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Tech & ScienceRussia scraps robot Fedor after space odyssey

17:40  11 september  2019
17:40  11 september  2019 Source:   msn.com

Russia launches space telescope

Russia launches space telescope Russia launched a space telescope Saturday from the cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, a joint project with Germany intended to replace one it lost in January. Video posted on the website of the Roskosmos, the Russian space agency, showed a Proton-M rocket carrying the Spektr-RG taking off from the launch pad at Baikonur. The launch was originally scheduled for June 21 but was postponed twice because of a battery problem. The Spektr-RG, developed with Germany, is a space observatory intended to replace the Spektr-R, known as the "Russian Hubble", which Roskosmos said it lost control of in January.

Russian robot Fedor cannot fulfill his mission to replace human astronauts on space walks, officials say. It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he could not replace astronauts on space walks.

It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he could not replace A storm of publicity surrounded Fedeor's space odyssey and provided some light relief for Russia 's beleaguered space industry.

Russia scraps robot Fedor after space odyssey © - Russian robot Fedor cannot fulfill his mission to replace human astronauts on space walks, officials say

It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he could not replace astronauts on space walks.

"He won't fly there any more. There's nothing more for him to do there, he's completed his mission," Yevgeny Dudorov, executive director of robot developers Androidnaya Tekhnika, told RIA Novosti news agency.

The silvery anthropomorphic robot cannot fulfill its assigned task to replace human astronauts on long and risky space walks, Dudorov said.

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बुधवार, 11 सितंबर 2019 Russia scraps robot Fedor after space odyssey | Blue Mother It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he could not replace astronauts on space walks.

Getting ready: Humanoid robot Fedor being tested ahead of its flight at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. | A storm of publicity surrounded Fedor ’s space odyssey and provided some light relief for Russia ’s beleaguered space industry. In the past year it has seen the unprecedented failure of a

Fedor, or Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research, was built to assist space station astronauts.

A storm of publicity surrounded Fedeor's space odyssey and provided some light relief for Russia's beleaguered space industry.

In the last year it has seen the unprecedented failure of a manned launch and continuing delays on construction of the Vostochny spacepad where President Vladimir Putin upbraided officials last week.

But Fedor turned out to have a design that does not work well in space -- standing 180 centimetres (six feet) tall, its long legs were not needed on space walks, Dudorov said.

Russia to send 'Fedor' its first humanoid robot into space

Russia to send 'Fedor' its first humanoid robot into space Russia was set to launch on Thursday an unmanned rocket carrying a life-size humanoid robot that will spend 10 days learning to assist astronauts on the International Space Station. 

The Russian space agency said the legs were immobilised during the trip and Fedor was not programmed to grab space station hand rails to move about in I await directions for further tests after the flight." Fedor was not the first robot to go into space . In 2011, NASA sent up Robonaut 2, a

A Russian humanoid robot has started his journey to the International Space Station, serving as a mechanical passenger for a new type of rocket. Fedor was initially developed by the Russian Emergency Ministry to replace humans working in dangerous conditions. Images and videos on social

The Russian space agency said the legs were immobilised during the trip and Fedor was not programmed to grab space station hand rails to move about in microgravity.

International Space Station crew relocates Soyuz capsule

International Space Station crew relocates Soyuz capsule The crew of the International Space Station has successfully relocated a Soyuz space capsule to another docking port to facilitate the rendezvous with another spacecraft. The maneuver followed Saturday's failed docking of the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft. The docking attempt was aborted due to a suspected glitch linked to an automated control system on board the space station. Another attempt will be made Tuesday. © Provided by The Associated Press CORRECTING ROCKET NAME AND ADDING ROBOT DETAILS - In this photo taken on Thursday, Aug.

It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he A storm of publicity surrounded Fedeor's space odyssey and provided some light relief for Russia 's beleaguered space industry. In the last year it has seen

Russian robot Fedor cannot fulfill his mission to replace human astronauts on space walks, officials say. It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he could not replace astronauts on space walks.

Dudorov said developers were sketching out plans for a replacement "that must suit the demands of working on the outside of the ship".

Fedor, officially Skybot F-850, rocketed to the ISS on August 22, entering the orbiting laboratory five days later.

On the station, the robot posed holding a Russian flag and for hugs with cosmonauts who were assigned to train it before touching down back on Earth on Monday.

A final tweet posted in an account in the robot's name said: "Now I'm in my case. I await directions for further tests after the flight."

Fedor was not the first robot to go into space. In 2011, NASA sent up Robonaut 2, a humanoid developed with General Motors that had a similar aim of working in high-risk environments.

It was returned to Earth in 2018 after experiencing technical problems.

In 2013, Japan sent up a small robot called Kirobo along with the ISS's first Japanese space commander. Developed with Toyota, it was able to hold conversations -- albeit only in Japanese.

robot lands on asteroid: do researchers now find the origin of our solar system? .
© picture alliance / dpa Infinite vastness: The space probe Hayabusa has landed on an asteroid. Our archive picture is from the year 2012. Zero gravity mission: The Japanese space probe "Hayabusa 2" has exposed an exploration robot above the asteroid Ryugu. The small scout "Minerva-II-2" is to collect data on the density of the asteroid.

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