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Tech & Science Quadrantid meteor shower looks like pure magic in astronaut's view from ISS

05:40  07 january  2020
05:40  07 january  2020 Source:   cnet.com

The Leonid Meteor Shower Explained in 10 Facts

  The Leonid Meteor Shower Explained in 10 Facts Each year around Nov. 17-18 the Leonid meteor shower peaks, offering up several shooting stars an hour. In some years there are dramatic bursts in which many meteors rain down every minute. Learn what's behind this fickle show.Learn what's behind this fickle show with these fun facts here!

The Quadrantid meteor shower gave ISS astronauts quite a show . Koch' s view is a multi-layered delight. It has the scenic meteor streaks, a glittering puddle of city lights and the ectoplasm-green glow of the Northern Lights aurora along the horizon.

The Quadrantid meteor shower is not as well-known as other meteor showers like the Geminids or Orionids, because the meteors are fainter and easier Related: Amazing Quadrantid Meteor Shower Photos by Stargazers. Photographer Jeff Berkes captured several Quadrantid meteors in this

The Quadrantid meteor shower gave ISS astronauts quite a show. NASA/Christina Koch © Provided by CNET The Quadrantid meteor shower gave ISS astronauts quite a show. NASA/Christina Koch

Us Earth-bound folks got to experience the annual Quadrantid meteor shower this month as a show of bright lights shooting across the dark night sky. The astronauts on board the International Space Station saw these same meteors, but with a very different backdrop.

"Can you see shooting starts [sic] from space? Turns out, yes!" NASA astronaut Christina Koch tweeted on Monday along with a composite image showing what the Quadrantids look like from space. 

Koch's view is a multi-layered delight. It has the scenic meteor streaks, a glittering puddle of city lights and the ectoplasm-green glow of the Northern Lights aurora along the horizon.

The ISS crew witnesses and documents what's happening down below, both tragedies and wonders. This meteor shower definitely counts as a wonder.

Scientists Claim to Have Found The First Known Extraterrestrial Protein in a Meteorite .
A new discovery could be a clue for us to see if life could emerge elsewhere in the Solar System. Using a new analysis technique, scientists think they have found an extraterrestrial protein, tucked inside a meteorite that fell to Earth 30 years ago. If their results can be replicated, it will be the first protein ever identified that didn't originate here on Earth."This paper characterises the first protein to be discovered in a meteorite," the researchers wrote in a paper uploaded to preprint server arXiv. Their work is yet to be peer reviewed, but the implications of this finding are noteworthy.

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