Tech & Science: Two Vast 'Peacock-Shaped' Cosmic Clouds Spotted by Astronomers in Nearby Galaxy - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
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Tech & Science Two Vast 'Peacock-Shaped' Cosmic Clouds Spotted by Astronomers in Nearby Galaxy

18:20  15 november  2019
18:20  15 november  2019 Source:   newsweek.com

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Two peacock - shaped gaseous clouds were revealed in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). A team of astronomers found several massive baby stars in the complex filamentary clouds , which agrees well with computer simulations of giant collisions of gaseous clouds . The researchers interpret this to

Two peacock - shaped gaseous clouds were revealed in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) A team of astronomers found several massive baby stars in the complex filamentary clouds , which Due to the colossal gravity, clouds in the galaxies are stirred, stretched, and often collide with each other.

a worm in the dark: ALMA images of two molecular clouds: N159E-Papillon Nebula (left) and N159W South (right). Red and green show the distributions of molecular gas with different velocities. The blue region in N159E-Papillon Nebula shows the ionized hydrogen gas observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. The blue part in N159W South shows the emissions from dust particles obtained with ALMA. © ALMA ESO/NAOJ/NRAO/Fukui et al./Tokuda et al./NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope ALMA images of two molecular clouds: N159E-Papillon Nebula (left) and N159W South (right). Red and green show the distributions of molecular gas with different velocities. The blue region in N159E-Papillon Nebula shows the ionized hydrogen gas observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. The blue part in N159W South shows the emissions from dust particles obtained with ALMA.

Astronomers have spotted a pair of vast peacock-shaped gaseous clouds in a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.

The researchers identified the cosmic features in this neighboring galaxy—known as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC)—using telescopes at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) according to two papers published in The Astrophysical Journal.

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  Astronomers spot a trio of black holes on a devastating collision course Black holes are one of the most interesting features of our universe. So incredibly dese that their gravitational pull can swallow up light itself, they are enormously powerful on their own, but when three of them get together? Well, that’s a recipe for some serious fireworks.As NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory explains in a new post, astronomers using powerful imaging hardware, including three of NASA’s own telescopes, have spotted a trio of black holes in the midst of a cosmic dance. The holes were spotted in a distant galactic collision that could offer hints at the fate that awaits our own Milky Way.

Scientists say newfound giant clouds of gas between nearby galaxies may be the fuel for future star birth. A never-before-seen interstellar network of gas between two nearby galaxies may provide the raw A team of astronomers led by Spencer Wolfe of West Virginia University used the Green Bank

Amazingly, astronomers studying this cloud have found the population consists of three separate generations of stars. The ones in those blobs are merely the youngest, but the most aged stars are only a few million years older. Even the most decrepit of stars in this cloud is only a thousandth as old as

Within these complex clouds, the astronomers identified several massive baby stars—a discovery which suggests that the LMC violently collided with another neighboring galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), around 200 million years ago.

It is well established that stars are formed when interstellar clouds in space—formed mainly of hydrogen and helium—collapse under the weight of their own gravity. However, there is still some debate about how particularly large stars—those which are 10 times more massive than the sun or more—form due to the fact that compressing a sufficient amount of material into a relatively small space requires extremely strong forces.

One hypothesis proposes that these massive stars could be formed when galaxies interact with one another. According to this idea, the immense amount of gravitational forces involved in these interactions could stir up the clouds, potentially compressing materials into a sufficiently small area to form massive stars.

Scientists discover oldest galaxy cluster

  Scientists discover oldest galaxy cluster Astronomers have discovered a 13-billion-year-old galaxy cluster that is the earliest ever observed, according to a paper released Friday, a finding that may hold clues about how the universe developed. Such an early-stage cluster -- called a protocluster -- is "not easy to find", Yuichi Harikane, a researcher at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan who led the international team, said in a press release.

Two colorful gas clouds shaped like peacocks have been spotted in the Large Magellanic Cloud , a neighboring dwarf galaxy about 163,000 light years away. In the vastness of space, it's nice to have a neighbor. For our galaxy , the Milky Way, that's the Large Magellanic Cloud and its sibling, the Small

This is a list of known galaxies within 3.8 megaparsecs (12 million light-years) of the Solar System, in ascending order of distance. This encompasses all of the about 50 Local Group galaxies

The ALMA data shows that the two peacock-shaped features are located about 150 light-years away from each other in a star-forming region of the LMC known as N159. Intriguingly, they look remarkably similar, indicating that they could have been produced in a similar manner.

"It is unnatural that in two regions separated by 150 light-years, clouds with such similar shapes were formed and that the ages of the baby stars are similar," Kazuki Tokuda, one of the authors of the two studies from Osaka Prefecture University and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, said in a statement. "There must be a common cause of these features. Interaction between the LMC and SMC is a good candidate."

According to the astronomers, the latest findings could have important implications for our understanding of how massive stars form.

"For the first time, we uncovered a link between massive star formation and galaxy interactions in very sharp detail," Yasuo Fukui, lead author of one of the research papers, said in the statement. "This is an important step in understanding the formation process of massive star clusters in which galaxy interactions have a big impact."

The Small Magellanic Cloud is a dwarf galaxy located 200,000 light-years from Earth. Its larger cousin, the LMC—which contains around 30 billion stars—is located around 158,200 light-years away from us.

Hubble snaps ridiculously gorgeous shot of distant galaxy .
When astronomers peer deep into space, what they see is what they get. Humans have developed some seriously impressive imaging tools for observing faraway objects in space, but capturing images of something like a distant galaxy from multiple angles is impossible. Depending on the angle of a galaxy in relation to our planet, scientists may only see a blurry side view. Others show their face in stunning detail, and the galaxy known as NGC 5468 most definitely falls into the latter group. As NASA shows off in a new showcase, the Hubble Space Telescope snapped an absolutely lovely photo of the swirling mass of stars.

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