Tech & Science: Russia scraps robot Fedor after space odyssey - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Tech & ScienceRussia scraps robot Fedor after space odyssey

17:40  11 september  2019
17:40  11 september  2019 Source:   msn.com

Russia launches space telescope

Russia launches space telescope Russia launched a space telescope Saturday from the cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, a joint project with Germany intended to replace one it lost in January. Video posted on the website of the Roskosmos, the Russian space agency, showed a Proton-M rocket carrying the Spektr-RG taking off from the launch pad at Baikonur. The launch was originally scheduled for June 21 but was postponed twice because of a battery problem. The Spektr-RG, developed with Germany, is a space observatory intended to replace the Spektr-R, known as the "Russian Hubble", which Roskosmos said it lost control of in January.

The anthropomorphic Russian robot has been around for several years now, touted as a demonstrator for Russian robotic technology and future helper in manned space exploration. It seems FEDOR (Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research) has matured enough to graduate from showing

An unmanned spacecraft carrying Russia 's first humanoid robot to be sent into orbit failed to dock at the International Space Station on Saturday, in Fedor has Instagram and Twitter accounts with posts saying it is learning new skills, such as opening a bottle of water. It was to trial those manual skills in

Russia scraps robot Fedor after space odyssey © - Russian robot Fedor cannot fulfill his mission to replace human astronauts on space walks, officials say

It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he could not replace astronauts on space walks.

"He won't fly there any more. There's nothing more for him to do there, he's completed his mission," Yevgeny Dudorov, executive director of robot developers Androidnaya Tekhnika, told RIA Novosti news agency.

The silvery anthropomorphic robot cannot fulfill its assigned task to replace human astronauts on long and risky space walks, Dudorov said.

US exempts aviation, space exports from new Russia sanctions

US exempts aviation, space exports from new Russia sanctions WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has decided to exempt aviation safety and space exploration technology from new sanctions it has levied against Russia in connection with the poisoning of a former Russian spy and his daughter in Britain. The State Department said late Friday that products related to those sectors will not be automatically subjected to an export ban that was announced by President Donald Trump this week. The sanctions do include a presumption of denial for export licenses for items that could be used in the production of chemical and biological weapons. They also mean the U.S.

A Russian humanoid robot has started his journey to the International Space Station, serving as a mechanical passenger for a new type of rocket. Fedor was initially developed by the Russian Emergency Ministry to replace humans working in dangerous conditions. Images and videos on social

Russia on Thursday launched an unmanned rocket carrying a life-size humanoid robot that will spend 10 days learning to assist astronauts on the International Space Fedor blasted off in a Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft at 6:38 am Moscow time (0338 GMT) from Russia 's Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Fedor, or Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research, was built to assist space station astronauts.

A storm of publicity surrounded Fedeor's space odyssey and provided some light relief for Russia's beleaguered space industry.

In the last year it has seen the unprecedented failure of a manned launch and continuing delays on construction of the Vostochny spacepad where President Vladimir Putin upbraided officials last week.

But Fedor turned out to have a design that does not work well in space -- standing 180 centimetres (six feet) tall, its long legs were not needed on space walks, Dudorov said.

Russia to send 'Fedor' its first humanoid robot into space

Russia to send 'Fedor' its first humanoid robot into space Russia was set to launch on Thursday an unmanned rocket carrying a life-size humanoid robot that will spend 10 days learning to assist astronauts on the International Space Station. 

Russia on April 22 launched an unmanned rocket carrying a life-size humanoid robot that will spend 10 days learning to assist astronauts on the

FEDOR (Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research) is expected to travel to space in 2021, and could be the only passenger on board Russia ’s

The Russian space agency said the legs were immobilised during the trip and Fedor was not programmed to grab space station hand rails to move about in microgravity.

Soyuz spacecraft carrying humanoid robot fails to dock with space station

Soyuz spacecraft carrying humanoid robot fails to dock with space station A Soyuz spacecraft carrying Russia's first humanoid robot on Saturday failed to dock automatically with the international space station, Moscow news agencies reported. 

Space -bound humanoid robot Fedor expected to dock at the ISS on Saturday with more than 650kg of cargo. "The robot 's main purpose is to be used in operations that are especially dangerous for humans on board spacecraft and in outer space ," Russian space agency Roscosmos said after the

Russia on Thursday launched an unmanned rocket carrying a life-size humanoid robot that will spend 10 days learning to assist astronauts on the International Space Station. Named Fedor , short for Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research, the robot is the first ever sent up by Russia . Fedor .

Dudorov said developers were sketching out plans for a replacement "that must suit the demands of working on the outside of the ship".

Fedor, officially Skybot F-850, rocketed to the ISS on August 22, entering the orbiting laboratory five days later.

On the station, the robot posed holding a Russian flag and for hugs with cosmonauts who were assigned to train it before touching down back on Earth on Monday.

A final tweet posted in an account in the robot's name said: "Now I'm in my case. I await directions for further tests after the flight."

Fedor was not the first robot to go into space. In 2011, NASA sent up Robonaut 2, a humanoid developed with General Motors that had a similar aim of working in high-risk environments.

It was returned to Earth in 2018 after experiencing technical problems.

In 2013, Japan sent up a small robot called Kirobo along with the ISS's first Japanese space commander. Developed with Toyota, it was able to hold conversations -- albeit only in Japanese.

Robot pole dancers to debut at French nightclub.
Robots and artificial intelligence has long been touted as a replacement for humans carrying out jobs around the world. However, robots are rarely thought of as pole dancers in nightclubs - but that is exactly what is happening in Nantes. Two robot dancers, wearing high heels and topped with a CCTV camera for a head, will debut at the SC-Club in the French city to celebrate its fifth anniversary next week. The bots were the brainchild of British artist Giles Walker, who has overlaid their metal bodies with parts from plastic mannequins.

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