet was still forming, is likely the best explanation.

“Because it’s dense, and it comes in with a lot of energy, the impactor would be like a bullet that goes through the atmosphere and hits the core head-on,” Isella explains. “Before impact, you have a very dense core, surrounded by atmosphere. The head-on impact spreads things out, diluting the core.”

The planet that may have struck Jupiter would have to have been huge, according to the simulations. The researchers estimate that it would have been roughly 10 times as massive as Earth, and it would have messed things up so dramatically that it would take billions of years to settle back down, explaining why the core of Jupiter isn’t nearly as dense and compact as scientists think it should be.

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Is Behaving Strangely.
For a time, it looked as though the planet’s defining feature might be on the verge of extinction. “Are we seeing the ‘beginning of the end’? The GRS Death dance?” one astronomer wondered aloud in a Facebook group for Jupiter enthusiasts. “I was scared because if the Great Red Spot disappears … it’s like you go to New York and remove the Statue of Liberty,” another told me. As it has shrunk, the storm has also grown darker, redder, and taller; this year, the color palette is more intense than ever, according to a NASA press release accompanying new photos of Jupiter taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!