Tech & Science: Facebook buys startup working on mind-control of machines - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Tech & Science Facebook buys startup working on mind-control of machines

07:15  24 september  2019
07:15  24 september  2019 Source:   msn.com

Six-year-old YouTube star buys £6.5m property

Six-year-old YouTube star buys £6.5m property A six-year-old South Korean YouTube star and her parents have purchased a multi-million pound property, according to reports. Boram is the country's most popular YouTuber and her two channels - a video blog and a series of toy reviews - have more than 30 million subscribers. The Maeil Business Newspaper reported the five-storey building is in Gangnam, one of Seoul's most affluent areas. The property was bought by the Boram Company, which was set up by the girl's parents, for 9.5 billion won (£6.5m). © Other Boram and her family have bought a five-storey property in Seoul.

Facebook on Monday said it had made a deal to buy a startup working on ways to command computers or other devices using thought instead of taps The vision for this work is a wristband that lets people control their devices as a natural extension of movement." Bosworth explained that the

Facebook has announced the purchase of CTRL-labs, a young company developing technology working on non-invasive systems that read your In a Facebook post announcing the news, its VP of AR/VR Andrew Bosworth offers a few details on how it hopes to put the startup ’s expertise to use.

a person standing in front of a crowd: Facebook's acquisition of CTRL-labs comes after it bought Oculus in early 2014, whose Quest VR headset has pushed down the price of virtual reality gear © ALAIN JOCARD Facebook's acquisition of CTRL-labs comes after it bought Oculus in early 2014, whose Quest VR headset has pushed down the price of virtual reality gear

Facebook on Monday said it had made a deal to buy a startup working on ways to command computers or other devices using thought instead of taps, swipes, or keystrokes.

CTRL-labs will become part of Facebook Reality Labs with an aim at perfecting the technology and getting it into consumer products, according to Andrew Bosworth, vice president of augmented and virtual reality at the California-based social network.

"We know there are more natural, intuitive ways to interact with devices and technology," Bosworth said in a post at Facebook announcing the acquisition.

Six-year-old YouTube star buys £6.5m property

Six-year-old YouTube star buys £6.5m property Six-year-old YouTube star buys £6.5m property

Facebook said Monday it's acquiring CTRL-labs, a neurotechnology startup , as part of efforts to develop a wristband for controlling smartphones Facebook first said in 2017 that it was working on a computer-brain interface that would let users type words and send messages using only their brains.

Facebook today announced that it is acquiring CTRL-labs, a New York-based startup developing technology that would allow humans to control computers As part of the acquisition, CTRL-labs will join Facebook ’s Reality Labs division, which is also working on developing augmented reality glasses.

"And we want to build them. The vision for this work is a wristband that lets people control their devices as a natural extension of movement."

Bosworth explained that the wristband will decode electrical impulses such as those sent to hand muscles telling them to move certain ways, such as clicking a computer mouse or pressing a button.

The wristband will translate impulses into signals a device can comprehend, having thoughts rather than mouse clicks or button presses prompt actions on computers, according to Facebook.

"It captures your intention so you can share a photo with a friend using an imperceptible movement or just by, well, intending to," Bosworth said.

"Technology like this has the potential to open up new creative possibilities and reimagine 19th century inventions in a 21st century world."

Facebook-backed research sees progress linking minds, machines

Facebook-backed research sees progress linking minds, machines Facebook-backed researchers have managed to translate brain signals into spoken words, bringing the social network's vision of linking brains and machines closer to reality. A study published in Nature Communications detailed how researchers were able to capture brain signals being sent to produce speech and figure out what people were trying to say. Facebook-backed researchers have managed to translate brain signals into spoken words, bringing the social network's vision of linking brains and machines closer to reality.

Facebook Inc. agreed to acquire CTRL-Labs, a technology startup that is building software to let people control a digital avatar using only their thoughts. The closely held four-year-old startup , which has dozens of employees and has raised tens of millions in venture capital, uses a bracelet to

A start - up which builds mind -reading computer interfaces is being bought out by Facebook , offering further proof of the social media giant's ambitions to forge a new kind of link between human and machine .

He spoke of how thought-commanded interactions might dramatically alter how people experience augmented or virtual reality scenarios, which currently feature hand-held controls.

Facebook did not disclose financial terms of the deal to buy New York-based CTRL-labs, but unconfirmed media reports said it paid more than $500 million.

After Facebook bought virtual-reality gear startup Oculus in early 2014 in a deal valued at $2 billion, social network co-founder and chief Mark Zuckerberg heralded the technology as the next major computing platform.

Oculus has since built a line of virtual reality gear, pushing down the price and eliminating the need to be plugged in to a computer with its Quest VR headset.

In Early 2017, Facebook announced projects aimed at allowing users to use their minds to type messages or their skin to hear words.

The projects were the focus of a team of scientists, engineers, and system integrators with a goal of "creating a system capable of typing 100 words-per-minute straight from your brain," Facebook said at the time.

Such brain-computer interface technology currently involves implanting electrodes, but Facebook wanted to use sensors that could be worn to eliminate the need to surgically intrude on the brain.

Such technology could for example let people fire off text messages or emails by thinking, instead of needing to interrupt what they are doing to use smartphone touchscreens.

Electric skateboard startup Inboard is for sale and all employees have been laid off .
A pivot to scooters went horribly wrongThe startup was one of the highest-profile competitors to top electric skateboard company Boosted, and last year announced plans to enter the electric scooter market — a push that seems to have doomed Inboard.

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