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Tech & Science SpaceX’s satellite horde is a nightmare for astronomers

17:00  20 november  2019
17:00  20 november  2019 Source:   bgr.com

NASA chief throws shade at SpaceX ahead of Elon Musk's Starship update

  NASA chief throws shade at SpaceX ahead of Elon Musk's Starship update Jim Bridenstine appears to question SpaceX's enthusiasm for NASA's Commercial Crew program aimed at getting astronauts to the ISS.Bridenstine dropped an unexpected statement on Twitter on Friday, writing, "I am looking forward to the SpaceX announcement tomorrow. In the meantime, Commercial Crew is years behind schedule. NASA expects to see the same level of enthusiasm focused on the investments of the American taxpayer. It's time to deliver.

Starlink is SpaceX ’ s communications project that aims to provide satellite internet access to just about every corner of the globe. It could be a big deal, but it’s going to require many, many satellites . SpaceX imagines that as many as 42,000 individual satellites may be launched as part of the project.

SpaceX ' s plan could make astronomy 'impossible'. SpaceX has said it plans to paint its satellites black on the sides that face Earth, making them less As helpful as SpaceX ' s Starlink satellites may be, they could be a pain for astronomers . The Harvard-Smithsonian Center's Jonathan McDowell

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SpaceX has done a lot to help scientists over the years. It’s a business, first and foremost, but by lowering the bar for satellite launches it has facilitated research that might not otherwise have been possible. Unfortunately, the company’s Starlink project is doing the exact opposite by hindering the ability of astronomers to observe the cosmos.

Starlink is SpaceX’s communications project that aims to provide satellite internet access to just about every corner of the globe. It could be a big deal, but it’s going to require many, many satellites. In fact, “many, many” is underselling things a bit.

Elon Musk sends a tweet through SpaceX's Starlink broadband satellite

  Elon Musk sends a tweet through SpaceX's Starlink broadband satellite The CEO expressed surprise at his own success."Sending this tweet through space via Starlink satellite," he wrote, before following up to express his surprise.

SpaceX ' s plan could make astronomy 'impossible'. SpaceX has said it plans to paint its satellites black on the sides that face Earth, making them less As helpful as SpaceX ' s Starlink satellites may be, they could be a pain for astronomers . The Harvard-Smithsonian Center's Jonathan McDowell

As helpful as SpaceX ' s Starlink satellites may be, they could be a pain for astronomers . The Harvard-Smithsonian Center's Jonathan McDowell and others have observed that the internet satellites are bright enough to cause a "problem" for astronomy , and the eventual constellation of roughly 12,000

SpaceX imagines that as many as 42,000 individual satellites may be launched as part of the project. Thus far, 122 of them have been deployed, and they’re already causing a major headache for scientists that gaze skyward.

Ground-based telescopes using long exposure times to get a clear image of distant constellations also sometimes spot satellites as they pass by. One or two satellites transiting the area isn’t normally a huge problem, but dozens, hundreds, or tens of thousands of them? It’s an issue.

A series of tweets this week from astronomers paints a vivid picture of how dramatically SpaceX’s Starlink hardware can affect telescope observations. Clarae Martínez-Vázquez, an astronomer with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, voiced her dismay at the satellites contaminating the images.

Why Astronomers Worry About the Brightness of SpaceX's Starlink Satellites

  Why Astronomers Worry About the Brightness of SpaceX's Starlink Satellites SpaceX is planning to launch the second installment of its Starlink megaconstellation on Monday (Nov. 11), and astronomers are waiting to see — well, precisely what they will see. When the company launched its first set of Starlink internet satellites in May, those with their eyes attuned to the night sky immediately realized that the objects were incredibly bright. Professional astronomers worried the satellites would interfere with scientific observations and amateur appreciation of the stars.

A new research effort by the European Space Agency suggests that if we can get the technology working as intended, placing astronauts into a state of suspended animation might actually be the best way to explore the cosmos. SpaceX ’ s satellite horde is a nightmare for astronomers .

'Sensing the Earth': Nano- satellites swarm to boost disaster readiness : SpaceX ’ s satellite horde is a nightmare for astronomers SpaceX has done a lot to help s 02:20 20 november 2019 Source: msn.com. SpaceX ’ s satellite horde is a nightmare for astronomers .

An array of images captured by the DECam dark energy camera show how just 19 Starlink satellites can ruin an image. The frame is completely covered in bright streaks that represent individual satellites.

Remember, there are only just over 100 of these satellites in Earth orbit right now, but there may eventually be 42,000 of them. It’s not difficult to see the potential for Starlink to hinder scientific research efforts.

SpaceX, for its part, says it is open to finding a solution that will allow it to launch as many satellites as needed without hindering observations. One proposed fix is covering the satellites in non-reflective black paint, though that hasn’t been firmly decided on as of yet.

SpaceX is getting ready for its first launch of 2020 .
2019 was an absolutely packed year for SpaceX. 2020 promises to be just as action-packed, and the company is wasting no time getting its launch schedule back on track with its first launch of the year slated for January 6th. The mission was originally supposed to take place on December 30th, but delays forced SpaceX to push things back a bit.

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