Tech & Science: Supermassive black hole ejects star from Milky Way Galaxy - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Tech & Science Supermassive black hole ejects star from Milky Way Galaxy

18:20  15 november  2019
18:20  15 november  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

Astronomers spot a trio of black holes on a devastating collision course

  Astronomers spot a trio of black holes on a devastating collision course Black holes are one of the most interesting features of our universe. So incredibly dese that their gravitational pull can swallow up light itself, they are enormously powerful on their own, but when three of them get together? Well, that’s a recipe for some serious fireworks.As NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory explains in a new post, astronomers using powerful imaging hardware, including three of NASA’s own telescopes, have spotted a trio of black holes in the midst of a cosmic dance. The holes were spotted in a distant galactic collision that could offer hints at the fate that awaits our own Milky Way.

Supermassive black hole throws star out of Milky Way galaxy at speed of 3.7 million mph. By Sophie Lewis. Researchers said the "runaway" star was traveling at speeds about 10 times faster than most other stars in the galaxy . "The velocity of the discovered star is so high that it will inevitably leave the

Supermassive black hole throws star out of Milky Way galaxy at speed of 3.7 million mph. By Sophie Lewis. Researchers said the "runaway" star was traveling at speeds about 10 times faster than most other stars in the galaxy . "The velocity of the discovered star is so high that it will inevitably leave the

hypervelocitystar2-1-550x376.jpg © Carnegie Science hypervelocitystar2-1-550x376.jpg

Five million years ago, when humanity's ancestors were just learning to walk upright, a star was ejected from Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy, at a staggering 3.7 million mph. This month, a group of researchers spotted the superfast star traveling relatively close to Earth.

Researchers, led by Sergey Koposov of Carnegie Mellon University's McWilliams Center for Cosmology as part of the Southern Stellar Stream Spectroscopic Survey (S5), spotted the star — known as S5-HVS1 — in the constellation Grus. According to a press release Tuesday, the star was just traveling just 29,000 light-years away from Earth, or "practically next door by astronomical standards."

Black hole swallowing and ripping apart star captured for first time

  Black hole swallowing and ripping apart star captured for first time A gigantic black hole has been captured pulling in and ripping apart a star for the first time. The star, which was about the same size as our sun, was seen from 375 million light years away warping and spiralling into the gravitational pull of a supermassive black hole, researchers said in the Astrophysical Journal. © Reuters The supermassive black hole swallowed up and destroyed a star the size of the Earth's sun Pic: Nasa graphic It was then sucked into oblivion in a rare cosmic occurrence astronomers call a tidal disruption event.

A supermassive black hole (SMBH or sometimes SBH) is the largest type of black hole , containing a mass of the order of hundreds of thousands to billions of times the mass of the Sun (M☉)

Supermassive Black Hole in the Milky Way Galaxy (Version 1) - Продолжительность: 20:09 SpaceRip Recommended for you. What's Inside A Black Hole ? |

Researchers said the "runaway" star was traveling at speeds about 10 times faster than most other stars in the galaxy. "The velocity of the discovered star is so high that it will inevitably leave the [Milky Way] and never return," said co-author Douglas Boubert of the University of Oxford.

"This is super exciting, as we have long suspected that black holes can eject stars with very high velocities," Koposov said. "However, we never had an unambiguous association of such a fast star with the Galactic Center." 

Astronomer Jack Hills first proposed that black holes can eject superfast stars at high velocities. But S5-HVS1 is the first time scientists have actually witnessed Hills Mechanism in action. 

New class of black holes may exist, scientists say

  New class of black holes may exist, scientists say An entirely new class of black holes that scientists were unaware of may exist, according to a study. The study published on Thursday in Science revealed a new way for astronomers to search for black holes and that there could be an entire group of black holes smaller than the smallest black holes in the universe."We're showing this hint that there is another population out there that we have yet to really probe in the search for black holes," said Todd Thompson, a professor of astronomy at Ohio State University and lead author of the study, in a statement.

Astronomers tracking stars in the center of the galaxy have found the best proof to date that black holes exist. Now, they are shooting for the first But our galaxy is a different story. We live inside it, of course. Becklin had to find a way to see through all the dust and gas that obscure our line of sight into

A SUPERMASSIVE black hole at the heart of the Milky Way was caught catapulting an entire star out of the galaxy at speeds exceeding 3.7 million He said: “The centre of the galaxy is a maelstrom of objects circling and falling into a massive black hole , Sagittarius A*, and yet there seem to be stars

The discovery was made using the 12.8-foot Anglo-Australian Telescope and observations from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite. The relative closeness of the star allowed for an "unprecedented" opportunity to learn about the phenomena. 

a star filled sky: Envisioning black holes © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Envisioning black holes

"Seeing this star is really amazing", Carnegie's Ting Li said. "As we know it must have formed in the Galactic Center, a place very different to our local environment. It is a visitor from a strange land."

Koposov and his team are now able to track the star's journey back to the center of the galaxy. They hypothesize that S5-HVS1 used to live with a companion star, but when the two drifted too close to Sagittarius A*, its companion was captured, while it was thrown back out.

"My favorite part of this discovery is thinking about where this star came from and where it's going," said Carnegie's Alex Ji. "It was born in one of the craziest places in the universe, near a supermassive black hole with lots of other nearby star friends; but it's going to leave our galaxy and die all alone, out in the middle of nowhere. Quite a fall from grace."

Hubble spots two galaxies rubbing off on each other .
Size is always relative, and that's especially true when it comes to outer space. We're tiny creatures, so we think of the Earth as this incredibly large thing, with our solar system being almost impossibly large. In this image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, the cosmic feature known as Arp 293 is presented in gorgeous detail. Arp 293 is actually two separate galaxies that have drifted so close to one another that they’ve begun to share some of their material.

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