Tech & Science: The Amazon Has Seen More Than 100,000 Fires This Year, Causing Spike In Air Pollution - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Tech & ScienceThe Amazon Has Seen More Than 100,000 Fires This Year, Causing Spike In Air Pollution

13:50  11 september  2019
13:50  11 september  2019 Source:   gizmodo.com.au

How Did the Amazon Rainforest Fires Start?

How Did the Amazon Rainforest Fires Start? Brazil has experienced a record number of wildfires this year, more than half of which occurred in the Amazon region. That's according to data collected by the country's National Institute for Space Research (INPE). © Thomson Reuters Smoke billows during a fire in an area of the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, Brazil August 21, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino The figures show an 83 percent increase in comparison to the same period in 2018, representing the highest number of blazes since the agency began collecting such data in 2013, Reuters reported.

The fires burning throughout the Amazon rainforest and the rest of Brazil are billowing all types of air pollutants into the atmosphere, new With the spike in fires , ESA found that the rates of dangerous pollutants like carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and aerosols have gone up dramatically this year

This article is more than 1 year old. The shopping frenzy will see 82, 000 diesel delivery vans on UK streets, with plastic toys and The online shopping frenzy of the Black Friday weekend will see 82, 000 diesel vans and trucks on UK roads, raising concerns of air pollution spikes on residential streets as

The Amazon Has Seen More Than 100,000 Fires This Year, Causing Spike In Air Pollution © Image: European Space Agency Carbon monoxide emissions over the Amazon for the first two weeks of August (Image: European Space Agency)

The fires burning throughout the Amazon rainforest and the rest of Brazil are billowing all types of air pollutants into the atmosphere, new satellite images from the European Space Agency (ESA) show.

The Amazon Has Seen More Than 100,000 Fires This Year, Causing Spike In Air Pollution © Reuters A fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle near Porto Velho, Brazil on September 9, 2019

The agency released the images Tuesday, reminding the world that the Amazon fires aren’t just an environmental issue — but a public health issue, as well. The images come as the number of Brazil’s forest fires soar past 100,000, a 45 per cent increase from this same time last year, according to Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research.

Amazon fires: Brazil's president accuses world leaders of 'interfering'

Amazon fires: Brazil's president accuses world leaders of 'interfering' Brazil's president has accused other countries of interfering as they express fears for the burning Amazon rainforest. The number of forest fires in Brazil - more than 74,000 - has increased by 83% compared with the same period last year, with smoke that is visible from 400 miles up in space. World leaders are increasingly worried about the situation, as the Amazon - described as the world's lungs - is a vital absorber of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Air pollution is hard to escape, no matter how rich an area you live in. It is all around us. Air pollution is closely linked to climate change - the main driver of climate change is fossil fuel This month, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that coal- fired electricity must

This article is more than 2 years old. Harvard and Columbia universities estimate tens of thousands of premature deaths in areas closest to blazes clearing But last year ’s fires were among the worst in memory and cloaked large parts of the region in choking smog for weeks, causing huge numbers to

The Amazon Has Seen More Than 100,000 Fires This Year, Causing Spike In Air Pollution © Provided by Pedestrian TV Group Pty Ltd Aerosols = bad (Illustration: With the spike in fires, ESA found that the rates of dangerous pollutants like carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and aerosols have gone up dramatically this year compared to last.

The particulate matter from the organic matter going up in flames can cause respiratory or cardiac issues for individuals exposed. Carbon monoxide can make it harder for individuals to breathe by reducing oxygen levels. The World Health Organised issued a warning to vulnerable communities just last week because of all this air pollution.

Watch: The Amazon ablaze (Sky News)

There are also environmental impacts as well. The black carbon emissions from the fire are absorbing sunlight and blocking outgoing energy, a process that can worsening warming. The forest is also releasing carbon dioxide from its burning trees, another factor that could speed up global warming.

The blazes in the Amazon are so big they can be seen from space. One map shows the alarming scale of the fires.

The blazes in the Amazon are so big they can be seen from space. One map shows the alarming scale of the fires. The Brazilian Amazon is burning at a record rate. Nearly 10,000 fires have sparked in the last week, and satellites have spotted the blazes.

Less than two months after the most destructive wildfire in the history of California the state is fighting yet another From the GIF above you can see that the polluted air from the Thomas Fire is spreading across California as well as The air pollution from the wildfire has exceeded a record 5, 000 µg/m3

This article is more than 3 years old. Outdoor pollution has risen 8% in five years with fast-growing The new data, drawn from city and academic records, shows a rapid deterioration in air quality as Outdoor air pollution causes more than 3m deaths a year - more than malaria and HIV/Aids - and

Many suspect that President Jair Bolsonaro’s new reign in the country has everything to do with this rise in Brazil’s forest fires. He’s been outspoken about handing the Amazon over to private interests, which burn the forest to clear land for crops, cattle, mining, and timber.

The Amazon Has Seen More Than 100,000 Fires This Year, Causing Spike In Air Pollution © Provided by Pedestrian TV Group Pty Ltd These maps show how much carbon monoxide has increased. (Image: The indigenous communities that live under the forest canopy have the most to lose as the Amazon continues to burn.

Unfortunately, the Amazon forest fires are part of a greater global trend: The number of global fires increased by nearly fourfold last month compared to last year. August 2018 saw 16,632 fires. August 2019? 79,000. The world is on fire.

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