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Tech & Science Interstellar comet Borisov makes its historic flyby Sunday

05:45  08 december  2019
05:45  08 december  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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Unlike comet Borisov , Oumuamua was first seen after it had already made its closest pass by Earth, so there was little opportunity to study it closely. That is, if it doesn't break up and disintegrate as it passes by the sun . That's what happened with eagerly anticipated comet ISON in 2013, which was

Spotify Wrapped 2019 Interstellar comet Borisov Best Buy Apple sale Bernie Sanders on internet 'monopolies' The Witcher on Netflix Holiday gifts under . A shining comet from beyond our solar system is due to reach its closest point to the sun (and to Earth) on Sunday .

a night sky: Interstellar comet 2l/Borisov Pieter van Dokkum, Cheng-Han Hsieh, Shany Danieli, Gregory Laughlin © Provided by CNET Interstellar comet 2l/Borisov Pieter van Dokkum, Cheng-Han Hsieh, Shany Danieli, Gregory Laughlin

A shining comet from beyond our solar system is due to reach its closest point to the sun (and to Earth) on Sunday.

The landmark object is named comet 2I/Borisov because it's just the second interstellar anything ever spotted in our cosmic neighborhood (hence 2-I) and it was discovered by Crimean amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov, who has a track record of spotting new comets.

In 2017, an interstellar object was seen in our solar system for the first time when the bizarre, oblong Oumuamua was discovered. Its odd shape and apparent acceleration as it disappeared into deep space led to all kinds of theories about its origin, prompting a prominent Harvard astronomer to even suggest it might be a product of some alien intelligence.

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The comet will make its closest approach to the sun around December 8, and proposals are piling up to keep an eye For practical reasons, humans won’t be sending a last-ditch flyby mission to visit the careening comet . But researchers with the Initiative for Interstellar Studies, a U.K.-based nonprofit

On Sunday , Dec. 8 the comet that now bears his name — 2I Borisov — will make a wide turn around the sun and began heading back out of the solar system. Borisov , in contrast, is thriving, sprouting a typically bushy, radiant tail. As a comet , it would be utterly ordinary if not for its origin.

Unlike comet Borisov, Oumuamua was first seen after it had already made its closest pass by Earth, so there was little opportunity to study it closely. Comet Borisov was observed in August and scientists have already been able to determine it's very different from Oumuamua. It's basically the same as most comets within our own solar system.

Hopefully this latest interstellar interloper will continue to be visible for several more weeks as it continues on its journey. That is, if it doesn't break up and disintegrate as it passes by the sun. That's what happened with eagerly anticipated comet ISON in 2013, which was supposed to be the celestial sight of a lifetime, but fizzled on approach as it was broken apart by the sun's radiation.

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That maybe- comet from another star really is a comet from another star, and now it has a name and a date with destiny. On Dec. 7, the newly named comet 2I/ Borisov will make its closest approach to the sun and then begin a journey back outward through the southern sky in December and January.

An Interstellar Comet . On Sunday , a comet from beyond our solar system will make its closest approach to the sun . The comet , known as 2I/ Borisov , is moving about 20 miles a second, fast enough to slip through the solar system and escape back into interstellar space.

2I/Borisov as it appears for viewers at mid-northern latitudes this month, around the time of the comet's closest approach. The view is toward the south about an hour and a half before sunrise. This is when the comet is highest in the sky, at the start of astronomical twilight, the very first predawn sunlight. NASA © Provided by CNET 2I/Borisov as it appears for viewers at mid-northern latitudes this month, around the time of the comet's closest approach. The view is toward the south about an hour and a half before sunrise. This is when the comet is highest in the sky, at the start of astronomical twilight, the very first predawn sunlight. NASA

Unfortunately, Borisov isn't going to be bright enough for most backyard astronomers to observe, but the pros have already begun to capture some pretty brilliant images on approach, like the one above. If you have access to a telescope with at least a 30-centimeter (12-inch) aperture, you can try hunting for it in the direction of the constellations Corvus the crow and Crater the cup over the next few nights.

a black and blue sky in the background: 2I/Borisov as it appears for viewers at mid-northern latitudes in December 2019, around the time of the comet's closest approach. The view is toward the south about an hour and a half before sunrise. This is when the comet is highest in the sky, at the start of astronomical twilight, the very first predawn sunlight. © CNET

2I/Borisov as it appears for viewers at mid-northern latitudes in December 2019, around the time of the comet's closest approach. The view is toward the south about an hour and a half before sunrise. This is when the comet is highest in the sky, at the start of astronomical twilight, the very first predawn sunlight.

Researchers will continue to gather as much data as they can on Borisov in the coming months. Astronomers poring over old observations were able to find the comet hiding in data from almost a year ago as it came nearer.

The hope is to eventually trace the comet back to its source, but that could be difficult, as Borisov may be a semi-permanent wanderer, bouncing from one solar system to another.

Ramble on, you dusty old space snowball.

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