Tech & Science: NASA's new black hole simulation is mesmerizing - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Tech & Science NASA's new black hole simulation is mesmerizing

06:45  26 september  2019
06:45  26 september  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Astronomers probably just saw a black hole swallow a dead star

Astronomers probably just saw a black hole swallow a dead star Ripples in the fabric of spacetime reveal what may be a first-of-its-kind cosmic collision.

NASA ' s new visualization, on the other hand, is mesmerizing . The impressive visualization, created by Jeremy Schnittman using a custom software at NASA ' s Goddard Space Flight Center, is reminiscent of Interstellar's Gargantua black hole crossed with the EHTs image and demonstrates how the

Credits: NASA ’ s Goddard Space Flight Center. Download this video in HD formats from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio. The new simulation shows three orbits of a pair of supermassive black holes only 40 orbits from merging. The models reveal the light emitted at this

Warped. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Jeremy Schnittman © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Warped. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Jeremy Schnittman

The first ever image of a black hole, obtained by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration, is one of the most incredible scientific achievements of the past decade. The blurry orange ring snapped from across the universe took an incredible amount of data and smarts to produce. It makes me feel infinitely small in an infinitely fascinating universe.

But I have to level with you. As awe-inspiring and terrifying as it is, it's not all that much to look at. NASA's new visualization, on the other hand, is mesmerizing. 

NASA astronauts are preparing for the Moon in a big water tank

NASA astronauts are preparing for the Moon in a big water tank NASA astronauts are preparing for the Moon in a big water tank

Simulation of two supermassive black holes merging. NASA ’ s Goddard Space Flight Center. Based on these simulations , researchers think that it could be possible to spot a merger before it happens as ultraviolet and X-ray emissions from a pair of supermassive black holes should be more

NASA scientists have reached a breakthrough in computer modeling that allows them to simulate what gravitational waves from merging black holes look like. The simulation provides the foundation to explore the universe in an entirely new way, through the detection of gravitational waves.

The impressive visualization, created by Jeremy Schnittman using a custom software at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is reminiscent of Interstellar's Gargantua black hole crossed with the EHTs image and demonstrates how the galactic gravity sinks influence the spacetime surrounding them. 

Black holes are extremely dense regions of space with huge gravitational pull. It's so powerful not even light can escape from it. Gas, dust and debris that get pulled in by its gravity swing around the hole as if trapped in an insanely-fast, incredibly-hot carousel. The carousel, a bright halo of matter known as the accretion disk, is the visible portion of a black hole. Depending on what angle we see it from, our image can be dramatically skewed. 

NASA's visualization has us seeing the disk edge-on, so the light at the top of the image is actually from behind the black hole. Viewing the cosmic beast at this angle, we also see matter is much brighter on the left-hand side than the right because it's moving toward us, the viewer. A cosmic phenomenon known as "Doppler beaming" increases the level of brightness for light moving in such a way, and the opposite is true as it moves away from us. 

NASA is celebrating black holes for Black Hole Week and on Tuesday released a cutesy safety video demonstrating how to deal with the ever-mysterious monsters.

New class of black holes may exist, scientists say .
An entirely new class of black holes that scientists were unaware of may exist, according to a study. The study published on Thursday in Science revealed a new way for astronomers to search for black holes and that there could be an entire group of black holes smaller than the smallest black holes in the universe."We're showing this hint that there is another population out there that we have yet to really probe in the search for black holes," said Todd Thompson, a professor of astronomy at Ohio State University and lead author of the study, in a statement.

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