Tech & Science: NASA satellites reveal the world's thickest glacier is melting 80 YEARS ahead of schedule due to record high temperatures - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

Tech & Science NASA satellites reveal the world's thickest glacier is melting 80 YEARS ahead of schedule due to record high temperatures

20:05  08 november  2019
20:05  08 november  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Military chief warns UK 'fight is on in space' and Britain needs to 'speed up' its response to threats

Military chief warns UK 'fight is on in space' and Britain needs to 'speed up' its response to threats Exclusive: The RAF officer warned that 'defensive capabilities' need to be built into satellites to counter threats such as a rival power manoeuvring its space craft close to critical military or civilian satellites and jamming them. With both military and civilian life increasingly reliant on infrastructure in space, Western governments are alarmed at the potential for any future conflict with an adversary such as Russia or China to involve strikes on satellites designed to blind commanders on the ground. 'The fight is on' Air Vice-Marshal ‘Rocky’ Rochelle says: 'The fight is on.

The world's thickest glacier has succumb to the effects of climate change.

A set of images released by NASA's Earth observatory shows the Taku Glacier in Alaska is reseeding for the first time in over 70 years.

Researchers predicted that the alpine glacier would one-day retreat, but the decrease in mass is 80 years ahead of schedule.

Dr. Mauri Pelto, a professor of environmental science at Nichols College and the director of the North Cascades Glacier Climate Project, has been studying Taku for 30 years and believed it would continue to expand over the rest of the century, as it gained a mass of 1 feet per year from 1946 through 1988.

NASA snapped a new image of Saturn, and it’s a real stunner

NASA snapped a new image of Saturn, and it’s a real stunner As NASA explains in a new blog post, this new portrait reveals some interesting things about Saturn’s ring structure and even offers some clues about the planet’s intense weather. First and foremost, the new portrait is absolutely gorgeous. It’s one of the sharpest, most perfect captures of the ringed planet NASA has ever produced, and it’s easy to lose yourself for a moment just staring at it. However, as NASA is quick to point out in a new blog post, pointing Hubble’s lens at Saturn wasn’t just about capturing some new cosmic eye candy: These images, however, are more than just beauty shots.

a close up of a large rock: Taku is deemed the thickest glacier in the world measuring 4,860 feet from top to bottom and is also the largest in the Juneau Icefield. © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Taku is deemed the thickest glacier in the world measuring 4,860 feet from top to bottom and is also the largest in the Juneau Icefield. However, the thickening did slowing down in 1989 and expansion came to a complete halt from 2013 to 2018.

Last year, it began to show visible signs of retreating, which Pelto said is linked to the record summer temperatures in Alaska.

Scroll down for video

'We thought the mass balance at Taku was so positive that it was going to be able to advance for the rest of the century,' said Pelto.

'A lot of times, glaciers will stop advancing for quite a few years before retreats starts.'

'I don't think most of us thought Taku was going to retreat so quickly.'

Pelto has been observing 250 massive glacier around the world for over three decades and Taku was the only one that hadn't shown signs of retreating.

Swiss to hold high-altitude wake for lost glacier

  Swiss to hold high-altitude wake for lost glacier Dozens of people will undertake a "funeral march" up a steep Swiss mountainside on Sunday to mark the disappearance of an Alpine glacier amid growing global alarm over climate change. The Pizol "has lost so much substance that from a scientific perspective it is no longer a glacier," Alessandra Degiacomi, of the Swiss Association for Climate Protection, told AFP.

'This is a big deal for me because I had this one glacier I could hold on to,' Pelto said.

'But not anymore. This makes the score climate change: 250 and alpine glaciers: 0.'

Pelto uncovered the effects of climate change using images from NASA's Earth observatory, which allowed him to analyze changes in the transient snowline—the boundary where snow transitions to bare glacier ice.

a close up of a map: A set of images released by NASA¿s Earth observatory show the Taku Glacier that stands north of Juneau, Alaska © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A set of images released by NASA¿s Earth observatory show the Taku Glacier that stands north of Juneau, Alaska At the end of the summer, the height of the snowline represents the point where the glacier experienced an equal amount of melting and snow accumulation.

If a glacier experiences more melting than snow accumulation in a season, the glacier's snowline migrates to higher altitudes.

Researchers can calculate net changes in glacier mass by tracking the shift of the snow line, which Pelto was able to see in the images.

NASA chief throws shade at SpaceX ahead of Elon Musk's Starship update

  NASA chief throws shade at SpaceX ahead of Elon Musk's Starship update Jim Bridenstine appears to question SpaceX's enthusiasm for NASA's Commercial Crew program aimed at getting astronauts to the ISS.Bridenstine dropped an unexpected statement on Twitter on Friday, writing, "I am looking forward to the SpaceX announcement tomorrow. In the meantime, Commercial Crew is years behind schedule. NASA expects to see the same level of enthusiasm focused on the investments of the American taxpayer. It's time to deliver.

'We thought the mass balance at Taku was so positive that it was going to be able to advance for the rest of the century,' said Pelto.

'A lot of times, glaciers will stop advancing for quite a few years before retreats starts.

'I don't think most of us thought Taku was going to retreat so quickly.'

Taku is deemed the thickest glacier in the world measuring 4,860 feet from top to bottom and is also the largest in the Juneau Icefield.

Sun 'smiles' like a Halloween pumpkin in NASA image .
A mischievous-looking picture of the Sun "smiling" like a Halloween pumpkin has been tweeted by NASA. The picture was snapped by the space agency's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite and shows the sun in ultraviolet light. © Getty NASA says the resemblance to a jack-o'-lantern is caused by "active regions" which appear brighter because they emit more light and energy."This image blends together two sets of extreme ultraviolet wavelengths at 171 and 193 Angstroms, typically colorized in gold and yellow, to create a particularly Halloween-like appearance," says the space agency.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!