•   
  •   

Tech & Science Google just beat humans at spotting breast cancer — but it won’t replace them

05:20  02 january  2020
05:20  02 january  2020 Source:   msn.com

Doctors warn cancelling cancer surgeries would lead to ‘severe knock-on consequences’

  Doctors warn cancelling cancer surgeries would lead to ‘severe knock-on consequences’ Consultants have warned that cancelling planned surgeries for patients with breast or prostate cancer, due to A&E overcrowding, would have ‘severe knock-on consequences’ for them. And according to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO), the total remained at the same alarming figure on Tuesday. The influx has forced some hospitals to cancel elective surgeries. University Hospital Kerry cancelled all such treatment due to take place this week, and is due to review the decision.

Today, breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in women, beat out only by lung cancer in its deadliness and overall prevalence. Early detection is the best defense most people have in identifying and treating the disease. Yet while mammograms are the most common detection tool

GoogLeNet AI just used image recognition and bested human doctors at detecting breast cancer . These are still extremely early developments, but they illustrate the vast potential of AI in the not-too-distant future. These AI algorithms won ' t be replacing your doctor, but they might just make them

a man sitting at a desk with a computer monitor and keyboard © Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP via Getty Images

Google is developing artificial intelligence to help doctors identify breast cancer, according to a research paper published in Nature today. The model, which scans X-ray images known as mammograms, reduces the number of false negatives by 9.4 percent—a hopeful leap forward for a test that currently misses 20 percent of breast cancers, as reported by The New York Times.

Today, breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in women, beat out only by lung cancer in its deadliness and overall prevalence. Early detection is the best defense most people have in identifying and treating the disease. Yet while mammograms are the most common detection tool, they miss a large number of cases. “Mammograms are very effective but there’s still a significant problem with false negatives and false positives,” Shravya Shetty, a researcher at Google who co-authored the paper, tells The Verge.

Remarkable New T-Cell Discovery Can Kill Several Cancer Types in The Lab

  Remarkable New T-Cell Discovery Can Kill Several Cancer Types in The Lab The discovery of a new kind of immune cell receptor could pave the way for a new type of T-cell cancer therapy that can attack a diverse range of cancers in human patients without requiring tailored treatment. The researchers behind the discovery emphasise that testing is still at an early stage, having been conducted only in mice and in human cells in the lab, not yet in living patients. But the preliminary results are promising, and suggest we could be on the verge of a significant advancement in T-cell therapies.

Program developed by Google Health was tested on mammograms of UK and US women.

It is just one of Google ’s ventures into medicine. Google paid for the study, and worked with researchers from Northwestern University in Chicago and two British medical centers, Cancer Research Imperial Centre and Royal Surrey County Hospital.

“Mammograms are very effective but there’s still a significant problem with false negatives and false positives”

In the study, which Google funded, researchers used anonymized mammograms from more than 25,000 women in the UK and 3,000 women in the US. “We tried to follow the same principles radiologists might follow,” Shetty says. According to Google’s blog post, the team first trained AI to scan X-ray images, then looked for signs of breast cancer by identifying changes in the breasts of the 28,000 women. They then checked the computer’s guesses against the women's’ actual medical outcomes.

Ultimately, they were able to reduce false negatives by 9.4 percent and cut down false positives by 5.7 percent for women in the US. In the UK, where two radiologists typically double-check the results, the model cut down false negatives by 2.7 percent and reduced false positives by 1.2 percent. “The model performs better than an individual radiologist in both the UK and the US,” Christopher Kelly, a scientist at Google who co-authored the paper, tells Wired.

Cork mum and breast cancer survivor brands diagnosis 'a gift'

  Cork mum and breast cancer survivor brands diagnosis 'a gift' She used Lego to explain her lumpectomy to her young daughterA single mum and breast cancer survivor has branded her diagnosis “a gift” and is now inspiring others with her 100 Days Of Walking.

Google explains that, in a pair of recently-published research papers, the LYNA tool demonstrated incredible accuracy in determining whether breast cancer had spread to a patient’s lymph nodes. Determining this is a major factor in deciding how a cancer patient might proceed, and can change

Humans pride ourselves on our supreme intelligence: our clever inventions, and the ability to use them . The pigeons continued to ace the test, spotting breast cancer with 85 percent accuracy. Pigeons won ’ t replace radiologists in the clinic, but they may pick up some of the grunt work.

The system was not perfect. While researchers found that AI outperformed doctors in identifying breast cancer in most cases, there were also instances where doctors flagged cancer that the model originally missed. “Sometimes, all six U.S. readers caught a cancer that slipped past the AI, and vice versa,” Mozziyar Etemadi, a researcher at Northwestern University and another co-author of the paper, tells The Wall Street Journal.

Still, Google says it’s hopeful the system can eventually be used in clinical settings. “We’re very excited and encouraged by these results,” says Daniel Tse, a product manager at Google who also co-authored the paper. He tells The Verge that the team is currently working to ensure the findings can be generalized across populations. “There’s obviously quite a bit of nuance when you put this into clinical practice,” he adds.

Google has been careful to frame this project as one that will help radiologists, not replace them. “They each bring their own strength, it’s complementary,” says Shetty. “There are a number of cases where the radiologists catch something that the model misses, and vice versa. Bringing the two together could strengthen the overall results.”

The project is part of Google’s ongoing efforts to expand into the field of healthcare. Earlier this year, the tech giant partnered with Ascension to gain access to the health records of millions of American citizens. That project came under fire after a whistleblower alleged the health records were not being anonymized. For the breast cancer study, Google partnered with clinical researchers in the US and UK, and used data that had already been de-identified.

Keelin Took Tough News Job, Despite Terminal Diagnosis .
Tributes have been paid to RTÉ news journalist Keelin Shanley who lost her long battle with breast cancer on Saturday. The 51-year-old mother of two had been a co-presenter on the station’s flagship TV news programme Six One until last May, when she took leave so she could concentrate on her health and her young family.Ms Shanley died just days after celebrating her 20th wedding anniversary with her husband Conor. Ms Shanley and her RTÉ news colleague Caitríona Perry made Irish broadcasting history in 2018 when they became the first women to be appointed as joint presenters of the evening news programme.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!