Tech & Science: NASA refuses to give up on its struggling Mars mole - - PressFrom - United Kingdom
  •   
  •   

Tech & Science NASA refuses to give up on its struggling Mars mole

05:55  22 november  2019
05:55  22 november  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Astronauts are breathing into weird little machines for science

  Astronauts are breathing into weird little machines for science Dealing with low gravity in space can take some getting used to for scientists who make their way to the International Space Station. Now, researchers from the European Space Agency are using data from astronauts aboard the ISS to learn more about how space travel affects one very basic function of the human body: breathing.

NASA had some initial success with getting the mole to move, but it soon stalled and was even ejected halfway out of the ground in October. The latest development gives us some room for optimism. InSight is using its robotic arm to apply pressure to the side of the mole where it ' s sticking out of the

The mole 's up -and-down Mars saga has taken yet another turn. The mole has backed about halfway out of its burrow, mission team members announced yesterday (Oct. So, InSight remains on track despite the mole 's struggles , said Thomas Zurbuchen, Associate Administrator for NASA 's Science

a close up of an umbrella: The InSight lander is encouraging the mole to keep burrowing. NASA/JPL-Caltech © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. The InSight lander is encouraging the mole to keep burrowing. NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's InSight lander wants to dig into Mars to take its temperature, but Mars hasn't been cooperating. We got a glimmer of good news Thursday when the InSight team announced the mole is once again on the move.

InSight is equipped with the Heat and Physical Properties Package probe, better known by its "mole" nickname. The heat probe is designed to burrow down to a depth of 16 feet (5 meters) to collect data on the planet's temperature from the inside. It hasn't been easy.

NASA had some initial success with getting the mole to move, but it soon stalled and was even ejected halfway out of the ground in October. The space agency and the German Aerospace Center, which designed the heat probe, have been working out a new plan to save the mole.

NASA chief says security needed to explore space safely

  NASA chief says security needed to explore space safely The head of NASA said Wednesday that space security is necessary so that the United States, Japan and others can safely explore the moon and Mars. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine also said during his Tokyo visit that he wants to take the U.S. space partnership with Japan to a new level by stepping up cooperation by going to the moon and eventually to Mars together.But he said that will be possible only if space is kept a safe place."NASA fully supports the idea of space security," he said.Japan and the U.S. have long cooperated in space science, including the ongoing International Space Station program.

NASA 's Mars InSight lander has a probe designed to dig up to 16 feet (5 meters) below the surface and measure heat coming from inside the planet. Even so, the mole was designed to push small rocks aside or wend its way around them. The instrument, which was provided for InSight by the German

NASA ’s Mars Opportunity rover isn’t doing much of anything right now, and that’s how it ’ s been for a number of months now. The rover was swallowed up by the planet-wide dust storm that engulfed Mars way back in June, and it was forced to enter a standby mode after its solar power was cut off by the

The latest development gives us some room for optimism. InSight is using its robotic arm to apply pressure to the side of the mole where it's sticking out of the ground. The mole has now moved down roughly 1.25 inches (32 millimeters). That's not a lot, but it's forward progress.

InSight reached Mars in late 2018 and has already logged some impressive achievements, including listening for marsquakes and logging the haunting "sounds" of the red planet. NASA would love to get the heat probe cranking, but InSight will still provide plenty of Mars insights even if the mole doesn't make it.

Mars at dawn: This NASA Curiosity rover image will enchant your heart .
The Curiosity rover gifted us with a gorgeous look at a new day dawning far, far away.Mars is barren and dry. Earth is luxuriating in water. Sometimes these two very different planets find common ground under the light of the same sun. NASA's Curiosity rover just captured one of those moments in a stirring new image showing dawn breaking across Gale Crater.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!