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Tech & ScienceMars’ North Pole looks so bizarre in new photo by ExoMars orbiter

06:25  18 september  2019
06:25  18 september  2019 Source:   bgr.com

India successfully launches its first lunar lander bound for the Moon

India successfully launches its first lunar lander bound for the Moon India could become the fourth nation to touch down on the lunar surface in September. If successful, India will become the fourth nation to ever land a vehicle intact on the Moon. The lander is just one of a handful of vehicles headed to the Moon as part of India’s Chandrayaan-2 mission. It’s a follow up to Chandrayaan-1, India’s very first robotic mission to the Moon. That initiative, launched in 2008, successfully put a spacecraft in orbit around the Moon, as well as sent a probe crashing into the lunar surface.

The Mars we often seen in photos from rovers and orbiters is dry, dusty, and barren, but there are parts of the planet that, when viewed separately, could trick you into thinking you're looking at a The latest snapshot captured by the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter fits perfectly into that latter category.

A new satellite orbiting Mars just sent home some amazing new images of the red planet's crags and cliffs. The ExoMars mission as a whole is designed to hunt for signs of life on the red planet. The Trace Gas Orbiter itself is built to sniff out gases in the atmosphere like methane that could indicate

Mars’ North Pole looks so bizarre in new photo by ExoMars orbiter © Provided by Penske Media Corporation North_polar_dunes_on_Mars_article_mob

The Mars we often seen in photos from rovers and orbiters is dry, dusty, and barren, but there are parts of the planet that, when viewed separately, could trick you into thinking you’re looking at a totally foreign alien land. The latest snapshot captured by the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter fits perfectly into that latter category.

The image was captured using the CaSSIS camera, one of the orbiter’s many instruments, and it shows the frosty dunes that cover the northern region of Mars that is rarely seen up-close. It also definitely looks at least a little bit like cookie-flavored ice cream.

NASA’s Mars 2020 rover is already getting a workout without leaving Earth

NASA’s Mars 2020 rover is already getting a workout without leaving Earth When NASA's Mars 2020 mission finally gets underway about a year from now it'll have been a long time coming. 

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury. In English, Mars carries a name of the Roman god of war and is often referred to as the 'Red

The following table is a list of Mars orbiters , consisting of space probes which were launched from Earth and are currently orbiting Mars .

As the European Space Agency explains in a post highlighting the photo, the dark areas are cracks and gaps in the ice that are formed when gas trapped below is released. When the gas breaks free, it carries dust and sand with it, covering the edges of the cracks with the darker material.

Similar to dunes seen on Earth, the flowing shapes that form on the surface of Mars are carved by winds. As ESA explains, the shapes we see in this particular image can tell scientists a lot about the processes happening on the surface:

The image also captures ‘barchan’ dunes – the crescent or U-shaped dunes seen in the right of the image – as they join and merge into barchanoid ridges. The curved tips of the barchan dunes point downwind. The transition from barchan to barchanoid dunes tells us that secondary winds also play a role in shaping the dune field.

Despite the fact that humans are seemingly destined to explore the Red Planet in person sooner rather than later, locations like this probably won’t be first on the list for those early travelers. For now, we’ll just have to enjoy the view from above.

NASA will spy on India’s crashed moon lander next week.
Late last week, India's ISRO space agency experienced utter heartbreak when its Chandrayaan-2 lunar lander went quiet moments before its expected touchdown. The spacecraft slammed into the Moon rather than landing softly, and nobody really knows if it’s still alive, or what kind of shape it’s in. To help its space-faring friends in India, NASA will do its best to spot the landing (or crash) site with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter next week. As Spaceflight Now reports, the US space agency will use the LRO’s powerful camera to scan Chandrayaan-2’s landing site on Tuesday.

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